Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your email address or mobile phone number.

Buy Used
$6.95
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Book is in Good Used Condition. Text pages appear to be free from markings. Exterior of book shows moderate wear which may include scuffs on edges, dust jacket/cover curling, nicks, blemishes, tanning, and/or creases. Previous owner's name/cover note may be written on inside cover page. Eligible for FREE Super Saving Shipping! Fast Amazon shipping plus a hassle free return policy means your 100% Satisfaction is Guaranteed. Tracking number provided in your Amazon account with every order.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

In the Company of Giants: Candid Conversations With the Visionaries of the Digital World Paperback – September 4, 1998

4.2 out of 5 stars 9 customer reviews

See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$4.94 $0.01
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Amazon Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Top 20 lists in Books
Top 20 lists in Books
View the top 20 best sellers of all time, the most reviewed books of all time and some of our editors' favorite picks. Learn more
click to open popover

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Rama Dev Jager and Rafael Ortiz offer readers an insider's view into the history and people behind today's greatest digital successes. In a series of probing interviews, Microsoft's Bill Gates, America Online's Steve Case, Dell Computer's Michael Dell, and 13 others share their stories of how it all happened. They share their recollections of the good decisions and bad, the misfortunes and lucky breaks, but most of all, the people and attitudes that turned the ideas of these digital age giants into the most influential companies in the world of computing. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Booklist

Without fear of exaggeration, Jager and Ortiz use their title to entice readers. The two have snared an impressive roster of the biggest names from the world of computers and information. They encourage the likes of Steve Jobs, Larry Ellison, Bill Gates, Bill Hewlett, Andy Grove, and 11 others to offer up personal views and comments on their products, their companies, and their competitors. While many such gatherings have focused on the effects of the information revolution or on future scenarios, Jager and Ortiz get their interviewees to discuss the entrepreneurial aspects of their companies, highlighting their successes and failures and explaining how they got started and what barriers they have encountered. One can only imagine the sparks that might have flown had these 16 participated in some sort of roundtable. In the meantime, these individual conversations can help satisfy our curiosity. David Rouse --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE


Product Details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Mcgraw-Hill; Reprint edition (September 4, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0070329656
  • ISBN-13: 978-0070329652
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 5.5 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,651,301 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Herve Lebret on November 15, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I had read In the Company of Giants in 1997 just before becoming a venture capitalist. Then when I began to read again about entrepreneurs, I just could not find it anymore and had to buy it through the reseller network of Amazon. It is as interesting as Once You're Lucky, Betting it All, Founders at Work. Here are some examples:
Steve Jobs: "In the early days, we were just trying to hire people that knew more than we did about anything and that wasn't hard because we didn't know a lot. Then your perspectives are changing monthly as you learn more. People have to be able to change."
T. J. Rodgers (Cypress Semiconductor): "the standard entrepreneurial answer is frustration. You see a company running poorly, you see that it could be a whole better. Intel and AMD were arrogant. If you think about it, any billion dollar company, that has so much money to spend on R&D should be unassailable. But the large companies routinely cannot crunch little companies so something's got to be wrong."
Gordon Eubanks (Symantec): "What makes a company successful is people, process, product, and passion. You must have great people and product and passion balanced by process."
Steve Case (AOL): "Do something you really love, you are passionate about. Take a long-term view, be really patient. There are going to be bumps on the road."
Scott Cook (Intuit): "People [customers] won't tell you what they want. Often they can't verbalize it because they don't understand things they've not seen. You must understand fundamental motivations and attitudes."
Sandy Kurtzig (ASK): "I did not see it as incredible risk. Many entrepreneurs would tell you why it was obvious to do what they did. When you have nothing, you have nothing to lose. That's why so few entrepreneurs can do it a second time.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
In the Company of Giants - Candid Conversations with the Visionaries of the Digital World By Rama D. Jager & Rafael Ortiz McGraw-Hill Book Co Besides their bank accounts, what is the X-factor that distinguishes individuals like Bill Gates as juggernauts in the digital industry? Is it their IQ, business acumen, or luck? It's hard to say, but one thing for sure is that every one of them has a battle story to tell and scars to show. In the Company of Giants cuts through the ills of wordiness and brings to you, unfiltered, the ideas, insights and strategies of the movers and shakers of the digital world. Remember the movie Phenomenon starring John Travolta? Travolta's average Joe character went from small-town mechanic to genius in a bolt of lightning. Now don't we all appreciate a blast of genius now and then; we all fall prey to the overnight success stories churned out by the Hollywood movie-making machine, but there will be none of that in this book. Everyone interviewed in this book is riddled with battle scars from clamouring to the top. In the Company of Giants is written in a question-and-answer format preceded by a short introduction that reads kind of like a resume of the interviewee. A parade of clear thinkers and visionaries like Steve Jobs (Apple), Bill Gates (Microsoft) and Charles Wang (Computer Associates) pack the pages with their visions, business philosophies, and predictions. Although the Q&A format is highly effective in presenting the ideas of these top guns in an unfiltered manner, I have reservations about the information and responses being too well-prepared and sometimes reeking of public-relations hype. Nonetheless, the interviewers did an excellent job of asking probing and exploratory questions in true journalistic fashion.Read more ›
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This book grew out of a series of interviews by the authors with some of the most powerful visionaries of the computer industry. Among them are Bill Hewlett, Michael Dell, Andy Grove, Ken Olsen, Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, Sandy Kurtzig, Steve Case and Ed McCracken. Some of the topics covered are business strategy, getting started, utilizing human capital, successful partnerships, fostering teamwork, customer relations, using technology and leadership practices.

If you're looking for a formula to successful participation in the computer industry, this book will not provide it. If you are looking for insights on business practices and strategy from some of the greatest entrepreneurs in the computer industry, this book will offer that and more.

Also included in the book are profiles of the entrepreneurs, their backgrounds and core values. This book is a candid look at the many different ways that business can be grown and fostered, from some of the greatest business minds of the computer industry.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Rama Dev Jager and Rafael Ortiz present an excellent series of 16 interviews with the digital world's most successful leaders: Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, T.J. Rodgers, Gordon Eubanks, Steve Case, Scott Cook, Sandy Kurtzig, John Warnock, Charles Geschke, Michael Dell, Charles Wang, Andy Grove, Trip Hawkins, Ed McCracken, Ken Olsen, and Bill Hewlett. Each interview begins with a brief history of how each person founded a company and produced groundbreaking change in the digital industry. These pioneers answer many probing questions about their achievements, visions for the future of electronic technology, and tips for success. Their interview responses are highly informative and engaging. The book is thoughtfully written and well edited. Although much of its advice will be familiar to experienced marketers, managers, and executives, we [...] recommend it to them because of the useful and interesting inside look at the techniques and insights these industry leaders employed to such successful results.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse