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106 of 110 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Review for book, not contents of book.
I think Poe's genius hardly needs discussion on this forum.
So, I offer a small review on the physical book itself.

As another reviewer mentioned, there are no annotations.
You will have to translate (or find on the Net) the Latin,
the French, etc., yourself, though you can skip them and
still understand the story. I'm no Poe scholar, so...
Published on September 15, 2004 by V. Patel

versus
16 of 20 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Unorganized impossible to navigate
Save your dollar. The kindle edition does not have any ability to easily navigate. You will essentially have to manually wade through the extensive collectioin of Poe stories which is cubersome and ineffecient. As well, this edition was linked next to a volume for stories and poems and the kindle edition only has stories.
Published on August 17, 2011 by M. Pete


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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars One of America's Finest, April 5, 2012
By 
J C E Hitchcock (Tunbridge Wells, Kent, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
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This review is from: Complete Stories and Poems of Edgar Allan Poe (Hardcover)
Before reading this collection, I knew Edgar Allan Poe as a poet and as the author of the Gothic horror stories which after his death were collected as "Tales of Mystery and Imagination", although he himself never published a collection with this title. I was therefore surprised to discover that his range of subject-matter was considerably wider than this and that the majority of his short stories do not fall within this category; he was also a prolific author of satirical and humorous tales and of what are referred to as "fantasies".

There is perhaps a reason why Poe is today best known for a few works making up only a small part of his output. Reading his dramatic fragment "Politian", a fusty cod-Shakespearean blank-verse tragedy set in Renaissance Italy, I quickly understood why, after a few scenes, Poe abandoned not only the play itself but any idea of making a career as a dramatist. (He never wrote for the stage again). About his leaden tales of humour and satire the kindest thing to say would be that most of them clearly reveal just why Poe is not principally remembered today as a humorist or satirist, although there are occasionally some flashes of interest. One that caught my attention was "The 1,002nd Tale of Scheherazade", which uses the language of the Arabian Nights fairy-tale to inform the reader of some of the wonders of nineteenth-century science and technology, the twist being that fact is indeed stranger than fiction and that when Scheherazade recounts scientific fact rather than fantasy nobody believes her.

This volume also includes Poe's only novel "The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket". This starts out as a gripping seafaring yarn about a young man who stows away on a Nantucket whaling ship, and whose experiences include mutiny, shipwreck and cannibalism. The second half of the story, however, turns into something closer to science fiction, as Pym is rescued by a ship on a voyage to explore the Antarctic, a region of the globe still largely unknown when the book was published in 1838. According to Poe Antarctica is not an ice-covered continent but an open sea with a relatively mild climate, which gets steadily milder the closer one approaches to the South Pole, and containing a number of islands populated by dark-skinned savages.

Poe can be seen as a pioneer of science fiction, although the advance of scientific knowledge since his day means that what was once speculative fiction is now either banal fact or else completely implausible. Readers in the 1840s might have been persuaded that it was possible to travel from the Earth to the Moon by balloon, as happens to the protagonist of "The Unparalleled Adventure of One Hans Pfaal", but modern readers are unlikely to be so gullible, and the ending, in which Poe pulls the rug out from under his readers' feet by revealing the whole thing to be a hoax, will not come as a surprise.

Another genre in which Poe acted as a pioneer was that of the detective story. Although he only wrote three stories in this genre, his hero C. Auguste Dupin anticipates Sherlock Holmes in his ability to solve crimes by deductive reasoning. Like Holmes, and a number of other fictional sleuths such as Hercule Poirot, Dupin is not a police officer but a gentlemanly amateur. Of the three Dupin stories, "The Murders in the Rue Morgue" and "The Purloined Letter" both end with an elegant solution to the mystery, although I found the third, "The Murder of Marie Roget", dull and pedestrian. "The Gold-Bug" is a mystery story of another type, concentrating not on a crime but on a search for buried treasure and reflecting Poe's interest in the science of cryptography.

During his lifetime, Poe was better known as a literary critic than as an author of fiction, and in the years after his death had the curious distinction, for an American writer, of becoming better known in Continental Europe than in the English-speaking world. He was particularly well-known in France, where his work was translated and popularised by Charles Baudelaire. This is perhaps not surprising, as I have often found there is something rather un- American about those works by which he is best remembered today. One might have expected the early literary works of the young Republic to be vigorous, optimistic and democratic in tone, but Poe's Gothic tales and poems are sombre and pessimistic, often aristocratic in their subject-matter and frequently set in Europe. "Metzengerstein", for example, is set in Hungary, "The Masque of the Red Death" in mediaeval Italy, "The Pit and the Pendulum" in Spain under the Inquisition and the Dupin stories in France. Several of his stories deal with a mad or cruel aristocrat or ruler who is overcome by some terrible fate ("Metzengerstein", "The Masque of the Red Death" or "Hop-Frog"), and a recurring theme in others is a ruined or ruinous palace or castle. In "The Fall of the House of Usher" the title has a double meaning; it can be interpreted as referring to the decline or a once-great family or to the collapse of an actual building.

Unlike some earlier Gothic writers, Poe does not always make use of the supernatural in his stories. He can also create a sense of horror by evoking the terrible power of nature ("A Descent into the Maelstrom") or the cruelty of which humans are capable ("The Pit and the Pendulum"). Both those stories end happily, with the narrator saved almost miraculously from his terrifying predicament, although an escape from death is the exception rather than the rule in Poe's horror stories, where death is more often something inexorable. The death of a beloved young woman is a particularly recurrent theme, possibly reflecting the early deaths of his mother and his wife, and occurs in poems such as "Annabel Lee", "The Raven" and "Ulalume"), and stories such as "Ligeia" and "The Fall of the House of Usher". (Both these stories also deal with another of Poe's obsessions, premature burial).

Both as a poet and as an author of short stories, Poe is a very uneven writer. At his best, however, he must rank as one of America's finest with a unique ability to conjure up an atmosphere is psychological horror in his stories and to convey emotion through the musical use of language in his poetry. (Perhaps his greatest achievement in this regard is "The Bells", in which he reproduces in words the sounds of four different types of bell- silver, golden, brazen and iron, corresponding to the emotions of merriment, joy, terror and grief).

On a final note, I was very impressed by the handsome elegance of the hardback volume itself, confirming my view that American books, both hardback and paperback, are often superior in quality to British ones.
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Chilled to the Bone, April 18, 2006
A Kid's Review
This review is from: Complete Stories and Poems of Edgar Allan Poe (Hardcover)
The Complete Stories and Poems of Edgar Allan Poe, is a good book to read on a rainy night. This book takes us back to the time of giant monsters, supernatural monsters, and dead people who come back to life seeking revenge against the people who murdered them. We can hear the monster's heart beat through Edgar Allan Poe's poetic form. The stories keep us in suspense until the bitter end. My favorite in the collection remains "The Fall of the House of Usher," about a family and how they get ripped apart. The family tree grows without branches; Roderick and Madeleine live as direct descendents of the original Usher, which the narrator says constitutes a flaw in the strength of the family. A large crack runs through the house, itself, a symbol of the family breaking apart. Roderick suffers from hyper-sensitivity to light, sound, and touch, keeping himself enclosed in a dark padded room. Madeleine Usher suffers from catatonia, which leaves her often appearing dead. Roderick constantly worries about putting her in the family tomb while she still lives. The old house makes Roderick even more afraid to the point that he shakes uncontrollably. People who like to have their socks scared off will enjoy Poe's tales.
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5.0 out of 5 stars My favorite author all in one place!, July 9, 2012
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This review is from: Complete Stories and Poems of Edgar Allan Poe (Hardcover)
Edgar Allen Poe is in my opinion one of the greatest authors of all time. Almost all of his works all in one place who could ask for more. My favorite is "A tale tale heart". But you have to buy the book to read it yourself I'm not going to spoil it for you.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Easily navigable table of contents, September 26, 2014
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Just what it says. Easily navigable table of contents, even if strangely organised--in alphabetical order, rather than sorted by genre (usually you see 'Tales of Mystery and Horror' separated from 'Satire', etc. Can't beat the whole collection for free.
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Nobody Does Horror Better Than Edgar Allen Poe, November 12, 2003
By 
Scott Kolecki (Brooklyn, Ohio USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Complete Stories and Poems of Edgar Allan Poe (Hardcover)
Whether you were forced to read him as a high school student, numbly opening to one of his many short stories or poems, or as an avid fan of the macabre, you delved into his darkest works, it doesn't take long to understand why Edgar Allen Poe is considered to be one of the great writers of all time, blending styles ranging from horror to comedy into his volume of work to create stories that capture the imagination and thrill the soul.
Many of his writings have been translated into film, or referenced in other literary works, television programs, even some of the great satires of the stage and screen. Here now, is a chance to share in the complete works of this masterful writer of the macabre.
From "The Raven" to "The Tell-Tale Heart", this collection of his stories and poems is beautifully laid out in a hard-cover edition that is far less expensive than comparible collections of his works in paperback. For anyone from the casual reader to the most dedicated fan of American literature, this collection is a must have for any home library.
Scott Kolecki
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5.0 out of 5 stars Awesome!, February 22, 2013
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This review is from: Complete Stories and Poems of Edgar Allan Poe (Hardcover)
I bought this book for my fiance because he's hugely into writing, literature and poetry as well as Edgar All Poe. Not only did it arrive a day early (Literally in 2 days!) but he loves it. He started reading through it as soon as he opened it. :)
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very thorough., July 22, 2006
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This review is from: Complete Stories and Poems of Edgar Allan Poe (Hardcover)
First of all, this review will provide insight of the book's content and condition (I bought it used). Poe and his writing speak for themselves.

As far as the content of this book, the title speaks for itself also. The stories are separated into three different sections titled "Tales of Mystery and Horror" (containing some of his more famous works such as "The Tell-Tale Heart," "The Cask of Amontillado," and "The Masque of the Red Death"), "Humor and Satire" (which include "The Man that Was Used Up" and "The Sphinx"), and "Flights and Fantasies" ("Eleonora" and "The Oval Portrait" are contained here). The first of the last two sections of the book contains his novel "The Narrative of A. Gordon Pym of Nantucket" and the last is the complete collection of ALL his poems.

I purchased this book used from warehouse_deals and was glad of the product I received. Although there were wears and tears on the dust cover (which isn't important to me), the book binding retained its shape regardless of the age of the book. In fact, it only looks a couple of months old on the outside. The pages are yellowing, the dead giveaway that this is a used book (other than the dust cover).

Overall, this is one of those books that every library should be without. The publisher did a great job of collecting and binding this compilation; it's complete and should last a lifetime.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A little worn, but a definitive collection of POEtry and stories, February 7, 2014
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This review is from: Complete Stories and Poems of Edgar Allan Poe (Hardcover)
The collection would have gotten 5 stars, except that book jacket was a little worn and though I purchased brand new, didn't appear so on the outside. Other than that, great shape and a nice collection of Poe's work.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Chilled to the Bone, April 18, 2006
A Kid's Review
This review is from: Complete Stories and Poems of Edgar Allan Poe (Hardcover)
The Complete Stories and Poems of Edgar Allan Poe, is a good book to read on a rainy night. This book takes us back to the time of giant monsters, supernatural monsters, and dead people who come back to life seeking revenge against the people who murdered them. We can hear the monster's heart beat through Edgar Allan Poe's poetic form. The stories keep us in suspense until the bitter end. My favorite in the collection remains "The Fall of the House of Usher," about a family and how they get ripped apart. The family tree grows without branches; Roderick and Madeleine live as direct descendents of the original Usher, which the narrator says constitutes a flaw in the strength of the family. A large crack runs through the house, itself, a symbol of the family breaking apart. Roderick suffers from hyper-sensitivity to light, sound, and touch, keeping himself enclosed in a dark padded room. Madeleine Usher suffers from catatonia, which leaves her often appearing dead. Roderick constantly worries about putting her in the family tomb while she still lives. The old house makes Roderick even more afraid to the point that he shakes uncontrollably. People who like to have their socks scared off will enjoy Poe's tales.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Nephew Loved it, December 26, 2012
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This review is from: Complete Stories and Poems of Edgar Allan Poe (Hardcover)
My 13 year old nephew (at the time) didn't enjoy reading until I got him this book. He found them interesting and was able to sit and have a conversation about what he read, turned him on to other books too.
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Complete Stories and Poems of Edgar Allan Poe
Complete Stories and Poems of Edgar Allan Poe by Edgar Allan Poe (Hardcover - November 18, 1966)
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