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Comrades - Almost a Love Story

18 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Actors: Maggie Cheung, Leon Lai, Eric Tsang, Kristy Yang, Christopher Doyle
  • Directors: Peter Chan
  • Writers: Ivy Ho
  • Producers: Peter Chan
  • Format: Color, Subtitled, Widescreen, NTSC
  • Language: Cantonese
  • Subtitles: Chinese, English
  • Region: All Regions
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: Unrated
  • Studio: Tai Seng
  • DVD Release Date: June 19, 2001
  • Run Time: 116 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00005B6LG
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #261,012 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Comrades - Almost a Love Story" on IMDb

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 24 people found the following review helpful By jluo@mindspring.com on June 17, 2001
Format: DVD
Simply put, this film is one of the greatest films about love and fate. Sensitive, complicated and truthful. It has stirred the deepest layer of my soul.
What makes love interesting is that love in real life is invariably tangled up with everything else, ambitions, earthly pursuits, spituality, friendship etc. The two main characters came to Hong Kong for a better future, for themselves and their loved ones. There are lots of obstacles on the way. Like most immigrants, they have no support system, nothing to fall back on. What they face is prejudice. Everything they achieve is through their own determination and hard work. It is under such circumstances that Li Qiao and Li Xiao Jun(btw, their last names, Li, though sounds the same in English, are different in Chinese) are thrown together by fate and falls in love. But they are each presented with his/her own dilemma: Li Xiao Jun has a girlfriend at home. Li Qiao spares no effort at passing herself off as a native Hong Kongese (or Hong Konger? whatever), to be rid of her past in the mainland as much as possible. Having a boyfriend from the mainland would seriously undermine her scheme. In the beginning, she was even ashamed to speak Mandarin, although she was fluent in it. She constantly reminds herself what she is here for, she wants to be rich. She is shamelessly superficial. Or is she? That's the real success of the film. Despite her efforts, she cannot keep her loving, caring nature hidden. Through many trials and tribulations, they demonstrate one thing that is deeply ingrained in the Chinese view of life: what belongs to you in fate will be yours eventually.
Maggie Cheung Man-Yu's performence as Li Qiao is nothing short of greatness.
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20 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Linda Linguvic HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on December 25, 2001
Format: DVD
This film won all kinds of awards, including Hong Kong's Movie of the Year 1997 and chosen as one of Time magazine's 1997 ten best films. It's in Mandarin Chinese, with Cantonese and English subtitles and is a very moving romantic comedy about two young people from China who try their very best not to fall in love with each other. Maggie Cheung and Leon Lai are so attractive and personable that its hard to take your eyes off them, and the directing by Peter Chan displays his skill at making subtle emotions clear while still keeping them subtle.
The story is set mostly in Hong Kong and then moves to New York and covers a period of ten years. Leon Lai is an immigrant from China who is impressed with Hong Kong. He's thrilled to have a flush toilet in his room and thinks that the best job in the world would be working in McDonalds. Maggie Cheung does her best to not act like a "mainlander" even though she, too, has recently come from the mainland. There are some very funny scenes about English lessons and a full cast of characters set against the Hong Kong background. The story follows these two over the next ten years, including the change in the Hong Kong economy after the stock market crash in 1987. There are ups and downs in their relationship. They part, take different partners, meet again, and then again are separated. The audience sees the gradual maturing of these characters and their internal struggles to stay away from each other and to also try hard to reject their mainland background. But through it all, the audience understands that they are both deeply Chinese. And also in love.
I felt the presence of Asia as I watched this film. I'd like to see Hong Kong, and mainland China some day. I don't know if I ever will. But a film like this brings me a little closer. Recommended.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Matthew M. Yau on February 27, 2002
Format: DVD
Comrades, Almost a Love Story has a very different Chinese title - Sweet as Honey. Sweet as Honey is actually a all-time favorite single performed by the now-deceased popstar Teresa Teng back in the 70's. A Chinese saying "you must know Teresa Teng if you're from mainland". The two main characters in the film, Li Xiao Jun (Leon Lai) and Li Ciao (Maggie Cheung) were immigrants from mainland China who arrived in Hong Kong in 1986. The "love story" was about these two young hearts trying to their best effort not falling in love with each other. Li Xiao Jun was an innocent man from Tianjian (northern China) who took shelter at his aunt Rose's subleased apartment. Jun was excited about having his own toilet and was amazed at the night lives led by Hong Kong locals. Should he know that almost half of his housemates practiced prostitution, he would have judged differently. Jun wrestled with blending in the Hong Kong lifestyle - which was well depicted and authentic. He had trouble speaking and understanding Cantonese, the dialect most common-spoken at the former British colony. His made himself a fool at McDonald's and met Li Ciao, who happened to immigrated to Hong Kong from Guangzhou.
Li Ciao lived out a typical southern mainlander back in the 80's: strong-willed, ambitious, and money oriented. She tried to dress like, act like, talk like, and interact like a Hong Kong local. In fact, she denied herself as being the "same" as Li Xiao Jun, who came from the mainland. Li Ciao knew she purpose of coming to Hong Kong was not to meet someone like Li Xiao Jun, who also happened to come from mainland and spoke no English and would not make every opportunity in climbing the ceiling in the fast-paced, rampaging city.
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trying to find a movie I saw years ago but do not know the title
The scene you describe is from the middle section of Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon, which lost the 2000 Oscar for best picture to the inferior (in my opinion) The Gladiator.
Jan 22, 2010 by Invader |  See all 4 posts
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