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Compilers: Principles, Techniques, and Tools (2nd Edition) Hardcover – September 10, 2006

ISBN-13: 978-0321486813 ISBN-10: 0321486811 Edition: 2nd

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 1000 pages
  • Publisher: Addison Wesley; 2nd edition (September 10, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0321486811
  • ISBN-13: 978-0321486813
  • Product Dimensions: 9.5 x 6.5 x 1.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (86 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #212,092 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Alfred V. Aho is Lawrence Gussman Professor of Computer Science at Columbia University. Professor Aho has won several awards including the Great Teacher Award for 2003 from the Society of Columbia Graduates and the IEEE John von Neumann Medal.  He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a fellow of the ACM and IEEE.

 

Monica S. Lam is a Professor of Computer Science at Stanford University, was the Chief Scientist at Tensilica and the founding CEO of moka5. She led the SUIF project which produced one of the most popular research compilers, and pioneered numerous compiler techniques used in industry.

 

Ravi Sethi launched the research organization in Avaya and is president of Avaya Labs.  Previously, he was a senior vice president at Bell Labs in Murray Hill and chief technical officer for communications software at Lucent Technologies. He has held teaching positions at the Pennsylvania State University and the University of Arizona, and has taught at Princeton University and Rutgers.  He is a fellow of the ACM.

 

Jeffrey Ullman is CEO of Gradiance and a Stanford W. Ascherman Professor of Computer Science at Stanford University. His research interests include database theory, database integration, data mining, and education using the information infrastructure.  He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a fellow of the ACM, and winner of the Karlstrom Award and Knuth Prize.

 


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Customer Reviews

And these topics are covered in great details in this book.
G. Avvinti
This is a very well put together book to learn on your own about compilers and how they work.
Himanshu Narayana
One more thing: this book has the best typesetting of all the scientific books I've read.
Jonas Nilsson (di92jn@yahoo.se)

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

158 of 169 people found the following review helpful By Jason Evans on May 18, 2007
Format: Hardcover
I spent some serious quality time with the first edition (the "red dragon book"), in three main episodes over the past dozen years: 1) undergraduate compilers class, 2) industry project, and 3) parser generator implementation. During all three episodes, I was disappointed in various ways, though there is no denying that the book contains a wealth of information. As an undergraduate, I found the book somewhat impenetrable. When in industry, I found the book too abstract. When implementing a parser generator, I discovered that the book excludes important research results with regard to LR parser generation. It is the last disappointment that I will focus on.

The book presents parser generation in layers of increasing complexity, from SLR to LR to LALR, where LALR is presented as the penultimate algorithm, though LALR parsers can only handle a subset of the grammars that LR can handle. The justification for this is that the original Knuth LR algorithm is intractable for large grammars. However, an efficient, fully correct, approach for LR parser generation was published in 1977, and on top of that it appears easier to implement than efficient LALR parser generation! The red dragon book's original authors simply cannot have been unaware of this research result, but I suspect that they elected to warm over the "green dragon book" (published in 1977) rather than incorporate the state of the art as of 1986 into the "red dragon book". Now here we are another 20 years later, and as near as I can tell from reading through available online information, the "purple dragon book" is perpetuating this omission. The result of the red dragon book is that we have an entire generation of computer scientists who have been mislead to think that LALR is somehow superior to LR, and the purple dragon book is setting things up for yet another generation to be mislead.
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62 of 64 people found the following review helpful By Daniel Mall on March 14, 2000
Format: Hardcover
During each compiler stage (lexical analysis, syntax analysis, translation, type checking, translation, code generation, and code optimization) multiple methods, strategies, and algorithms are presented. This comprehensive book examines items that are unique to the various languages presented (Fortran, C, and Pascal); there are even sections on dealing with estimation of types (10.12) and symbolic debugging of optimized code (10.13). Wow! The exercises are thorough, challenging, and thought provoking. Examples are interleaved with the discussion and algorithms. There is an excellent set of historical and bibliographic information at the end of each chapter. The use of automated tools such as lex, yacc, and compiler-generators is discussed throughout the text. This is an advanced book, however a good understanding of compilers can be obtained without understanding the details of every algorithm.
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56 of 59 people found the following review helpful By Erich Blume on January 13, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Aho, Ullman et. al's "Compilers" is a fantastic book and well worth studying for all computer programmers - implementing a compiler compiler will yield tangental benefits to anyone who writes programs for a living or for fun.

However, the Amazon Kindle edition of this book is *awful*. First and foremost, I discovered at least one error in an algorithm that is not present in the standard edition that causes the book's proposed algorithms to be incorrect (in this case, it was algorithm 4.31 - in step 1, you should compute FIRST(alpha), not FIRST(A).)

On top of that, there are spacing issues and font issues throughout the book. It appears that in many places where the standard edition had a word separated across lines, the Kindle edition merely has that word split in two with a space between its halves. Worse, the font choice used to typeset algorithms doesn't easily distinguish many greek lowercase letters from their modern English equivalents, the result being that it is fiendishly difficult to understand some algorithms (the book uses greek letters to indicate a 'sentential form', so they appear a *lot* and tend to be right next to their modern equivalents.)

In other words, I would give Compilers (the Standard edition) a 5/5 (or maybe a 4/5 - it could stand to use a bit more real-world code), but this Kindle edition is rubbish and you SHOULD NOT BUY.
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95 of 105 people found the following review helpful By G. Avvinti on April 19, 2002
Format: Hardcover
Once again, I want to point out the title of the book: "Principles, Techniques and Tools".
I think there are two kinds of compilers books available today: "Principles and Theory centered" ones and "Modern Compilers design and implementation" ones.
One might wonder what's the difference between the two.
The former kind is more suited for a course on theoretical aspects that lay the foundation of compiler construction. DFAs, NFAs and Regular expression along with relations and equivalence between the them; FSAs minimizations; grammars and Push-down FSAs in details, ambiguities and and how to cope with them; and so on.
This is what I mean for "theoretical aspects". And these topics are covered in great details in this book. Almost the same details they (the authors) placed on writing a more specific book as "Introduction to Automata Theory ...".
Same situation applies to principles on more application- oriented topics. Take the example of LR parsing. You can face the topic from a more theoretical side, dealing with details on bottom up parsing (still, it implies an in-depth knowledge of grammars theory), handles and (viable) prefixes, SLR or canonical LR or LALR parsers and techniques for the relative tables construction by hands (and for this, add a detailed and solid knowledge of Push-down FSAs along with grammars). By hands, at least, if principles are what matter in your course.
If you expect to find these topics (with this depth) in a book of the other kind, you might get mislead. As I did when I still had not clear this distinction, before I took the course.
The latter kind of books is more suited for a more pragmatic course.
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