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The Complete Personal Memoirs of Ulysses S. Grant Paperback – October 1, 2013


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 436 pages
  • Publisher: Ulysses Press (October 1, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1619491850
  • ISBN-13: 978-1619491854
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 1 x 10 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (39 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #270,158 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"The best [memoirs] of any general's since Caesar."   --Mark Twain

"A unique expression of the national character....[Grant] has conveyed the suspense which was felt by himself and his army and by all who believed in the Union cause. The reader finds himself...on edge toknow how the Civil War is coming out." --Edmund Wilson

About the Author

Ulysses S. Grant (1822-1885), the eighteenth president of the United States, graduated from West Point, fought in the Mexican War, and led the Union army to victory in the Civil War. James M. McPherson, George Henry David Professor of History at Princeton University, is the author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning BATTLE CRY OF FREEDOM.

Customer Reviews

Long but worth it...very detailed.
roger surratt
His writing style was very direct and succinct, but inclusive of the life teeming around him.
Medici
U.S. Grant shows the definitive strategy that ended the civil war.
Roy Ewers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By john purcell on September 21, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Very late in life, destitute and sick with the cancer that killed him, U.S. Grant penned his personal memoirs. He focused almost exclusively on the war years, with some mention of his youth and early years in the old army. You could read this book and not notice that he had ever become President, that job must have been an afterthought and clearly not a role he relished. Like many of us, Grant was terrified of public speaking and interacting with large groups. Even as President he generally avoided such requirements, preferring to issue orders or read a brief statement. Not sure that would work these days.

Grant's humor, compassion, humility, and honesty come out in this book. Since it was the end of his life and many of his colleagues had already gone to collect their just rewards, Grant does not pull any punches in his opinions of the War Department leadership and officers and some of the politicians who crossed his path during the War. Grant was also a very modest man. When hostilities commenced in 1861 he offered his services to the local politicians, with no hard sell of his military experience and capabilities. He is also clear in that he was not a supporter of the goals when he served in the Mexican War but went along with the orders provided him.

Perhaps the experience that most grew his character were his years out of the army, when he was leading a series of failed business and farming ventures, reduced to cutting firewood for his neighbors on some days. Grant also took the opportunity here to set the story straight on some War stories that would have been good stories if only they were true.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Just A Buyer on October 18, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I learned of a General Grant who was far different than I had thought. I believe he wrote an honest view of himself and others. One thing that impressed me is not only did he fight he had a broad understanding of what was needed to win the war in the West and East. I've always known he was a good General but now rate him as a Great General. In the East he was highly respected by his men who cheered him after The Battle of The Wilderness when he headed South after Lees' Army. It had been a terrible fight but they cheered him. Why?? Because they had realized Lee must be defeated to win and the only way to do that was not to withdraw but pursue him. Grant was the first Northern General not to withdraw after a battle and they recognized Grant meant to win and knew how too. They never fought harder for any General than him. He was a great judge of other Commanders and didn't put himself above other sucessful ones, giving them credit for their actions. One simple thing he wrote impressed me, "Many thought Robert E Lee couldn't be defeated. But I knew Lee." It hit me like a ton of bricks that this man was not afraid of Lee. Later after defeating him he did show respect and compassion for him and his men. His Memoirs made me take a deeper look at this man. I when young remembered him being called a "Butcher". Reading another book about him I learned Grant lost a total of only 15% of his federal troops in 4 years, approx. 94,000 killed or wounded. While Robert E. Lee lost 20% of his men or approx 121,000 killed or wounded which was far more than any Civil war General. With Lee losing 80,000 in killed and wounded in his first fourteen months of Command and that equaled the number he had started with originally. Those facts changed my view of U.S. Grant.Read more ›
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Medici on January 14, 2012
Format: Paperback
This book changed my notion of history. Ulysses S. Grant describes a chunk of the mid-1800's in his memoir, and thus gives the reader a window into this time period. Although, of course, the Civil War battles and battle preparations are of utmost importance, I enjoyed his running commentary about horses, railroads and river navigation even more. His writing style was very direct and succinct, but inclusive of the life teeming around him. He was an expert quartermaster in the army, could remember the topography of a map after seeing it once and had a way with horses. You really get to know his world and after reading this book I wanted to read other first hand accounts of life in the 19th century, and have. Thus I discovered that Teddy Roosevelt is just about the best writer who was president, after Grant. And learned alot about wolves, cougars and buffalo in one of his books.

This book has been the greatest eye opener for me. I guess I thought that people of history are somehow different than people of our times. But a memoir can really give an intimate view of its time, so you can understand and like the people living then and put yourself in their milieu. I enjoyed that experience.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By John M Grimshaw on March 8, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The first memoir I've read. My reading was encouraged by the Lincoln movie and the Doris Kearns Goodwin book a "Team of Rivals". I was curious about Grant's evaluation of Lincoln and it was especially meaningful to read his thoughts first hand. The book read as though Grant was explaining the Civil War to me. I was fascinated by his description of events at Appomattox. While reading this book it would be helpful to have a campaign map to follow his assessment of the terrain and flow of the battle.A very important book.
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