and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$3.83
Qty:1
  • List Price: $5.00
  • Save: $1.17 (23%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Con Art - Why you should sell your Damien Hirsts while you can Paperback – March 24, 2012


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$3.83
$3.83 $22.96


Frequently Bought Together

Con Art - Why you should sell your Damien Hirsts while you can + The $12 Million Stuffed Shark: The Curious Economics of Contemporary Art + Seven Days in the Art World
Price for all three: $27.92

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Paperback: 44 pages
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (March 24, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1475088434
  • ISBN-13: 978-1475088434
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 0.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,396,096 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Julian Spalding was director of art galleries for the cities of Sheffield, Manchester and Glasgow. He established the award winning Ruskin Gallery, the Gallery of Modern Art (Glasgow), the St Mungo Museum of Religious Art and Life, the Open Museum and the Campaign for Drawing. His books include: The Poetic Museum - reviving historic collections: The Eclipse of Art - tackling the crisis in art today; The Art of Wonder, a history of seeing (which won the Bannister Fletcher Prize as the best art book of 2006) and The Best Art You've Never Seen - 101 hidden treasures from around the world (a Rough Guide). His satirical novel about the contemporary art scene, called Nothing On, is also available on Amazon Kindle.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Mr John E Utans on February 2, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I bought this book wanting to gain an insight to current arts practice. I'm unclear as to how any one can take this writing by Julian Spalding seriously. It is fair enough to have an opinion, but opinions need to be backed up, supported & thought through. Throughout the book Spalding makes references to artists & their work, but doesn't include any detail or any context to the work. The writing appears more like a name dropping dinner party guest who actually has never met or been in the same room as the person. Putting David Hockney on par with Michelangelo is a reflection of the depth (or indeed, the lack) of analysis and critical thinking this book revels in.

To anyone seriously wanting to investigate contemporary art, its artists, art & the world surrounding it, this book offers nothing other than the what appears to be a very personal attack.

Alas, it was released on April 1st, so maybe this conceptual provocation is really a work of art in itself...

another thought:

The artist who is after success lets himself be influenced by the public. Generally such an artist contributes nothing new, for the public acclaims only what it already knows, what it recognizes.

ANDRE GIDE, Pretexts: Reflections on Literature and Morality
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Steve Harrison VINE VOICE on February 9, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is a short but nicely-written presentation of the author's opinions. He is critical of much modern art and of the modern art market. I happen to agree with him. The problem is that his book requires, rather than provides, an understanding of art or the market. For that I recommend Don Thompson's The Twelve Million Dollar Stuffed Shark. Reading that book, though, makes Spalding's superfluous unless you want to read confirmation of Thompson's opinions from an art expert (Thompson is an economist).
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Jeff Conroy on September 5, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Spalding is so overzealous that the message gets mired in his anger and becomes tedious. Toning it down a bit may have made his arguments a bit more palatable.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Dennis on August 6, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Conceptual art is not all rubbish. But much of it is a put on job. Spalding is right on. And describes the system that supports it with brutal honesty. Shit in a can at the Tate? Then again, if a collection needs to reflect the times so be it. The poor conservation expert though . . .
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Mr. Spalding comes off like an evangelical preacher, and is (possibly) even more heavy handed. There are some interesting points in this book, but the are overshadowed by the uncompromising hatred Mr. Spalding has of contemporary art. Personally I disagree with many of the points in his book, and thanks to his tone I easily dismissed his arguments as those of a raving madman. If you are interested in a more objective look at contemporary art, read Don Thompson's The Twelve Million Dollar Stuffed Shark. It is a book that gives you the facts of the art world and lets you make up your own mind. This book is barely worth the paper it is printed on.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Lance on October 12, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
While I'm not sure I agree with every idea in this book,it is thought provoking and much of it rings true. Well worth the modest price, if you are at all interested in art, and especially contemporary art.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Bill on June 4, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
Enjoyable read. Well said. Finished reading 12 million dollar stuffed shark and then i read this and together they were very enlightening. I recommend both books
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Kindle Edition
Spalding comes with a lot of good points. His angryness givea good energy to the essay. I allready sold my con art
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?