Prime Music
Currently unavailable.
We don't know when or if this item will be back in stock.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Color:
  • Complete Animals
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
  • To view this video download Flash Player
      

Complete Animals


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Audio CD, September 15, 2000

Amazon's The Animals Store

Music

Image of album by The Animals

Photos

Image of The Animals

Biography

Formed in Newcastle upon Tyne during 1962 and 1963 when Eric Burdon joined the Alan Price Rhythm and Blues Combo, the original line-up comprised Eric Burdon (vocals), Alan Price (organ and keyboards), Hilton Valentine (guitar), John Steel (drums), and Bryan "Chas" Chandler (bass). They were dubbed "animals" because of their wild stage act and the name stuck. The ... Read more in Amazon's The Animals Store

Visit Amazon's The Animals Store
for 115 albums, 16 photos, discussions, and more.

Product Details

  • Audio CD (September 15, 2000)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Import Records
  • ASIN: B0002B5TB2
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (39 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,379,198 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
5 star
26
4 star
10
3 star
3
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 39 customer reviews
It includes all of the original Animals' music, recorded from 1964 to 1965.
"steendean"
There are many Animals compilations out there, some of which are good and others that are awful, but this one is quite possibly the best one.
"whodoithinkiam"
In 1963, all the great British bands were cover bands; no band did songs of their own composition.
Robert Moore

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

35 of 35 people found the following review helpful By Peter Durward Harris HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWER on February 9, 2004
The Animals, a group that included Eric Burdon and Alan Price, were the first major pop stars to emerge from Newcastle, a city located about 300 miles north of London, therefore far removed from where most talent scouts were searching. It is fortunate for us all that the Animals were discovered because they recorded some of the best R+B music to come of the UK in the sixties.

Their biggest hit was House of the rising sun, a re-working of a folk song (apparently inspired by Josh White's version of the song) that gave them a transatlantic number one hit. They had five other top ten UK hits with Mickie Most, these being I'm crying, Don't let me be misunderstood (a cover of a Nina Simone song), Bring it on home to me (a Sam Cooke cover), We gotta get out of this place (the version included here is the UK version - a markedly different recording was released in America but was unavailable for inclusion in this set) and It's my life.

Apart from their singles, the Animals recorded many other covers including Boom boom, Dimples, I'm mad again (all John Lee Hooker), Around and around, Memphis Tennessee, How you've changed (all Chuck Berry), I'm in love again, I've been around (both Fats Domino), Talking about you, Hallelujah I love her so and I believe to my soul (all Ray Charles). These covers clearly demonstrate what their main influences were, but they also wrote some of their own songs.

All the music I've mentioned so far and much more can be found on this excellent compilation. Nevertheless, despite the title of the compilation, it isn't actually their complete recordings - there is a sub-text explaining that these are the complete recordings that they made with Mickie Most as producer, although the liner notes describe their whole career.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
37 of 38 people found the following review helpful By Robert Moore HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on February 11, 2002
First, ignore the oldest, 3-star review here. If this is a 3-star album, then so is BLONDE ON BLONDE.
With just a couple of changes in the development of modern rock, the Animals might be considered one of the ten greatest bands of all time. It is hard today to realize how much the success of the Beatles changed music in general, and the British music scene in particular. In 1963, all the great British bands were cover bands; no band did songs of their own composition. The Beatles themselves, the Stones, The Animals, Manfred Mann, John Mayall's Bluesbreakers, the Yardbirds, The Who, all were primarily cover bands. What did they cover? American music, mainly blues, Chuck Berry, R&B, Buddy Holly, some Elvis, and various odds and ends. But none of them were covering their own music. The Beatles, however, shook things up by performing songs that they wrong themselves. By 1964, more and more bands were relying on songs of their own composition. In 1965, and Bob Dylan's HIGHWAY 61 REVISITED, the age of the cover band was over. You either wrote your own material, or you faded away. The history of early British rock can be told in terms of those bands in which a songwriter or writers emerged, and those in which one didn't. Keith Richards and Mick Jagger discovered that they could write, as did Pete Townshend, and Ray Davies of the Kinks. But the Animals, Manfred Mann, the Yardbirds, and John Mayall never developed songwriters, and faded from the scene. The Beatles changed the rules for rock and roll success. In 1963, the rule was that you were a great band if you were a great cover band. In 1965, you had to write your own stuff.
None of this should obscure the fact that The Animals were a flat out great band.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By J. E FELL on May 7, 2001
This 2 cd anthology contains the complete Mickie Most recordings from 1964-65. This anthology contains prime slices of British Invasion R&B and blues. Perhaps overshadowed by the Beatles, Rolling Stones, The Who, and the Yardbirds, the Animals were still a great group. The dominant features of this import set are the singing of Eric Burdon and the organ playing of Alan Price. Chas Chandler who later produced for Jimi Hendrix plays bass on this set. Hilton Valentine handles the guitar duties. Included in the set are many of their classic songs. "The House Of The Rising Son", "We've Gotta Get Out Of This Place", "Don't Let Me Be Misunderstood" and "It's My Life" to name a few. Some of my other favorites include "Gonna Send You Back To Walker", "I'm Going To Change The World", and "Boom Boom" among many others. The set also features some previously unissued tracks from these sessions. Fans of the British Invasion and the British R&B/Blues scene need this set. It contains early period material only. Fans of their psychedelic era need to look elsewhere. Essential compilation!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By "whodoithinkiam" on January 1, 2004
There are many Animals compilations out there, some of which are good and others that are awful, but this one is quite possibly the best one. By getting this compilation you are essentially getting the band's first two albums, "The Animals" and "Animal Tracks" and a whole bunch of bonus tracks at a fraction of the cost of getting all the material seperately.
Considering the remastering job is from 1990, the sound quality is impressive. Many other compilations have poorly transferred versions of these songs. The sound quality sets apart the Animals stylistically from their other British counterparts (the Kinks, the Who, the Yardbirds). The vocals and drums are especially clear, while the keyboard parts waver a bit here and there and the guitar is mixed up pretty high in places. Nothing that bothered me, however (I can accept the distortion on the last note of House of the Rising Sun).
The tracks here include every legitimate recording produced by Mickie Most and original keyboard player Alan Price is present on every single track with the exception of "It's My Life" - which is done by a Price-less lineup (no pun intended). Almost every song is a cover version; original material was not the Animals strong suit at this time. Stuff like "Inside Looking Out" and "See See Rider" are not present here because this collection focuses exclusively on the Mickie Most recordings instead of overextending itself by attempting a truly "complete" collection.
Almost immediately after the last session featured on this compilation the band would head for new creative fields with new personnel in tow. Two years later, the Animals would be a completely different band with the exception of singer Eric Burdon.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Look for Similar Items by Category