Buy Used
$19.78
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Good | Details
Sold by RentU
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Fast shipping from Amazon! Qualifies for Prime Shipping and FREE standard shipping for orders over $35. Overnight, 2 day and International shipping available! Excellent Customer Service.. May not include supplements such as CD, access code or DVD.
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Add to Cart
Trade in your item
Get a $5.69
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Conceptual Mathematics: A First Introduction to Categories Paperback – November 28, 1997

ISBN-13: 978-0521478175 ISBN-10: 0521478170 Edition: 1st

Used
Price: $19.78
12 New from $28.60 30 Used from $15.78
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$142.80
Paperback
"Please retry"
$28.60 $15.78
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"

There is a newer edition of this item:


Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student



NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Paperback: 376 pages
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press; 1st edition (November 28, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0521478170
  • ISBN-13: 978-0521478175
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 6.5 x 9.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #911,843 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Conceptual Mathematics provides an excellent introductory account to categories for those who are starting from scratch. It treats material which will appear simple and familiar to many philosophers, but in an unfamiliar way." Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics

Book Description

The idea of a "category"--a sort of mathematical universe--has brought about a remarkable unification and simplification of mathematics. Written by two of the best known names in categorical logic, this is the first book to apply categories to the most elementary mathematics.

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

This book is simply a gem.
Alexander C. Zorach
This is a great book because it provides a motivation for investigating categories.
Christopher D. Smith
I found it very stimulating and understandable.
J. V. White

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

59 of 60 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 2, 1998
Format: Paperback
Lawvere and Schanuel have created a book at once accessible and stimulating at a great many levels. It discusses the concepts of Category Theory in a simulated "classroom" setting, addressing common questions of students at crucial points in the book. It also wanders in a care-free manner through an amazing number of topics. The book is interesting to non-mathematicians at a philosophical level, and to (beginning) mathematicians as an introduction to an exciting new area of mathematics. The authors have a great attitude, and offer great starting-points for investigation.
I read it as a first year pure math undergraduate, and though it was at times at too low a level (the 'tests,' for instance, are very easy reviews of basic ideas), it never became boring. For me, it read 'like a novel' (and a page-turner, at that). My only gripe is the lack of an annotated "further reading" section, which would have rounded out the book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
27 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Christopher D. Smith on November 30, 2006
Format: Paperback
Many of the reviews evaluate the book from the perspective of graduate students in mathematics want to learn categories, and it's certainly the wrong choice for that purpose. If you think of this as a serious math textbook, then it fails in that goal: significant proofs are the exception rather than the rule; very few, and trivial, exercises; very lacking in depth.

This is a great book because it provides a motivation for investigating categories. It helped me when I was in the position of hearing from a lot of places that subjects I was interested in often used category theory. I tried to read a few "real" books about category theory, and didn't get very far because they did not make the connections I was looking for. I accumulated three or four such books, all with bookmarks at about page 50 to 75. This book taught me relatively little about the theory of categories or the body of knowledge about them, but it provided a wealth of connections between categories and other topics, which made me better able to finish a couple of the real books and figure out what I needed to know there.

My advice, if you're in anything like that situation, is to read this book. Just don't take it too seriously, and don't try to milk more out of it than is really there. Then go learn more about category theory from elsewhere.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
29 of 30 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 6, 2000
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Highly intuitive introduction to this abstract, but highly practical area of mathematics with one glaring fault. First the good news. I have never seen a more carefully explained introduction into an area of mathematics. Many examples and explanations of the principles behind and applications of concept analysis. However, the glaring fault is organization. Details are given without adequate tie in to how they relate to others. The text bounces from one area to the next so it is easy to lose sight of the whole picture. On balance its strengths far outweigh its weaknesses so I recommend it without reservation.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
34 of 38 people found the following review helpful By Elias F Ponvert on November 8, 2001
Format: Paperback
As a first introduction to Categories, this book is well written, clever, simple and very clear. However, I was disappointed with it. From the notoriety of the authors and the, yes, cool illustrations I assumed it would be a gem. However, it fell short. I've been toying with Category Theory for a few years, and every time I try to get into a book on Categories I get stumped at the notions of Functors and Natural Transformations. This book, however, dealt with neither at length, despite the fact that Category Theory originated around the notion of Natural Transformations in the first place. (As I understand it at least.) That said, there are many very cool passages in the book, including a functional analysis of a Chinese restaurant and an elegent exposition of Brouwer's Fixed Point Theorem.
Still, for my purposes, I prefer Robert Goldblatt's "Topoi: The Categorical Analysis of Logig" and Michael Barr's "Category Theory for Computing Science". As both are intended for non Category Theorists, both build their presentations of Category Theory from sratch. Sadly, I think both are out of print. Not for the faint of heart, I'm told Saunders Mac Lane's "Categories for the Working Mathematician" is the classic. (It's on my wish list.)
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
36 of 41 people found the following review helpful By T. Gwinn on November 10, 2002
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
As a topic in itself, category theory should need not to wait until grad-level to be described just because that may be when category theory's power can really begin to be exploited, but unfortunately, most of the category theory books I have looked at presume that level of mathematics.
Similar to what other reviewers noted, I would also say that this book demonstrates the potential of creating a good high-school/undergrad level intro to category theory. But unfortunately, that potential is not quite realized here.
There are hokey intermittent "conversations with students", as a tool to describe ideas, that are more distraction than aid. Some of the examples given are rather condescending in their simplicity. Yet, at other times the authors seem to breeze through more difficult topics with little or no examples. And the organization seems erratic - there is no clear sense of a gameplan as to where they are leading the reader or how all the concepts fit together.
Functors are surprisingly almost glossed over, as if they were relatively unimportant. There are exercises throughout the book, but with no answers provided, they are not really very helpful.
Having said all that, with some focused effort on the reader's part, the ideas do come forth, and admittedly, the authors do cover a fairly broad spectrum of aspects of category theory. This is certainly a non-trivial topic to try and teach, and an introductory book cannot be faulted for not carrying every notion to the nth-degree of either breadth or depth.
Category Theory is one of those topics that (to me) appears 'ho-hum' until you see it actually applied to various topics. The authors have necessarily had to perform a balancing act between describing concepts while not getting caught up in excessively complex examples.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?