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Concepts of Genetics (9th Edition) Hardcover – February 16, 2008

ISBN-13: 978-0321524041 ISBN-10: 0321524047 Edition: 9th

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 876 pages
  • Publisher: Benjamin Cummings; 9 edition (February 16, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0321524047
  • ISBN-13: 978-0321524041
  • Product Dimensions: 9.8 x 1.4 x 11.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.8 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #120,554 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

William S. Klug is currently Professor of Biology at the College of New Jersey (formerly Trenton State College) in Ewing, New Jersey. He served as chair of the Biology Department for 17 years, a position to which he was first elected in 1974. He received his B.A. degree in Biology from Wabash College in Crawfordsville, Indiana, and his Ph.D. from Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois. Prior to coming to the College of New Jersey, he was on the faculty of Wabash College as an Assistant Professor. His research interests have involved ultrastructural and molecular genetic studies of oogenesis in Drosophila. He has taught the genetics course as well as the senior capstone seminar course in human and molecular genetics to undergraduate biology majors for each of the last 35 years. In 2002, he was the recipient of the initial teaching award given at the College of New Jersey granted to the faculty member who most challenges students to achieve high standards. He also received the 2004 Outstanding Professor Award from the Sigma Pi International, and in the same year, he was nominated as the Educator of the Year, an award given by the Research and Development Council of New Jersey.

 

Michael R. Cummings is currently Research Professor in the Department of Biological, Chemical and Physical Sciences at Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois. For more than 25 years, he was a faculty member in the Department of Biological Sciences and in the Department of Molecular Genetics at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He has also served on the faculties of Northwestern University and Florida State University. He received his B.A. from St. Mary's College in Winona, Minnesota, and his M.S. and Ph.D. from Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois. In addition to Concepts of Genetics and its companion volumes, he has also written textbooks in human genetics and general biology for nonmajors. His research interests center on the molecular organization and physical mapping of the heterochromatic regions of human acrocentric chromosomes. At the undergraduate level, he teaches courses in Mendelian and molecular genetics, human genetics, and general biology, and has received numerous awards for teaching excellence given by university faculty, student organizations and graduating seniors.

 

Charlotte A. Spencer is currently an Associate Professor in the Department of Oncology at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. She has also served as a faculty member in the Department of Biochemistry at the University of Alberta. She received her B.Sc. in Microbiology from the University of British Columbia and he Ph.D. in Genetics from the University of Alberta, followed by postdoctoral training at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Washington. Her research interests involve the regulation of RNA polymerase II transcription in cancer cells, cells infected with DNA viruses and cells transversing the mitotic phase of the cell cycle. She has taught courses in Biochemistry, Genetics, Molecular Biology and Oncology, at both undergraduate and graduate levels. She has contributed Genetics, Technology and Society essays for several editions of Concepts of Genetics as well as Essentials of Genetics. In addition, she has written booklets in the Exploring Biology series, which are aimed at the undergraduate nonmajors level.

 

Michael A. Palladino is Associate Professor in the Department of Biology at Monmouth University in West Long Branch, New Jersey. He received his B.S. degree in Biology from Trenton State College (now known as The College of New Jersey) and his Ph.D. in Anatomy and Cell Biology from the University of Virginia. He directs an active laboratory of undergraduate student researchers studying molecular mechanisms involved in innate immunity of mammalian male reproductive organs and genes involved in oxygen homeostasis and ischemic injury of the testis. He has taught a wide range of courses for both majors and nonmajors and currently teaches genetics, biotechnology, endocrinology, and laboratory in cell and molecular biology. He has received several awards for research and teaching, including the New Investigator Award of the American Society of Andrology, the 2005 Distinguished Teacher Award from Monmouth University, and the 2005 Caring Heart Award from the New Jersey Association for Biomedical Research. He is co-author of the undergraduate textbook Introduction to Biotechnology, Series Editor for the Benjamin Cummings Special Topics in Biology booklet series, and author of the first booklet in the series, Understanding the Human Genome Project. 

 


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Customer Reviews

This book was my shortcut to buying the newest edition, so t saved me money.
Amanda Spuzzillo
The information in this book was correct however it was not in depth enough to even be a good reference for my intro genetics class.
Sean
The topics covered aren't well organized and the content is poorly written and confusing.
VMZ

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Dan5280 on January 28, 2011
Format: Hardcover
This has to be the most poorly written text book I've ever used. My biggest frustration is reading about key concepts (in bold) that are left undefined while continuing to discuss the topic in some abstract way. Some of the glossary terms are poorly defined as well, where 20 seconds with google gives correct, succinct answers. As a Pre-Med student, I've seen my share of biology text books. I've never been so frustrated trying to learn concepts that, quite frankly, aren't that complicated. As a side note, the student handbook is just as poorly written.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Just another college student on November 27, 2009
Format: Hardcover
I had to use this book (9th edition) for my genetics class. It's an interesting an easy read but does not cover the mathematics behind genetics very well. If you are looking for the "big picture," then this text will probably help. However, if you need a text to help you understand the specifics and math behind genetics problems, then search elsewhere. Like some of the other reviewers have mentioned, the web site is totally useless, and this book is going to need a lot of editing before it is up to par with other genetics texts.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Zachary T. Rivers on February 9, 2009
Format: Hardcover
I bought this book new after hearing about the included web page. One of my classes in the previous semester had a similar set-up, and I found it very useful. However, this webpage is a rip-off. The flash cards and the glossary functions don't work, making the website pretty much useless. The book is also riddled with typos and poor formatting. If you need it for a class, buy it used, but if you don't, don't buy it at all.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By quiescent_turbidity on December 9, 2012
Format: Hardcover
I used this book for an introductory genetics class. It's not bad, per se. I even enjoyed some of the extra articles of interest that they put in as an excuse for making new editions. But there are other texts that get the concepts across so much better. In particular, I'd recommend the genetics textbook by Robert J. Booker for its superior illustrations (yes, they matter) and clear writing.
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7 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Sean on December 17, 2008
Format: Hardcover
The information in this book was correct however it was not in depth enough to even be a good reference for my intro genetics class. I was disappointed with several aspects of this book. I noticed several spelling errors and errors in agreement (eg. is where are is appropriate). The stylistics were primary at best. Each section it seemed began with --to paraphrase-- "in this section you will learn about" and ended with "in the next section you will learn about." This style of writing is like that of a grade school student and makes the read boring. The captions referenced in the text were often not on the same or adjacent page making it a pain to try to look at them while reading. Frequent notes of topics covered in other chapters and unimportant historical anecdotes also made this book a clumsy read and an unhelpful reference.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Dan on October 25, 2011
Format: Hardcover
This book was assigned for my genetics class. One of the worst textbooks I've used. I can't put my finger on it exactly, but the manner in which it is written is confusing. I have a very hard time learning anything from this book. Definitions are not clear. It doesn't clearly explain concepts.

My advice is even if your teacher assigns this book for class, skip it, learn the material on your own from somewhere else.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Amanda Spuzzillo on August 6, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book was my shortcut to buying the newest edition, so t saved me money. I liked the book, better in some cases than the new edition, but not some much so some of the updated new research, the new book went more in depth on. But this book worked, I enjoyed reading it very much
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Format: Hardcover
Before reviewing this book, I apologize for any mistake I may commit while writing in english, as I am brazillian. I'm striving to doing so in order to make my review more accessible to everyone. Thank you for your comprehension.

Now on to the review: I purchased this book because it was considerably cheaper than other books about Genetics and while overviewing it before buying, I liked its overall presentation and wide range of topics covered. Huge mistake. The topics covered aren't well organized and the content is poorly written and confusing. While it does cover many topics in genetics, it lacks depht, what leaves the reader wishing for more detailed explanations and strongly dependent to other sources to assimilate the information. It seems that the authors were trying to shrink the information to make this book more succinct but as a result many complex concepts turned out to be uninteligible. As if it was not enough, there are some misleading illustrations that contradicts what is written in its explanation, I'm not kidding. One example is the figure 6-9 in chapter 6.

I gave up studying from this book and began to search other ones and found much better choices. Some of them are:

1 - Robert Brooker's Genetics: Analysis and Principles. An unbelieveable good resource for learning Genetics with very detailed and very well written information plus unmatched quality illustrations. I was really impressed with it. Too bad there's no translation to brazillian portuguese yet, but certainly a keeper.

2- Benjamin Pierce's Genetics: A conceptual approach. That one is what "Concepts Of Genetics" tried to be and failed.
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