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The Complete Peanuts 1967-1968 Hardcover – April 23, 2008


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Good Grief! A Missing Strip!
Through a printer's error, one strip from this edition is missing (May 3, 1967) and one is duplicated (May 1, 1967). Unfortunately, all copies of this book contain this mistake. The missing strip will be printed in the next volume (1969-1970), and is also available as a download here, either as a .jpeg (141KB) or a .pdf (110KB).

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 344 pages
  • Publisher: Fantagraphics (April 23, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1560978260
  • ISBN-13: 978-1560978268
  • Product Dimensions: 8.7 x 1.3 x 6.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (24 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #427,086 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

During 1967–68, Snoopy accelerated his transition from simple family pet to World War I fighting ace (and secret agent, and figure skater, and golf pro). Schulz made a few stabs at contemporary relevance by introducing minority kids Franklin and José Peterson, destined respectively to remain a minor character and to disappear altogether, and a “hippie bird” that appears to be a proto-Woodstock. Most of these four-decade-old strips center on such comfortably timeless and familiar devices as Charlie Brown’s haplessness on the baseball diamond, his unrequited love for the Little Red-Haired Girl, and the kite-eating tree. --Gordon Flagg

About the Author

Charles M. Schulz was born November 25, 1922, in Minneapolis. His destiny was foreshadowed when an uncle gave him, at the age of two days, the nickname Sparky (after the racehorse Spark Plug in the newspaper strip Barney Google).In his senior year in high school, his mother noticed an ad in a local newspaper for a correspondence school, Federal Schools (later called Art Instruction Schools). Schulz passed the talent test, completed the course, and began trying, unsuccessfully, to sell gag cartoons to magazines. (His first published drawing was of his dog, Spike, and appeared in a 1937 Ripley's Believe It or Not! installment.) Between 1948 and 1950, he succeeded in selling 17 cartoons to the Saturday Evening Post—as well as, to the local St. Paul Pioneer Press, a weekly comic feature called Li'l Folks. It was run in the women's section and paid $10 a week. After writing and drawing the feature for two years, Schulz asked for a better location in the paper or for daily exposure, as well as a raise. When he was turned down on all three counts, he quit.He started submitting strips to the newspaper syndicates. In the spring of 1950, he received a letter from the United Feature Syndicate, announcing their interest in his submission, Li'l Folks. Schulz boarded a train in June for New York City; more interested in doing a strip than a panel, he also brought along the first installments of what would become Peanuts—and that was what sold. (The title, which Schulz loathed to his dying day, was imposed by the syndicate.) The first Peanuts daily appeared October 2, 1950; the first Sunday, January 6, 1952.Diagnosed with cancer, Schulz retired from Peanuts at the end of 1999. He died on February 13, 2000, the day before Valentine's Day—and the day before his last strip was published—having completed 17,897 daily and Sunday strips, each and every one fully written, drawn, and lettered entirely by his own hand—an unmatched achievement in comics.

Director, screenwriter, and well-known raconteur of American kitsch and camp, John Waters' films include Pink Flamingos and Cecil B. Demented. In 2002 his film Hairspray was made into a hit Broadway musical.

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5 stars
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Great book and I hope everyone gets it.
80s fan
All in all, as always, this volume is a great collection of wonderful Peanuts comic strips.
Timothy Haugh
Linus gets Snoopy to join him at the Pumpkin Patch and all that appears is a bird hippie!
take403

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By R2xA on May 1, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Of course all the praise that the other reviewers are giving the strips themselves is entirely deserved. HOWEVER, in at least some copies of this book, there is an error on page 53: the May 1st strip appears twice and the May 3rd strip is left out. This is a small error, of course, but one that should be noted before purchase! I have spoken to the publisher's customer service department (so far I've been the only one to point out the error) and will update when I hear back from them regarding how widespread this error is and what steps will be made to rectify it.

UPDATE: Customer service has acknowledged the error and stated that the comic strip from May 3rd 1967 will appear as a supplement at the end of the next volume. Presumably (but not certainly), future printings of 1967-1968 will include the correct strip.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By take403 VINE VOICE on April 30, 2008
Format: Hardcover
1967 and 1968 were both great years in Peanuts. This was sort of the beginning of the Peanuts gang of the "later" days. Many of the cartoons found their way in You'll Flip, Charlie Brown, You're Something Else, Charlie Brown, You're You, Charlie Brown and You've Had It, Charlie Brown. Peppermint Patty premiered in 1966 and while a talented athlete, she wasn't the greatest scholar. She introduced one-shot wonder Jose Peterson of Mexican-Swedish descent. She also pressured "Chuck" into trading Snoopy (aka the kid with the big nose). Franklin would make his debut in 1968 as the 1st African American in the Peanuts gang. Featured on the cover is Violet, who though not as crabby as Lucy, could sometimes be even meaner (she'll even "nyah" her mentor!). Snoopy temporarily takes over as baseball manager and won't tolerate any blunders or backtalk (just about everyone on the team gets a kick in the pants, especially if they lose!). Of course, Charlie Brown gently but firmly advises his dog Snoopy not use one of the bases for a pillow, lest "He's gonna stomp right on your stomach! That's what's known as meaningful dialouge!" Snoopy continues his facades of the World War I Flying Ace (the opener for 1967), World Champion Skater who, though Lucy, Violet and Patty have refused to skate with him finds a partner with Peppermint Patty (and Snoopy hopes of getting to Petaluma for the 1968 Olympics), Head Beagle candidate (he was written in across the country in 1968 during the real-life elections!) and introduces a new alter-ego in 1968- the Easter Beagle. Linus, of course, is the only believer in him and has no trouble collecting all the Easter eggs! He has a new hobby, patting birds on the head, which infuriates Lucy.Read more ›
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By John D. Cofield TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on May 4, 2008
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
In this volume of the collected Peanuts strips Charles M. Schulz's world has reached its peak and, just possibly, started to descend. We still enjoy Charlie Brown's neuroses, Lucy's arrogance, Linus' philosophies, and the other inimitable idiosyncracies of the main characters. We laugh at Snoopy's Red Baron, vulture, and other fantasies, but here and there we start to notice a few things that are missing. Shermy, Patty, Violet, and Pigpen rarely show up anymore and when they do, its just as a walk on part to say a few words here and there. Snoopy's imagination is as fascinating as ever, but its beginning to dominate more and more of the strips, to the detriment of some of the other characters. Its a sad foretaste of the later 1970s, when Snoopy and Woodstock (who makes his first appearances, unnamed, in this volume) basically took over the strip!

I don't mean to denigrate this volume, which is full of classic Peanuts humor featuring the characters at their best, like Charlie Brown's encounters with kite-eating trees, Linus' love for the Great Pumpkin, and Lucy's psychiatry booth therapy sessions. I enjoyed the many topical references to life in the 1960s, some of which may puzzle younger readers. How many people know who Twiggy is nowadays? This volume and the two or three preceding it, will probably be regarded as the Peanuts at its best.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Robert Busko VINE VOICE on April 30, 2008
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Yes, the wait between volumes of The Complete Peanuts just seems to get longer and longer. Maybe I should slow down and not read them so quickly.

1967 and 1968 were banner years for Snoopy. Snoopy as the Masked Marvel, an arm wrestling enthusiast, ice skater, and of course, the World War I pilot are just some of his adventures. You may remember that it was almost impossible to go into a story without seeing Snoopy's likeness everywhere. Of course, Franklin made his appearance and yes, it was controversial...some readers on various editorial pages in some major papers objected.

As I read through most of this volume (I haven't finished just yet) I remembered back to 1967 and 1968. How Charles Schulz managed to ignore the heavy topics of the day I will never know. 1968, with the loss of Bobby and MLK were especially painful times. For those of us that were around, reading these volumes can trigger a trip down memory lane. Schulz, in previous volumes did make reference from time to time to some event of the day, usually a sports reference, but he did avoid the heavy stuff.

I'm sure that more than one of you will recall reading these comics in American newspapers in Vietnam.

All in all, for most of us, reading The Complete Peanuts, 1967-1968 will be time well spent.
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Most Recent Customer Reviews


More About the Author

Charles M. Schulz was born November 25, 1922 in Minneapolis. His destiny was foreshadowed when an uncle gave him, at the age of two days, the nickname Sparky (after the racehorse Spark Plug in the newspaper strip Barney Google).

In his senior year in high school, his mother noticed an ad in a local newspaper for a correspondence school, Federal Schools (later called Art Instruction Schools). Schulz passed the talent test, completed the course and began trying, unsuccessfully, to sell gag cartoons to magazines. (His first published drawing was of his dog, Spike, and appeared in a 1937 Ripley's Believe It Or Not! installment.) Between 1948 and 1950, he succeeded in selling 17 cartoons to the Saturday Evening Post--as well as, to the local St. Paul Pioneer Press, a weekly comic feature called Li'l Folks. It was run in the women's section and paid $10 a week. After writing and drawing the feature for two years, Schulz asked for a better location in the paper or for daily exposure, as well as a raise. When he was turned down on all three counts, he quit.

He started submitting strips to the newspaper syndicates. In the spring of 1950, he received a letter from the United Feature Syndicate, announcing their interest in his submission, Li'l Folks. Schulz boarded a train in June for New York City; more interested in doing a strip than a panel, he also brought along the first installments of what would become Peanuts--and that was what sold. (The title, which Schulz loathed to his dying day, was imposed by the syndicate). The first Peanuts daily appeared October 2, 1950; the first Sunday, January 6, 1952.

Diagnosed with cancer, Schulz retired from Peanuts at the end of 1999. He died on February 13, 2000, the day before Valentine's Day--and the day before his last strip was published--having completed 17,897 daily and Sunday strips, each and every one fully written, drawn, and lettered entirely by his own hand--an unmatched achievement in comics.

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The Complete Peanuts 1967-1968
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