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The Complete Idiot's Guide to New Product Development Paperback – 1997


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 1 pages
  • Publisher: Alpha (1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0028614895
  • ISBN-13: 978-0028614892
  • Product Dimensions: 7.8 x 0.7 x 9.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,979,841 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 17, 1999
Format: Paperback
Leave it to a Certified Management Consultant to put the best advice and writings of Robert Cooper (Winning at New Products, 1993; Portfolio Management for New Products, 1997) into For Dummies "shrink-wrap". The content is not new, there are no new "silver bullet" insights -- just repackaged content from the past decade of PDMA (Product Development Management Association) research and conferences, and Management Roundtable seminars.
I bought my copy for $5.99 at the local discount bookshop. It was worth that just to have an amusing "most all in one place" reference with such amusing jacket promises as: "Idiot-proof steps for making the most of market research"...
Get the real references first.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Stephen Funk on August 5, 2002
Format: Paperback
The "The Complete Idiots Guide to New Product Development" is a broad treatment of the subject of Product Development. It was first published in 1997 so it is relatively up-to-date, but not cutting edge. The book covers many topics from types of new products to Market Research. The book is aimed at small companies and corporations, managers in big companies that want an understanding of the development process, and entrepreneurs. The book tends to address the small business that needs a new product but does not do this sort of thing very often. I believe a manager in a large corporation would be better served by a book like "The PDMA Handbook of New Product Development" that is dedicated to corporate product development processes.
The book has the trappings of the "Idiot's" series of books that I am not a big fan of. That is to say there are cute little cartoons to get a point across along with countless sidebars that highlight ideas from a section. You can get a good idea of the content by skimming these sidebars in a half-hour. There are two Tables of Contents, one simplified and one detailed. There is a pull out reference card. Some of these effects are nice but when you are bombarded by them page after page you begin to feel that this format wastes a lot of space at the expense of content.
The "The Compete Idiot's Guide...." is a good first book to pick up for a small manufacturer with one product and looking to expand. It is not a "how-to" handbook but more of a big picture "why-to" book. There are quite a number of references in the form of periodicals, books, and Internet resources that will lead to further investigation. To remain timely the Internet resources do not have URL's, but more general references that should help begin a search on the Internet.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Steve Cartozian on November 6, 2000
Format: Paperback
This book lives up to its billing as providing quick and easy guidance, having idiot-proof steps and offering down to earth advice. It's ideal for the novice to become acquainted with new product development because it gives the reader a complete overview of it. However, it will be of little help to the seasoned practitioner or someone looking for in-depth information about an aspect of new product development. The only shortcoming of the book was in Chapter 20 about product naming. While this chapter gives an overview of nuances, it does not clarify the few key points needed to have an outstanding name for a new product. Nevertheless, on the whole this book is good for the basics and I would recommend it for this reason.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Bill Bazik on January 23, 2006
Format: Paperback
There is now a small library of books available that claim to guide you through the steps for introducing a new product. Many are designed as texts for college level business courses. If you need good sound advice and guidance now, today, this book may be your ticket. The author is the president of a 28-year-old management consulting company and he has the ability to translate the concepts and terminology involved into everyday language.

The book immediately makes two fundamental points. One, for the last twenty years the failure rate for new products has held at about 90%. Two, whether the new product is created by a large corporation or a one person enterprise, all too often the product is created and then a market is sought. This is the opposite of what the author advocates. He stresses "find things (people) need to buy and then make them."

If the odds against new products are so great, why try? Because success can be highly profitable and it is more fun, more exciting, to lead than to follow. In todays fast pace world you really have little choice; you generate new products or you sink.

As the book title indicates, it is the author's objective to keep you from feeling like an idiot when you try to understand the "nuts and bolts of new product development." Each chapter contains boxes called "Buzzwords" explaining the terms that are in current vogue. Also, boxes labeled "Jump Start" offer key information and the "False Start" boxes cite common mistakes. Each chapter begins with an "In This Chapter" box summarizing what will be discussed. Many examples from the business world are given in the "Prototype" boxes. Each chapter ends with a brief "The Least You Need to Know.
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