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The Complete Priest's Handbook, Second Edition (Advanced Dungeons & Dragons: Player's Handbook Rules Supplement #2113 Paperback – June 30, 1990


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 128 pages
  • Publisher: Wizards of the Coast; 2 edition (June 30, 1990)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0880388188
  • ISBN-13: 978-0880388184
  • Product Dimensions: 10.5 x 8.2 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 2.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #548,642 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

For players, they will probably get little use out of it.
Christopher Dudley
If this house rule is not accepted, the standard "Cleric" from the player's handbook is stronger than just about any clerics from this book.
SedgeHawks
Numerous superior 2nd edition products are out of print, yet this one still exists.
Ben Bankston

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 17, 1999
Format: Paperback
the book lacked most of what has made the other additions to this series great. As stated before you can probably find all the info included therein as well as some more useful stuff in the Faiths and Avatars as well as the Spells and Magic supplement. IT's ok if you just want to play a boring cleric( but then again wouldn't you just be better off taking the example from the players handbook). Take my word for it, save yourself the money to spend on something that would be really worth your while, but if you have to look at it just flip through it, you can get the important stuff outta there fairly quick.
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16 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Christopher Dudley on January 10, 2000
Format: Paperback
Where 2nd Edition AD&D endows fighters with the ability to (at first level) swing a longsword in each hand, potentially doing 28 points of damagae in a single round without counting Strength bonuses, the 2nd Edition Priests handbook cuts a Priest's power in half. I didn't find a single Priesthood that allowed it's followers to cast spells from all spheres, and many were reduced in combat ability. The special abilities added often come at the cost of the Priest's ability to Turn Undead creatures.

In short, ignore the sample priesthoods, or at least give them more spheres and/or abilities, if you want your players to still be your friends.

The rest of the book is good. It provides mythos creation guidelines, so if you don't wish to play in Forgotten Realms or Greyhawk, you can create your own pantheon and mythology using the guidelines in this book.

The kits are not all that great, one of them even relying on the heavily flawed Martial Arts system from the Player's Handbook. But with a little tinkering, you can use them. Just about everything in here needs a little work, but it's not unusable.

It's a good reference for DMs who are creating their game world. For players, they will probably get little use out of it.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 10, 1999
Format: Paperback
Discounting the uninteresting or unusable parts (which still take up about half the book), The Complete Priest's Handbook is a pretty useful source. The main problem is in the half the book that's taken up by flotsam and fluff.
The reader from Detroit was very right in saying that "the... specialty priests are vastly underpowered compared to the priests in any other AD&D work"; hence why it's necessary to tweak and add to them extensively. The powers are also so restricting that they're worth ignoring entirely; the only thing they'll do is make dozens of AD&D pantheons clones of each other.
The main purpose of this book is to give some ideas on what gods may exist and what their priesthoods are like. If you do buy this and use it in your campaign, however, DON'T USE ANY OF THE SPECIALTY PRIESTHOODS AS IS... It would be an insult to priests everywhere!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 25, 1998
Format: Paperback
The Complete Priest's Handbook is one of those TSR works that is almost completely replaceable with other works.
First, the Faith creation system and specialty priests are vastly underpowered compared to the priests in any other AD&D work. You're better off using the class customization rules from Player's Option: Spells & Magic, or even raiding a world-specific work and tweaking the priests.
The kits are generally boring, and most are essentially identical to similarly-named fighter or wizard kits. The personalities are okay, but any experienced roleplayer won't need them, whereas an inexperienced player would be better off looking at potrayals of clergymen in general fiction for archtypes.
Finally, the equipment and combat rules are essentially identical to those in the Complete Fighter's Handbook.
In short, it isn't very useful.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By T. Chapman Wing on May 3, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I'm a total sucker for the Complete series, but the Complete Priest's Handbook is the one that I feel is absolutely necessary. Otherwise, you just have the joe cleric--boring, and thematically inexplicable. Now you have all kinds of different thematically-consistent powers, weapon/armor combinations, spell access, priestly duties, and ways to round out your priest character. You can use this book equally well if you're really into roleplaying a pacifist, a nature lover, a demihuman protector of the community, a killer death priest, or anything in between.

I don't play in Forgotten Realms anymore (there, the Faiths & Avatars book replaces this one, in the FR context only), but even when I did, I like the Complete Priest better. It details dozens of specific mythoi that are still general enough to manifest themselves in any kind of campaign--it gives themes and powers, but no actual deities, so you can import them however you like.

The Fighting-Monk kit is also the 2nd edition's answer to the 1st edition Monk class, and works just fine (but I recommend using the martial arts system detailed in the Complete Ninja's Handbook for that part of it).
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 8, 2003
Format: Paperback
I would have to agree with others that the Kit's in this book are a little weak. In playability as well as game terms. However, the Mythos section gave me many ideas for creating specialty priest's for games that I run as well as characters for other's. It works well if you ignore the sample priesthoods and just use the guidlines it gives to come up with new ideas.
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