Buy Used
$8.76
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Acceptable | Details
Sold by ToyBurg
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: Eligible for FREE Super Saving Shipping! Fast Amazon shipping plus a hassle free return policy mean your satisfaction is guaranteed. Readable copy. All pages complete and readable but expect worn edges, covers, and creases. There is no Amazon condition below acceptable.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Complete Jack Survives Hardcover – Sega, July 1, 2009


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover, Sega
"Please retry"
$5.83 $3.83
Best%20Books%20of%202014
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 80 pages
  • Publisher: Buenaventura Press (July 1, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0980003938
  • ISBN-13: 978-0980003932
  • Product Dimensions: 10.8 x 0.8 x 14.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.3 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,546,902 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Moriarty is probably best known now as a painter, but Jack Survives—his series of short painted comics vignettes about his father's life in the '40s and early '50s—first appeared in RAW magazine and a short book more than 20 years ago. (This edition begins with short essays by Art Spiegelman and Chris Ware in praise of Moriarty's work.) These pieces, none longer than four pages and most only a single page, are generally tiny anecdotes about the way Jack clings to dignity. He's at the mercy of his environment, but he's armed with the props of his generation—coffee, a businessman's suit and hat, the politesse of universal small talk. In a typical story, Jack is awakened by a ringing phone, finds his arms asleep, knocks the receiver onto the floor and lies down to talk into it, only to hear the person on the other end hanging up. The virtues of Moriarty's work, though, are mostly fine-art virtues: immaculately designed compositions that suggest a psychological state; forms suggested by a minimum of thick, tactile marks; a sense of being thoroughly layered and revised. A few word balloons have earlier drafts of dialogue faintly visible through white paint, and this volume includes ravishing pen-and-ink studies for several strips. (July)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

Jerry s comics pages are composed with the elegant precision of an Edward Hopper painting. Self-aware, but never self-conscious; he s a storyteller sharing intimate memories. His sincere love and understanding of comics narrative led him to make comix pages that became central to RAW magazine. -- ART SPIEGELMAN<br /><br />"Being probably the most condensed, poetic effort of modern comics, this edition of Jack Survives may also be the most valuable comic art reprint of the past two decades; Moriarty's work is as fresh, sharp and heartfelt as the day he drew it, and maybe (as is frequently the case with real art) even moreso." --Chris Ware

Jerry s comics pages are composed with the elegant precision of an Edward Hopper painting. Self-aware, but never self-conscious; he s a storyteller sharing intimate memories. His sincere love and understanding of comics narrative led him to make comix pages that became central to RAW magazine. -- ART SPIEGELMAN<br /><br />"Being probably the most condensed, poetic effort of modern comics, this edition of Jack Survives may also be the most valuable comic art reprint of the past two decades; Moriarty's work is as fresh, sharp and heartfelt as the day he drew it, and maybe (as is frequently the case with real art) even moreso." --Chris Ware

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
2
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Josue Menjivar on November 14, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I first purchase the Raw One shot of Jack Survives in the 80's. After reading it I was in love with Moriarty's work. His bold lines and quiet storytelling was incredibly beautiful and much needed in a time when mainstream comics art was beginning to take on too much ugliness. The book was calming and quite inspirational. It left me wanting more. Now years later, this lovely collection comes out and it is worth the money. The art re-scanned and it's lovely to see new images.
Moriarty's work is now given the proper respect it so much deserved.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Thomas Morrison on December 22, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I knew of this artist from RAW Magazine. He also did a RAW One Shot years ago that was really cool so I was excited to find out that I could pick up this book really cheaply on Amazon. I'm not sure if you should call this a comic book or an art book. Though Moriarty does make work that would technically qualify as a comic, it's work is extremely visual almost to the exclusion of story. What little story there is is about Jerry's father Jack and what happens to him in his mundane middle-class suburban life, things like getting his garbage cans hit by a Cadillac, looking up at clouds, and ordering coffee at a bar. The thing that makes them interesting and really gives them weight and power is the way Jerry communicates these events. In the case of the coffee bar, Jerry breaks the words down into syllables like 'cup of coffee' becomes 'cupa coffe e' and 'sugar' becomes 'sc gra rw'. Jerry also often employs this dry wit in his work like in the case of Jack painting a chair while he imagines himself painting a canvas, or when a fly becomes a WWII fighter plane that he swats. It's whimsical stuff done in a great graphic style. And it's all presented on a beautiful large format of 14 1/2 x 10 3/4.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Buffy on September 29, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
For a book with a main character that has such a harsh outlook on life Jack Survives is still full of life. It captures those feeling and brief moments of futility, anger, and bewilderment watching life go by. These are mainly "feel" pieces that give you a brief glimpse into Jack's world. The stories are all very short, many just a page, but it's still a rich world full of texture and emotion. This is the second version of this collection. In the first the artwork was very high contrast black and white linework. In this newer edition it seems the original art pages were scanned and then reproduced so you can now see the underlying pencils, whiteout, smudging, etc. which gives the pages a painterly look. Fantastic book and I hope some day another volume will come along. Recommended.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By eban johnson on September 12, 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
A great artist and a beautiful book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?