Qty:1
  • List Price: $20.00
  • Save: $2.47 (12%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
A Complete History of the... has been added to your Cart
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: PLEASE READ FULL DESCRIPTION*Tracking Provided For All Domestic Shipments* Ships directly from Amazon. Text is clean and unmarked, pages are bright. Spine is uncreased. Binding is tight. Cover has light wear. Inside no writing or highlighting. Sealed in shrink wrap.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

A Complete History of the Negro Leagues: 1884 to 1955 Paperback – January 27, 1998


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$17.53
$14.24 $0.66

Best Books of the Year
See the Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.
$17.53 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.


Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

In their heyday, the Negro Leagues were an important part of black America, with games between black teams drawing as many as 40,000 fans in some large cities, and the players themselves as celebrated as musicians like Louis Armstrong or Duke Ellington. Mark Ribowsky's concise history masterfully evokes these long-gone days with portraits of such Hall of Fame players as Satchel Paige, Josh Gibson and Cool Papa Bell. The story is bittersweet--though various incarnations of the Negro Leagues survived well into the 1950s, the end of the leagues was sealed when the Brooklyn Dodgers signed Jackie Robinson in 1945. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Publishers Weekly

Baseball apartheid existed until Jackie Robinson broke that barrier in 1947. Ironically, with the integration of major league baseball, the death knell was rung for "blackball." In this blunt look at the Negro leagues, Ribowsky (Don't Look Back) unsentimentally chronicles what he calls the penal colony of American baseball. Frozen out of the major as well as the minor leagues in the late 19th century, blacks were forced to form their own leagues. These leagues, which became "a black social requisite," produced some of the greatest players ever: the first genuine "blackball" star, Andrew "Rube" Foster, whose fastball and business instincts were always on target; the legendary Satchel Paige, "blackball's first major cult hero"; Josh Gibson, blackball's Babe Ruth; and a kid with a sweet swing who went by the sobriquet "Pork Chops"-Henry Aaron. Ribowsky pays special attention to the business of black baseball for its ingenious and often inspired financial manipulation and chides major league baseball about the fact that there are no black executives in the Hall of Fame. Ribowsky also looks at the hypocrisy of the white baseball hierarchy, who would not employ black players but who, like the New York Yankees, would rent out their stadiums to blacks at more than $100,000 a year. A no-nonsense look at a time when only the ball was white. Photos not seen by PW.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 372 pages
  • Publisher: Citadel; Carol Pub. Group Ed edition (January 27, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0806518685
  • ISBN-13: 978-0806518688
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.1 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 2.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,035,720 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

2.8 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 3, 1999
Format: Hardcover
I got what I wanted from this book. It is an honest depiction of who and what the Negro Leagues were. Much of what I knew about the Negro Leagues prior to reading this book was based on "myths". I felt that Ribowsky did a good job of distinguishing myth from fact and compiled an excellent story.
At times the book is a little confusing when it comes to trying to understand who is who. But, the Negro Leaques survived during a very confusing time.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Michael Gonsiska on March 27, 2000
Format: Hardcover
I very rarely not finish a book. I could not get through half of this one. There is nothing in it about the players of Negro baseball. Mark Ribowsky just wastes your time with his huge vocabulary (keep a dictionary handy, you will need it at least once a paragraph) & his exhaustive knowledge of the soap operas behind the scene of the leagues. He spends no time talking about actually players, teams or the games they played. I am a fan of baseball history, but found this book far removed from baseball and more oriented to the war of words between the early, explotive owners of the Negro league clubs. A history of the game this is not.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 2, 1999
Format: Paperback
Avoid this book at all costs. It has little original research and is literally filled with dozens of factual errors. There are better books on this subject; this isn't one of them!
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again