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553 of 576 people found the following review helpful
on March 22, 2009
Format: Kindle Edition
This book included 12 adventures:
1. A Scandal in Bohemia
2. The Red-Headed League
3. A Case of Identity
4. The Boscombe Valley Mystery
5. The Five Orange Pips
6. The Man with the Twisted Lip
7. The Adventure of the Blue Carbuncle
8. The Adventure of the Speckled Band
9. The Adventure of the Engineer's Thumb
10. The Adventure of the Noble Bachelor
11. The Adventure of the Beryl Coronet
12. The Adventure of the Copper Beeches

Great classic literature. I really enjoy reading Holmes and Watson's adventures, solving the mystery, and putting the puzzles together.
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226 of 235 people found the following review helpful
Format: Kindle EditionVerified Purchase
This free Kindle download is the prelude to The Return of Sherlock Holmes. Arthur Conan Doyle's timeless tales are perfect for Kindle and, actually, the Kindle's electronic voice does an admirable job of reading them to you!

Special thanks to Eileen T for posting the list of stories contained within!

The only downside to this free Kindle download is that it doesn't have linked Table of Contents. So how do you quickly skip to a chapter later in the book?

Elementary my dear Watson! (-:

Pick a unique word from the story title. Click MENU > "Search this book"
Then type the most unique words from the title. Alas, this doesn't always work, and I can't figure out why. A new mystery! In the meantime, enjoy the classics....
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267 of 279 people found the following review helpful
on August 9, 2000
Format: Mass Market PaperbackVerified Purchase
In Sherlock Holmes, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle created one of the world's best known and (arguably) most fully realized literary characters. Since Doyle's death, there have been plenty of people writing knockoffs of his stories. But with rare exceptions (Nicholas Meyer comes to mind), most have not lived up to the high standards Doyle set in at least the best of his Holmes tales.

This volume includes the complete canon of Doyle's original stories -- four novels and fifty-six short stories, from "A Study in Scarlet" to "His Last Bow." While there are a handful of cases that bore significantly on international affairs (e.g. "The Bruce-Partington Plans"), most of them are of interest simply because of that touch of the _outre_ that Holmes loved so much and that provided such stimulating material to the ideal reasoner.

There are some clunkers in the canon, of course, but the vast majority of these stories -- especially the earliest ones -- are just brilliant. If you are reading them for the first time, I envy you; the sturdy Dr. John Watson is about to introduce you to a new world, a world of Victorian gaslight and Stradivarius violins, of hansom cabs and cries of "The game's afoot!"

For in reading this volume you will find such classic tales as "The Red-Headed League" and "The Man With The Twisted Lip"; you will encounter the famous dog that did nothing in the night-time ("Silver Blaze") and several versions of Holmes's favorite maxim ("When you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth"); and you will meet one of the most fascinating and memorable characters ever to spring from the printed page: Holmes himself.

Perhaps most importantly, you will catch a glimpse of the world as an ideal reasoner might see it -- not as a grab-bag of random atomic facts in which our own role is negligible, but as a vast interconnected whole in which each part bears some necessary relation to the rest, and in which the reasoned pursuit of justice in all matters great and small is the business of each and every one of us.

Incidentally, the twentieth-century philosopher who presented that vision most consistently and cogently is, to my own mind, Brand Blanshard, and any Holmes readers who are interested in philosophy may enjoy investigating Blanshard's works as well.
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71 of 74 people found the following review helpful
on September 20, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Every Holmes fan has more than one version of the Canon, and this should be among the collection as your standard 'reading copy.' Until I discovered this edition, my favorite reading version was the 1970s Ballantine editions (with great introductions ranging from Joe Gores to Ellery Queen to P.G. Wodehouse)--but sadly, that edition is out of print, and never contained the final two Conan Doyle books anyway. This oversized paperback aptly fills the modern role of a definitive edition.
As for the stories themselves, you simply can't go wrong in rediscovering or reading Holmes for the first time. Sure, Conan Doyle's stories sometimes lacked an internal logic (my favorite tale, 'The Adventure of the Red-Headed League," is riddled with plot holes). But there's a reason these have remained as classics that have never gone out of popular fashion, over a hundred years since publication: they're entertaining, cleverly written, wonderfully detailed, and often edge-of-your-seat thrilling. Included are all 57 short stories (ideal for a quite hour in your armchair, or for a commute during which you can escape to Victorian London) and the four longer novels (the most popular of which is "The Hound of the Baskervilles," but don't pass up the sublime and underrated "The Valley of Fear"). This is the ideal book for a long vacation (especially to London!), and, if I were stranded on a desert island, this is the book I'd want most with me (well, after that 'How to Build an Island-Escaping Raft from Coconuts' book).
If you haven't discovered Sherlock Holmes, this is the edition of his adventures to buy. If you read Conan Doyle long ago but haven't picked him up since, this is the edition to buy. If you've got several other Sherlock Holmes books on your shelf but want a single-volume complete edition, this is the edition to buy. As it's been said, 'There's no police like Holmes.'
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97 of 103 people found the following review helpful
on February 23, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Back in the 1990s, I discovered the excellent Jeremy Brett filmed episodes of Sherlock Holmes...and that experience led me to the stories themselves. I then ended up reading all 56 short stories and 4 novels in short order.

There's a reason the character of Sherlock Holmes is remembered, some 125 years after his debut!!!

As one preface mentioned, Conan Doyle did not know how to write a dull sentence. Which is a very true statement. Virtually all of these stories are gripping ones, but even the lesser ones -- mainly the ones Conan Doyle wrote toward the end -- are so atmospheric, that your enjoyment is scarcely lessened.

Read these tales!! You won't be disappointed!!!
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91 of 98 people found the following review helpful
Format: Kindle EditionVerified Purchase
English history is served up along with the amazing mystery stories. I enjoy the pictures of daily life...the maid bringing in lunch to Holmes on a pre-arranged schedule, passing the street vendors and beggars, imagining the opium den frequented by addicts, vivid descriptions of period clothing, transportation and commerce slipped seamlessly into the tales. I read this often to refresh the imagery in my mind.
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65 of 69 people found the following review helpful
on May 10, 2010
Format: Kindle EditionVerified Purchase
This is a review for the Kindle version.

The table of contents, yes it is really is there, is nicer than the
over version(s) that I have previously bought.

So far I have found no formating errors.

And the use of font sizes looks better than other version(s).

Both of my 20 something year old sons and myself are enjoying
reading this together. My wife is about ready to join in too.

Nice to be reading Sherlock Holmes again.
And how are you going to beat 99 cents!

This is what Kindle is all about!
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355 of 403 people found the following review helpful
on January 2, 2010
Format: Kindle EditionVerified Purchase
I love the Sherlock Holmes mysteries and have enjoyed many a bedtime story with the great sleuth, so it was with great anticipation that I purchased the Kindle version of this volume of short stories. I was sadly disappointed, though, to find that apparently the publishers did not understand the audience that buys short story collections; they did not bother to include something most basic and needful in an anthology - a table of contents. Without a table of contents the reader has no choice but to start at page one and hit "Next Page" hundreds of times to access stories further into the volume. This is a ridiculous oversight that completely ruins the experience of picking up a good collection of short stories and choosing a story to read at a whim based on the title. If one cannot see all of the titles in an included table of contents, then one is forced to start at the beginning and read them all chronologically. This may work in a novel, but it decidely does not work as a format for a collection of short stories. Please actually keep the reader in mind the next time that you publish a Kindle version of short stories. Include a table of contents.
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33 of 34 people found the following review helpful
on January 3, 2010
Format: Kindle EditionVerified Purchase
Spending so much of my day plugged into the internet, peering at my iPhone, staring at Excel spreadsheets, it has been an absolute pleasure reading The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes(on my Kindle, I must admit). I am reminded, in adventure after adventure, that there is no substitute for a sharp mind and astute observation. As I watch the master investigator calmly solve the most "singular" of mysteries through the eyes of Dr. James Watson, I almost want to myself be transported back to 19th century London.

If you haven't read any of Conan Doyle's stories, they are worth perusing. I only read a dozen of Holmes' adventures. But in those stories, I grew intimately close with both the detective and his trusty sidekick and doctor-cum-biographer, Watson. I came to admire Holmes' heroic stoicism, encyclopedic memory, and sharp wit.

Each of the adventures follows a somewhat similar plot structure. The adventure opens with a shot into Watson's or Holmes' personal life. You might hear briefly about Watson's life as a doctor, or get a glimpse of Holmes' tobacco, alcohol, or cocaine habits (yes, the rumors are true--Holmes does cocaine). At some point, Watson ends up at Holmes' pad on Baker Street. Both men are then found lounging, Holmes in his "dressing gown," both men likely smoking, drinking, and enjoying a fine meal, usually arms' length from a cozy fire.

Watson, the narrator, will then tell us how, in all of his time with Holmes, the case he is about to elucidate is the most "singular" one yet. Then one of them will see or hear someone approaching their home base; inevitably, the bell will ring and in will enter yet another all-but-hopeless client. We'll get a detailed description of the client's physical appearance, from the clothes on his or her back to the flushness of the face. We'll also always get an idea of what class the client falls into; most regularly, the clients are from higher classes. The client will give us a detailed account of his or her problems as Holmes and Watson listen intently. It is here that the reader is supposed to do the detective work to piece together clues to solve the case. Of course, most of what the client tells us seems unrelated and inane; Holmes will remind us that the simplest cases are the hardest ones, and the smallest of details often the most important.

In most cases, the client has a suspicion that the police's conclusions on the case were flawed. In almost every case, the police were consulted and ended up being wrong indeed. Holmes generally requires a trip to the crime scene, sometimes in costume, and the readers have the privilege to join him with Watson. But most trips are simply chances for Holmes to confirm what he already suspected. Guns may be drawn, extreme danger is almost always encountered, and Holmes emerges the hero. Holmes has a penchant for withholding his conclusions from us until the very end of the story, however, so as the reader follows Holmes' movements at the crime scenes, the reader must do some sleuthing as well.

Holmes will finally tell us what actually happened, and the seemingly innocuous clues from earlier in the chapter prove to be essential to the weaving of the truth. Holmes prefers to strike a deal with the crimes' perpetrators rather than offering them to the police. The clients offer to give Holmes unlimited reward for a job well done, and Holmes calmly requests only that which will defer the cost of his work. He gets enough pleasure out of a job professionally well-done.

Because of the similarities between stories, I recommend taking Holmes in limited doses. But his is a very powerful medicine, one that rejuvenates the mind and strengthens the character. As an example of someone who betters the world by doing what he loves, Sherlock Holmes is a timeless hero.
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35 of 37 people found the following review helpful
Format: Kindle Edition
This is a Kindle-specific review by AGB.

Value for money: an excellent discount set (but with a few faults) of one of the classics of literature: the 4 long novels and the 5 volumes of short stories.

Presentation and Format: clean and attractive, with the text set fully justified..

Cover etc.: there's a simple, attractive cover, though no further illustrations.

Opening Linked Table of Contents: there's a full Linked ToC to either the beginning of each of the novels, or each of the short stories. There's an error in the ToC of Volume 6, "The Return of Sherlock Holmes" - avid readers will be surprised at the inclusion of a hitherto unknown Holmes story, "Murder in Westminster"! This is in fact simply the second half of the previous, correct story, "The Adventure of the Second Stain" ("Murder...." is a newspaper headline included in the text of the story...).
(Note: the "Linked ToC" enables you skip to predetermined points in the file - individual books, chapter openings etc. Without a good one, a long or very technical work can be tiresome to navigate on the Kindle.)

Metadata
("Metadata" refers to some hidden coding that publishers insert into the text file to enable Kindle to list and display correctly the essentials of the book - Author, Title etc. Kindle owners are able to correct indexing errors - which are very, very common - via a 3rd party software program called "Mobi2Mobi", but is both annoying and time-consuming to have to do so. )

Author: incorrectly set to Index under "A" for Arthur..... Strictly speaking, he should be under "D" for Doyle, though many will prefer "C" for Conan Doyle....
(General Note: although Kindle displays author names in the form "Bram Stoker", in order for him to be positioned in the Kindle Author List under "S" for Stoker rather than "B" for Bram, the Metadata must be set by the publisher in the form "Stoker, Bram". )

Title: it's a quibble, but the set will Index under "C" for Complete.... I'd prefer "S" for, say, "Sherlock Holmes: The Complete 9 Volumes"
(General Note: although Kindle knows to ignore an opening "The" in a title, it simple takes the first proper word in the metadata title to index the book. Publishers often include words before the proper title of the book that lead Kindle to place it misleadingly in your displayed Title List.)

Search: works properly.
Lookup: works properly.
(General Note: for reasons I don't yet quite understand, a number of Kindle format books - usually at the less expensive end of the range - don't allow Search or Lookup to work properly.)
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