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126 of 131 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Way It Is
In the late 1960's and early 70's there was a phrase that was made popular which went, "Tell it the way it is." It came about as a result of the falsehoods which society was being inundated with from all sides of life. People, and especially the young people of that time, were tired of being lied to. In this book, published over four decades ago, Mouni Sadhu...
Published on July 14, 2001 by Ian Andrews

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7 of 12 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Advanced practices
Well, the books not expensive and it reads like, the man that wrote it knows what he is talking about. But the practices he gives you to do are some really advanced practices. I am sure the practices he tells you to do daily. Would produce results, its just that a beginner in concentration exercises would be really hard put, to get anything from the knowledge contained in...
Published on December 30, 2009 by Jeffery Dane Wilkerson


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126 of 131 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Way It Is, July 14, 2001
By 
Ian Andrews (the deserts of Arizona) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Concentration a Guide to Mental Mastery (Paperback)
In the late 1960's and early 70's there was a phrase that was made popular which went, "Tell it the way it is." It came about as a result of the falsehoods which society was being inundated with from all sides of life. People, and especially the young people of that time, were tired of being lied to. In this book, published over four decades ago, Mouni Sadhu "tells it the way it is" in regard to the art and discipline of meditation. He pulls no punches and does not try to sugar coat the cold, hard facts about the development of the ability to concentrate and its necessity in being able to meditate properly.
Mouni Sadhu is the religious name taken by a Westerner who studied with Sri Ramana Maharshi, a famous and much beloved Indian spirtual teacher who passed away at the mid-point of the twentieth century. The word "mouni" means "silent" and "sadhu" refers to a wandering holy man of the Hindu faith. Though the author had tried many paths on the route to self-realization, it wasn't until he came upon his Indian teacher Sri Ramana that he managed to successfully break through the ego's hard exterior and into the infinity of being. He is therefore a bona fide spokesman for the truths which he recollects in this book.
Written in a simple and easily understandable style, Concentration is a classic among books on the art of meditation. Published, as it was, before our fascination with things "New Agey," it dispells many of the myths and misconceptions that have arisen and been promoted out of that movement. And for this reason alone, for the preservation of the truth, it is worth its weight in gold.
First and foremost among the myths it dispells is the idea that developing concentration is really of no consequence in the practical application of the art of meditation, as some so-called New Age gurus would have people believe. This is like saying that for an automobile to function properly it doesn't need gasoline! Without the ability to concentrate, our efforts at meditation will result only in going nowhere, in spinning our wheels in an unending rut.
Concentration is the cornerstone upon which our ability to engage ourselves in true meditation is based. Without its proper development it is as though we are in a car without a steering wheel. We have no way of directing ourselves toward our ultimate goal.
A second myth that is dealt with, which has been promoted in recent years, is that it is not important to be able to develop within oneself the ability to quiet the mind of all extraneous thoughts. This is the subject of Chapter Fourteen wherein is given a method of beginning to develop this ability to quiet the mind. In his usual straightforward way, Mouni Sadhu states quite unequivocally, "The key to success in this study is just the losing of interest in uncontrolled thinking. With that key you may open the golden gate, from which you expect so much. Without the key, there is no purpose in even beginning the exercises."
Mouni Sadhu gives a powerful presentation of all the aspects leading up to the attainment of the ability to concentrate, structuring the book into four sections. The first seven chapters deal with the definition, method, use, and roll of concentration in a spiritual search. The next seven chapters cover the psychological preliminaries and the keys to successful use of the techniques (which themselves are outlined in the third section of seven chapters) for developing concentration. The last chapter, Twenty-Two, deals with what he calls "guided intuitional knowledge, also called the wisdom of the Self, which is the ultimate aim of concentration." Here, whether you are a beginner or an old hand in working with the mind, is a compendium of inspiring information in the practical experience of the higher states of consciousness, useful in helping one to corroborate one's own experience with someone who has been there.
In this slender book, Mouni Sadhu manages to cover a great deal of important ground for the person interested in developing his mental faculties. Though he states at the outset that such abilities are not easily won, he does encourage the reader to follow his own inclinations regarding the level of commitment he is willing to make. He stresses not getting ahead of oneself, but to take it one step at a time. This is all one need do to have success with these exercises.
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45 of 46 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Challenge not to be taken lightly, April 9, 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Concentration a Guide to Mental Mastery (Paperback)
This is a excellent book. It is not a difficult read, although it should be read carefully for understating of the subtle issues being addressed in the book. It is truly as the title says, a guide to mental mastery. But I must warn readers. Reading this book is not a assurance of mental mastery. A reader must be deligent and patient with the exercises in the book, in order to reap the long term benefits. I hope others can will gain by reading this book as well
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27 of 27 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A basic book for Mental development, October 17, 2002
By 
John M Hansen (Philadelphia, PA United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Concentration a Guide to Mental Mastery (Paperback)
Training your mind to concentrate is one of the most difficult, but one of the most rewarding, tasks that you will ever undertake. This book is a guide through this difficult process. There is no royal road to mastering yor mind, but this book at least sets out some good guide posts.
My only quibble with the book is the author's fascination with his Indian Guru, and his acceptance of the Indian Hindu belief structure. This is not a serious enough quibble to harm the utility of the book. I reccomend it to all who wish to make their mind their tool.
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48 of 52 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This is excersize for the serious, only., March 19, 1998
This review is from: Concentration a Guide to Mental Mastery (Paperback)
I note that the listed publication date is 1986. I purchased my copy in 1966. This book DESERVES a long sales life, being the most masterful work of its kind ever done. If you want to achieve pure concentration in its highest form and are willing to expend the necessary effort, buy and use this book!
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25 of 26 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars THE Definitive Guide to Mental Mastery, May 7, 2005
By 
Ryan (Burlingame, US, Canada) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Concentration a Guide to Mental Mastery (Paperback)
When I first encountered this little gem of a book, I read it once through and didn't give it too much thought afterward. I was mainly interested in improving my concentration in an effort to strengthen my intellect, and, at the time, it seemed to me that there were better ways of doing this. This probably isn't the case, though. While Sadhu's exercises are almost insanely difficult, they are practically guaranteed to bring results. And the great thing is that much of the advice offered in the book is compatible with almost any theological or philosophical outlook. The only thing that I found a little off-putting about the book is all the Eastern mysticism and such that Sadhu makes references to and seems to believe in. That's not even nearly enough to detract in any way from this book's value, though.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars My favorite book in the whole world., July 19, 2006
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This review is from: Concentration a Guide to Mental Mastery (Paperback)
Any time you spend reading from this book and doing the exercises, no matter how minimal your discipline, will be time well spent.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars worth the effort, January 26, 2009
This review is from: Concentration a Guide to Mental Mastery (Paperback)
This book isn't on any best seller this and still if you want to learn how to concentrate, this is it. I've had the book for a little over 2 yrs and have only finished half of the exercises. When you think you've performed exercises adequately you haven't, go back and do it again. This book will test your will power but what you gain is worth the work you put in to it
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Introduction to Advanced Yoga Philosophy in Action, August 16, 2005
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This review is from: Concentration a Guide to Mental Mastery (Paperback)
I have been an off and on again student on Yoga in its many forms for four decades. This book gives a practical, step-by-step guide to the application of the principals at the heart of Yoga. The instructions allow the student to cut through the dogma and get to the essence of mastering the mind.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Book, "Concentration - A Guide For Mental Mastery", October 19, 2011
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This is the best book and the best exercises for increasing your ability to concentration and mastering your thinking, that I have ever read. I lived in a Yoga Ashram for 2 years in the 1960's and this was one of the books that were like our text books. I have done the concentration exercises in this book and if the student is diligent and does "exactly" what Mouni Sadhu says to do, they will be able to increase their ability to concentrate to a degree that they would not have imagined possible.
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13 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A concentration primer geared towards spiritual seekers, November 8, 2007
This review is from: Concentration a Guide to Mental Mastery (Paperback)
This is the second book that I've read on concentration(first being Theron Q. Dumont's Power of concentration, that I actually recommend to read before starting with this book). Actually, it might be the third - if I considered the first self help book I've ever read (a long while ago).
This book is written with the spiritual seeker in mind, the person who is aware that focusing the mind is the basic practice for everything that lies forward, but it can actually be studied by anyone since it has nice gradual exercises. I think that the name of the author means "silent yogi" in an Indian language (could actually be Sanskrit).
Concentration book is structured in four parts, touching the purpose and usefulness of studying concentration and other preliminary explanations (part 1), achievements of some masters (saints, yogis/rishis) of both East and West and outlines their training methods (part 2). The third part is about the exercises themselves, and they are graded - each of them assumes you mastered the previous ones (he emphasizes you need to actually master them, not just do them a few times then move to next series). Finally, in the ending chapters the author touches the issue of using the new skills to meditate and deepen understanding of the purpose of life.
There is something interesting about this book.... He says you shouldn't even read the next chapters until you have mastered the exercises in the current chapter. Well, I tried to do that, started the exercises, then, well, dropped. Started again later, dropped again. In short, it took me basically one year to read it fully (no, I didn't master anything, but after a while I decided to read it anyway). Now I do the exercises here daily (well, almost, this is a crazy and busy world).
I would suggest reading first Power of concentration by Theron Q. Dumont. That book has some shortcomings in the exercises part, but is excellent in building the motivation (it focuses on mundane objectives like following through, succeeding in business, overcoming bad habits, etc.). Actually, this book also builds motivation, but on a deeper, spiritual level, hence some people would be better off by following my suggestion.
I personally liked all the spiritual teachings and warnings, and one could ignore them and just stick to the exercises. Power of concentration (Theron Q. Dumont) probably took things too lightly. This book takes them too seriously, but then again, training the mind is something serious. If you think about it, you cannot take your belongings with you after death. Heck, you cannot even take the body, even if you are a world champion bodybuilder. But, you could take the mind with you - or at least this is what Eastern masters tell us. So, mind training is something not to be taken lightly. I do believe however that he exaggerated a bit - people who want to go far probably already know about potential perils, and the rest will probably never need to understand why he said that anyway. Actually, he didn't exaggerate, but my take is that the book would be better by emphasizing it less.
To end this, a book is as good as the changes it determines you to undergo. A book is a book. Results and changes are something else, and they require efforts and dedication. There is no such thing as a short path to mastery - be it medicine, computers, sports, and of course concentration and meditation. This book does determine you to take action - is actually quite good at that - but, as I said, is just a help, a supplement, a guide, a reinforcement... it is definitely not a replacement for the mental work that needs to happen on a daily basis in order to truly succeed.
Good luck!
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Concentration a Guide to Mental Mastery
Concentration a Guide to Mental Mastery by M. Sadhu (Paperback - June 1985)
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