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  • The Complete Louis Armstrong & Duke Ellington Sessions
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The Complete Louis Armstrong & Duke Ellington Sessions


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Audio CD, May 10, 1990
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$29.47 $2.42
Audio DVD, April 24, 2001
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Product Details

  • Audio CD (May 10, 1990)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Blue Note Records
  • ASIN: B000005HFV
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #142,145 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Duke's Place
2. I'm Just A Lucky So And So
3. Cottontail
4. Mood Indigo
5. Do Nothin' Till You Hear From Me
6. The Beautiful American
7. Black And Tan Fantasy
8. Drop Me Off At Harlem
9. The Mooche
10. In A Mellow Tone
11. It Don't Mean A Thing
12. Solitude
13. Don't Get Around Much Anymore
14. I'm Beginning To See The Light
15. Just Squeeze Me
16. I Got It Bad And That Ain't Good
17. Azalea

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com

These are the lions in winter, which is not to denigrate the mellow goings-on here, but more to say that this 1961 summit meeting finds the titular giants trés engagé rather than volatile and competitive. The fare is all Ellington tunes, the band is Armstrong's All-Stars, led by Duke on piano. Louis is long past the pyrotechnics of "West End Blues" and the Bessie Smith session, but still offers up some heart-tugging solos that remind us his genius was as much in the expressions of his heart as it was in his embouchure and astonishing instincts (check out "I Got It Bad and That Ain't Good"). Duke plays it gently throughout, an engaging minimalist in this context, and you hear something of the spare impressionism that must have gripped Bill Evans and Vince Guaraldi in their youth. All indirect light and muted repartee, The Complete Sessions surprises in unexpected ways. --David McGee

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Phillip J. Crawford on October 8, 2004
Format: Audio CD
This is my favorite CD. These are the two greatest musicians in jazz history and the chemistry between them is incredible. It's the perfect mixture of Duke's New York sophistication and Louis' New Orleans down-home feeling. There is not a bad note on this record, but my favorite cut is "Azalea." When I close my eyes and listen to Louis sing this little-known Ellington gem, I can feel the muggy Louisiana heat, feel the breeze from slowly turning ceiling fan, and taste the bourbon on the rocks. (As another reviewer said, Louis Armstrong's worst recording is better than 98% of the music currently available on record. The same, I'd say, is true of Duke.) Buy this CD. If it doesn't make you feel good, you must be dead.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 20, 2000
Format: Audio CD
I got this CD for Christmas, and I must say that it was my favorite gift! At the time I got it, I didn't read the other customer reviews, and I was just going to post my thoughts when I saw that the other reviews weren't good at all! The one who said that "Some Jazz Musicians Just Aren't Meant To Make Music Together" or whatever he said was CRAZY! Just relax, and listen to the best version of 'Azalea' yet! It's magic and the two mix together so nicely! I promise you'll be happy with it!
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Paul W Urbahns on January 25, 1999
Format: Audio CD
The idea of getting Duke Ellington and Louis Armstrong together had probably been on many peoples minds, but their schedules just seemed to keep it a dream. That is until Roulette scheduled a date when both Armstrong and Ellington was in town. Some compromises had to be made, the band used was Armstrong's All Stars, and the music is all Ellington. Using the All Stars instead of Ellington's big band kept Armstrong in the small combo setting where he fits best. Ellington replaced Armstrongs normal piano player and everything worked out fine. The songs were well know to the band as several had played in Ellington's big band. This is classic jazz of the highest order. The technical quality of the disk (all in stereo) will not disappoint.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Michael Flower on February 10, 2010
Format: DVD Audio
This recording is my favorite and I have been collecting music for over 40 years. This is not arguably the finest American pianist coupled with the finest American trumpetier. "The Summit" is 2 of America's most established legends ; Jazz icons playing with one of the finest Jazz bands of any age.
To the fellah that gave this recording a 1 star rating , evidently he listens to alot of rap music , case closed. If you cant get religion from this music , think about Joe Zwiebacks' GeraSpeed ..... ? Oh well we all have opinions right ? If you like Jazz music this recording will make you love it ...
Oh Satchamo , where did you go .....?
Savor the Duke tickling the ivories as only he could.
One other thing people should realize is , calling Louis Armstrong an Uncle Tom is taking alot for granted for all the crap he had to endure , to make a better life for his own race. Compared with what AAmericans have today , Satch made strides to make their own life better , and in his own life , he played in the finest halls and ate in the finest restaraunts at a time when that was unheard of in parts of this country. In fact Louis Armstrong is not only noted for being one of the finest American influential musicians , he is beloved as a personality , and if it took ONE or THREE of us awhile to see it , I would say we are talking of youngsters living in Padooka. Boom shaka laka boom !
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Hiram Gomez Pardo HALL OF FAME on October 23, 2005
Format: Audio CD
The recording sessions were made on 3 and 4 April 1961.It results impossible to describe the admirable and instantaneous alchemy and enviable rapport among these two giants.

Duke Ellington was by far the most complete jazz musician in the Century. And Satchmo was (behind Davis of course) was a true living legend of the instrument. Duke, playing the piano gave us a sonorous surprise with his expressive sound.

Every piece is a joy by itself. I 'm just a lucky so and so is true orgiastic blues. Cottontail is a moving theme with Barney Bigard playing clarinet in extraordinary shape,making a superb counterpoint with Satchmo.

Mood Indigo is (who can deny it?) the jewel of the crown. What feeling and expression, what sense of the color and what sublime inspiration; you feel the blues in your veins, and the rough voice of Satchmo confers the piece an additional touch of joy: an extraordinary version without any doubt.

Black and fantasy is another gem. What sensation. It don 't mean a thing is a gorgeous instrumental where you can realize the Dionysian mood of Mr. Satchmo in that studio recording. Solitude is another sensitive blues with a great accompaniment of Duke.

Mort Herbert in bass is splendid too as well as Tommy young at trombone.
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