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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
on April 28, 2009
This work was too basic for someone who is well familiar with exercise and good nutrition, although I did find the beginning pages on metabolism somewhat helpful. I personally was looking for more advanced explanations/ideas compared to the common sense material provided later in the book. I found the author to be somewhat sarcastic instead of sympathetic to people struggling with weight and diet issues; one could definitely sense his frustration. Maybe that would be from years of exposure to needy people who make bad food and exercise choices, and then wonder why they are unhealthy. I wouldn't recommend the book unless the person is looking for square one discussions on jumpstarting good habits.
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on April 10, 2015
I bought this book for my Godson who is in prison. He said it has been very helpful to him and helped him modify his diet as much as possible considering the main part of his food supply is the prison chow hall. I put money on his commissary account so he can buy food that helps him eat better and get the nutrition he needs.
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5 of 9 people found the following review helpful
We all hear people talking about revving up and boosting their metabolism, but what the heck does that mean? Dr. Joseph Lee Klapper sets out to explain it in this book which gives you diet-based strategies for doing exactly that. Since much of my focus is on low-carbohydrate nutrition, I looked to see what he had to say about it in this book.

Turning to pages 171-172, he deals with it directly. Unfortunately, Dr. Klapper falls into the trap of believing complex carbohydrates are somehow immune to the negative impact on health that we know them to be. Instead, he turns his ire and disdain to the "adverse physical effects" of low-carb itself. He incorrectly claims that important healthy foods are "eliminated" and that people should be eating three to five servings of fruit daily to give you plenty of fiber and "smaller spikes in blood glucose levels."

Dr. Klapper, do you know what would happen to my blood sugar and insulin levels if I ate that much fruit, even in the form of low-sugar ones like blueberries and strawberries? It would be through the roof and out-of-control. That's why I need to limit my intake of those supposedly "healthy" foods in my diet. He also promotes white potatoes as healthy because they're low-calories. Big whoop! Just like the fruit, these wreak havoc inside my body and I'm better off avoiding them.

Finally, he says not to add any fat to your diet. Well, it's my fuel source in the absence of carbohydrates, so that's not good advice. I suppose I'll just have to stick to "boosting my metabolism" with what I know best-low-carb all the way, baby!
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