Competition and Coercion: Blacks in the American economy 1865-1914 Reprint Edition

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ISBN-13: 978-0521088404
ISBN-10: 0521088402
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Book Description

Competition and Coercion: Blacks in the American economy, 1865-1914 is a reinterpretation of black economic history in the half-century after Emancipation. Its central theme is that economic competition and racial coercion jointly determined the material condition of the blacks.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 220 pages
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press; Reprint edition (October 30, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0521088402
  • ISBN-13: 978-0521088404
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.5 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,243,127 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Dr. Robert Higgs (born 1 February 1944) is an American economic historian and an economist of the Austrian school. His writings in economics and economic history have most often focused on the causes, means, and effects of government growth. Dr. Higgs has written extensively about the ratchet effect, the economic causes of the Great Depression, regime uncertainty, and the myth that World War II caused economic recovery in the late 1940s.

Currently Dr. Higgs is Senior Fellow in Political Economy for The Independent Institute and Editor of the Institute's quarterly journal The Independent Review. He received his Ph.D. in economics from Johns Hopkins University, and he has taught at the University of Washington, Lafayette College, Seattle University, and the University of Economics, Prague. He has been a visiting scholar at Oxford University and Stanford University, and a fellow for the Hoover Institution and the National Science Foundation.

Dr. Higgs is the recipient of numerous awards, including the Gary Schlarbaum Award for Lifetime Defense of Liberty, Thomas Szasz Award for Outstanding Contributions to the Cause of Civil Liberties, Lysander Spooner Award for Advancing the Literature of Liberty, Friedrich von Wieser Memorial Prize for Excellence in Economic Education, and Templeton Honor Rolls Award on Education in a Free Society.

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Jim VanderVlucht on June 30, 2015
Format: Hardcover
Mr. Jones above may reconsider the idea that color mismatch renders the condition of one race incompatible with another. If valuable ideas are locked in some superficial flux as race, he'd be proposing that Dr. King could not offer criticism of a white person, considering the possible racial divide. You're not productively interested in the "race" of Dr. Higgs, to begin with, as it lends nothing to his premise.
Surely until someone dumps the racial historicism of the content of their mind, they'll remain exactly where a would-be oppressor would prefer. Don't yield to that. Seek ideas for the value contained. This book is one of a very few that offer such an economic survey of this nature, highlighting the dichotomy that uncomforts self styled liberals and conservatives both.
Higgs' book is an easily missed contribution to the understanding of emergent progress in the face of overt racism. Against the popular implicit narrative that "blacks" are somehow different because they don't respond appropriately to government stimulus and assistance, Higgs offers a stoic appraisal of people who respond to opportunity and OVERCOME racial prejudice and even violence. The book ought to have a place on your shelf, even if you nurture disagreement. It's well sourced and composed to represent the case made, and belongs next to classics like W. H. Hutt's Economics of the Colour Bar, another underappreciated work that fills many gaps in the public's soft formed understanding race and opportunity.
Read this book!
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0 of 34 people found the following review helpful By A. Jones on May 5, 2015
Format: Paperback
I love white men thinking they can write about black people :/
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