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Computer Algorithms: Introduction to Design and Analysis (Addison-Wesley Series in Computer Science) Hardcover – February, 1988

ISBN-13: 978-0201060355 ISBN-10: 0201060353 Edition: 2nd

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Product Details

  • Series: Addison-Wesley Series in Computer Science
  • Hardcover: 600 pages
  • Publisher: Addison-Wesley; 2nd edition (February 1988)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0201060353
  • ISBN-13: 978-0201060355
  • Product Dimensions: 6.5 x 0.9 x 9.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.5 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 2.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (28 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #802,867 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Back Cover

Drawing upon combined decades of teaching experience, Professors Sara Baase and Allen Van Gelder have extensively revised this best seller on algorithm design and analysis to make it the most current and accessible book available. This edition features an increased emphasis on algorithm design techniques such as divide-and-conquer and greedy algorithms, along with the addition of new topics and exercises. It continues the tradition of solid mathematical analysis and clear writing style that made it so popular in previous editions.

Highlights
  • Emphasizes the development of algorithms through a step-by-step process rather than merely presenting the end result
  • Stresses the importance of the algorithm analysis process—continuously re-evaluating, modifying, and perhaps rejecting algorithms until a satisfactory solution is attained
  • Provides extensive treatment of recursion with a clear, student-friendly review of how it works and why it is a valuable programming technique
  • Uses a Java-like pseudocode; includes an appendix with Java examples


0201612445B04062001

--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

About the Author

Sara Baase is a Professor of Computer Science at San Diego State University, and has been teaching CS for 25 years. Dr. Baase is a three-time recipient of the San Diego State University Alumni Association's Outstanding Faculty Award, and she has written a number of textbooks in the areas of algorithms, assembly language and social and ethical issues related to computing. She earned her doctorate at the University of California, Berkeley. 0201060353AB04062001

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Customer Reviews

If your professor requires this book.
"mwinebrenner2"
Only a person who has already know all the stuff can figure out what are the authors talking about in some part of the book.
B. Etin
Unfortunately I had to buy it for a class; so unless you find yourself in a similar position, don't buy this book.
Mike

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 13, 2003
Format: Paperback
I'm a 4th year undergraduate student in computer science and I just finished the Design and Analysis of Computer Algorithms course that was based on this book.
I thought the book was horrible. It did little to help me understand anything but general ideas. Reading this book is like reading a volume of mathematical proofs. The authors speak in symbols.
What makes it much worse is that every page makes multiple references to other portions of the text that aren't on the facing pages. They might be one page turn away, but very often they are a few pages, or even chapters away!
The only reason I would keep this book is for the list of topics it covers.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By G. C. Rhoads on May 5, 2005
Format: Paperback
The second edition was arguably the best undergraduate text on algorithms. But unfortunately the 3rd (current) edition is a major disappointment. On the positive side, the coverage of graph algorithms was expanded; on the negative side, is everything else! The explanations are consistently worse than in the second edition. The description and explanation of Quicksort is particularly bad, in fact it's so horrible it should be ripped out of the book and thrown away. About the only use the book now has is as a source of exercises for professors to assign to their students -- fortunately, the exercises are almost entirely the same as in the second edition and are still the best set in any algorithms text.

I have only one thing to say to the author; if it ain't broke, don't fix it!
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21 of 25 people found the following review helpful By B. Etin on May 11, 2001
Format: Paperback
This is one of two books I must say sorry to. I hope readers may find my words helpful. I must say this is a poor book, although I feel the authors did put efforts to make it nice.
There are a lot of classical and excellent books on this subject. But here's the reason my department chose it as our textbook: Because the other books are relatively hard and deep for the students.
But here is the response from the studnets at the end of the semester, no matter it is an A student or C student: They hate this book, since they can not get much information after spending hours and hours on it. And they eventually found those "harder" books in lib, and loved them. The key reason is, those books explained everything clearly. (In almost the same number of pages.)
The key problem as I see is, the authors just understood the materials in a certain way, but not thoroughly, and not able to explain it in a clear way. Only a person who has already know all the stuff can figure out what are the authors talking about in some part of the book.
Now I believe, in order to write a good textbook for students, at least you should be a master in this area.
If some of my words hurts, I am sorry. But I am talking about my feeling and most students' feeling.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By "kungjoel" on February 25, 2001
Format: Paperback
This book really didn't give much at all. Much because of its useless explainations, that are probably really juicy if you already know it and pretty worthless if you don't... I didn't. Just one thing to do, attend all classes if you got this book for class litterature, and if you live in Canada or as I do in Sweden, use it as fire wood-substitute when it's cold...
(Hmm does layout spell "n-o-t-e-p-a-d"?)
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By B. Etin on May 11, 2001
Format: Paperback
This is one of two books I must say sorry to. I hope readers may find my words helpful. I must say this is a poor book, although I feel the authors did put efforts to make it nice.
There are a lot of classical and excellent books on this subject. But here's the reason my department chose it as our textbook: Because the other books are relatively hard and deep for the students.
But here is the response from the studnets at the end of the semester, no matter it is an A student or C student: They hate this book, since they can not get much information after spending hours and hours on it. And they eventually found those "harder" books in lib, and loved them. The key reason is, those books explained everything clearly. (In almost the same number of pages.)
The key problem as I see is, the authors just understood the materials in a certain way, but not thoroughly, and not able to explain it in a clear way. Only a person who has already know all the stuff can figure out what are the authors talking about in some part of the book.
Now I believe, in order to write a good textbook for students, at least you should be a master in this area.
If some of my words hurts, I am sorry. But I am talking about my feeling and most students' feeling.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Purist on July 2, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
i took a computer algorithms class with the author of this book and i have to say it was possibly the worst class i have ever taken. The course was based heavily on the textbook (after all the professor was the author) and i found it extremely difficult to understand most of what was written in this book. The chapters are comprised of general, vague ideas that did not help in understanding the material unless i was probably a graduate student. Overall this book was useless in learning algorithms and spent most of my time looking them up from other books.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Jim Bogan on November 30, 2000
Format: Paperback
I am a CS major and I was required to get this book for my Algorithms class, I wasn't too dissapointed with it but I didn't see much in it either. The major flaw is this book would have to be the code, I know it is a algorithms book and code shouldn't matter. I like the idea of psuedo java code. But the fact that the code is much more complicated than it has to be can make it tough for some people to follow it. Also throughout the book there are a lot of "refer to blah", and blah is a couple chapters back. So you spend a minute looking for blah and when you finally find it you forget why you are looking at it.
The book does have a good but quick intro to the math needed throughout the rest of the book, but it might be a little too quick for some. For almost every algorithm there is a thorough explanation, proof, and whatever else is needed.
All in all this isn't a bad book but you could probably find better.
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