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The Complete Peanuts, 1973-1974 Hardcover – September 8, 2009


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 344 pages
  • Publisher: Fantagraphics (September 8, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1606992864
  • ISBN-13: 978-1606992869
  • Product Dimensions: 0.9 x 0.1 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.5 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (25 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #177,162 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“It’s impossible to think of another popular art form that reaches across generations the way the daily comic strip does…at the pinnacle of that long tradition, there was Charles Schulz.” (Seattle Times)

“Charles M. Schulz is my favorite cartoonist, so I was excited to see that the twelfth volume in the series has an introduction by the legendary Billie Jean King... This is a important series of books which I give an ‘A Plus’ and I think it would be the ultimate part of a Peanuts fan’s collection!” (The Catgirl Critics)

“Most comic strips today, especially those that are humor strips, often avoid topical subjects. Schulz embraced the topics of the era. They may date the strip, but it never leaves them outdated. ... Schulz was also not afraid to carry on-going storylines for several days or in some cases, even a couple of weeks. ... [The Complete Peanuts 1973-1974] also features all the favorite subjects like Linus’ annual wait for the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown’s trip to Summer camp, and Sally’s letters to Santa Claus. This is why Peanuts is the greatest strip ever!” (Tim Janson - Newsarama)

“What more can I say about these wonderful collections? I’ve enjoyed each one immensely so far; they make me laugh and grin and even smirk a little from time to time... Top notch book. You can’t have a much better time than reading these collections. Highly recommended.” (Todd Klein, comic book letterer, designer, and writer)

“Really strong stuff here, including the "Charlie Brown wears a sack on his head to summer camp" sequence, surely the "Poison River" of Peanuts.” (Patrick Markfort, - Articulate Nerd)

“Fantagraphics Books continues its series devoted to chronologically packaging the strip and has not missed a step along the way. ... I’m pleased to inform that the latest edition, the twelfth in the series, is as lovingly curated as the first.” (Dw. Dunphy - Popdose)

About the Author

Charles M. Schulz was born November 25, 1922, in Minneapolis. His destiny was foreshadowed when an uncle gave him, at the age of two days, the nickname Sparky (after the racehorse Spark Plug in the newspaper strip Barney Google).In his senior year in high school, his mother noticed an ad in a local newspaper for a correspondence school, Federal Schools (later called Art Instruction Schools). Schulz passed the talent test, completed the course, and began trying, unsuccessfully, to sell gag cartoons to magazines. (His first published drawing was of his dog, Spike, and appeared in a 1937 Ripley's Believe It or Not! installment.) Between 1948 and 1950, he succeeded in selling 17 cartoons to the Saturday Evening Post—as well as, to the local St. Paul Pioneer Press, a weekly comic feature called Li'l Folks. It was run in the women's section and paid $10 a week. After writing and drawing the feature for two years, Schulz asked for a better location in the paper or for daily exposure, as well as a raise. When he was turned down on all three counts, he quit.He started submitting strips to the newspaper syndicates. In the spring of 1950, he received a letter from the United Feature Syndicate, announcing their interest in his submission, Li'l Folks. Schulz boarded a train in June for New York City; more interested in doing a strip than a panel, he also brought along the first installments of what would become Peanuts—and that was what sold. (The title, which Schulz loathed to his dying day, was imposed by the syndicate.) The first Peanuts daily appeared October 2, 1950; the first Sunday, January 6, 1952.Diagnosed with cancer, Schulz retired from Peanuts at the end of 1999. He died on February 13, 2000, the day before Valentine's Day—and the day before his last strip was published—having completed 17,897 daily and Sunday strips, each and every one fully written, drawn, and lettered entirely by his own hand—an unmatched achievement in comics.

More About the Author

Charles M. Schulz was born November 25, 1922 in Minneapolis. His destiny was foreshadowed when an uncle gave him, at the age of two days, the nickname Sparky (after the racehorse Spark Plug in the newspaper strip Barney Google).

In his senior year in high school, his mother noticed an ad in a local newspaper for a correspondence school, Federal Schools (later called Art Instruction Schools). Schulz passed the talent test, completed the course and began trying, unsuccessfully, to sell gag cartoons to magazines. (His first published drawing was of his dog, Spike, and appeared in a 1937 Ripley's Believe It Or Not! installment.) Between 1948 and 1950, he succeeded in selling 17 cartoons to the Saturday Evening Post--as well as, to the local St. Paul Pioneer Press, a weekly comic feature called Li'l Folks. It was run in the women's section and paid $10 a week. After writing and drawing the feature for two years, Schulz asked for a better location in the paper or for daily exposure, as well as a raise. When he was turned down on all three counts, he quit.

He started submitting strips to the newspaper syndicates. In the spring of 1950, he received a letter from the United Feature Syndicate, announcing their interest in his submission, Li'l Folks. Schulz boarded a train in June for New York City; more interested in doing a strip than a panel, he also brought along the first installments of what would become Peanuts--and that was what sold. (The title, which Schulz loathed to his dying day, was imposed by the syndicate). The first Peanuts daily appeared October 2, 1950; the first Sunday, January 6, 1952.

Diagnosed with cancer, Schulz retired from Peanuts at the end of 1999. He died on February 13, 2000, the day before Valentine's Day--and the day before his last strip was published--having completed 17,897 daily and Sunday strips, each and every one fully written, drawn, and lettered entirely by his own hand--an unmatched achievement in comics.

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5 stars
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See all 25 customer reviews
Peanuts was one of the greatest comic strips of all time.
Johnny Heering
The most famous of these is probably "Mr. Sack," in which Charlie Brown begins to envision every round object he discovers as a baseball.
Christopher Barat
THE COMPLETE PEANUTS 1973-1974 is the 12th Volume in the complete "Peanuts" collection being published by Fantagraphics Books.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Christopher Barat on October 9, 2009
Format: Hardcover
This latest collection's cover (Woodstock's tiny head casting a far-too-large shadow) and introduction (by Billie Jean King, who, unlike a number of the folks whom Fantagraphics has dragooned into providing PEANUTS-related musings, actually knew and was good friends with Charles Schulz) are first-rate, and several of this volume's continuities are among the most ambitious and/or outlandish "Sparky" ever concocted, but one could reasonably argue that Schulz' creation reached a "tipping point" in the mid-70s. Whether it was due to the overuse of Snoopy and Woodstock, the introduction of several less-than-stellar long-running gag themes, or an increasing amount of reliance on what one might call "the PEANUTS of the absurd," one can detect a certain coarsening of the master's touch. For sure, the intelligentsia of the era had moved on to new favorites, particularly DOONESBURY, perhaps reacting to Schulz' refusal to touch upon the partisan rancor and ugliness of the Watergate era. Schulz, who'd made frequent references to Vietnam, hippie culture, space travel, feminism, and the like just a few short years before, completely eschews topical material here, apart from one stand-alone gag in which Sally worries that her school desk has been "bugged." Instead, he indulges in such transient personal passions as running Snoopy through a large number of gags involving tennis, the artist's latest pastime. PEANUTS was never truly about "relevance," but Schulz' decision to shrink the borders of his "universe" marked a definite shift in his thinking. Many later references to pop culture in the strip would be much more exploitative in nature, in the manner of a "hit-and-run" late-night comedian, and lack the cleverness and subtlety of Schulz' work of the mid-50s to the early 70s.Read more ›
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By take403 VINE VOICE on October 5, 2009
Format: Hardcover
So said the jealous Lucy who's had to play 2nd (or more like 1,000,000th) fiddle to Beethoven in Schroeder's eyes. This is one of the stories to look forward to in this volume. I could've quoted Woodstock who dons the cover of this one but I didn't think "!!!!!" was too memorable a title for this review. This particular volume is known for its extended stories. One of the 1st features Charlie Brown getting a celebratory dinner for being such a great manager, complete with a visit from Charlie Brown's hero Joe Shlabotnik (alas, the event becomes a fiasco, thanks to Marcie's big mouth!). Since Billie Jean King appropriately wrote the foreward, it's only fair that Snoopy tries his hand with tennis (to be honest, I'm not sure whether or not the cartoon where Snoopy double-faults and throws a MacEnroe temper is in this volume or not). Another story featuring the blockhead features Charlie Brown's fascination with baseballs (to quote the band Yes, "lose one onto the heart of the sunrise," you'll figure it out) and goes to camp, this time to become a hero and earns the nickname "Sack." Peppermint Patty tries her hand at football, 1st with Chuck, 2nd with the kid with the big nose. Snoopy tries beating Hank Aaron's baseball record (I remember this cartoon as a kid, wondering what the heck all those tally marks were doing on his doghouse). Linus teaches Snoopy a well-deserved lesson on the evils of blanket-napping! Not much mention of the little red-haired girl but a girl named Lorretta shows up (1st she ignores him at a party then tries to get his attention, but not for reasons he expects). Peppermint Patty prepares herself for a skating competition and Marcie tries making her a costume (which looks like a cross between a straight jacket and a ghost suit!).Read more ›
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Jeegisha Panchal on August 23, 2009
Format: Hardcover
I love this volume. My favorite stories are when Rerun gets involved in a betting scandal and Mr. Sack sequence. Classic! If you are a fan of Peanuts, get this volume. You won't be sorry.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By 80s fan on August 26, 2009
Format: Hardcover
Two more great years of Peanuts. We get to see Rerun but he is only in 25 comics. Peppermint Patty is in 147 strips but Marcie is in 74 pretty half as much as Peppermint Patty but Marcie does join the cast. Peppermint Patty finds out that Snoopy is a beagle and she gets her first D-.

Snoopy becomes a beagle scout. Lucy throws Schroeder's piano down the sewer. Lucy and Peppermint Patty go to get there ears pieced. We see very, very, very little of Violet, Patty, Freida, Roy, and 5. There are at least 12 comics that were never before reprinted including the one with Peppermint Patty and Marcie and PP saying that her father is making her go on bonehead lunch. Great book, bring on the next one.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By romevi VINE VOICE on May 20, 2010
Format: Hardcover
Another great compilation of Schulz's masterpiece. As with the other volumes, I enjoyed this every page of the way.
Throughout 1973 to 1974, Schulz begins to experiment and strengthen one of his newer cast members: Peppermint Patty. Mind you, there already was a Patty from the earlier strips, so Schulz dubbed this one "Peppermint," and it's this Patty that we all know.

From her struggles with winning Charlie Brown's affection to accepting her "normal" features, I feel that Peppermint Patty is an almost complete version of Brown as female, albeit some minor idiosyncrasies, such as her being a better athlete. She's one of more insecure and depressed in the Peanuts gang, so she offers a different perspective of the morbid whenever Charlie isn't present.

Besides being a great addition to the comics, the cover features my favorite Peanuts character!
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