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51 of 55 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Template for All Benefit Concerts That Followed
"I'd just like to say before we start off with the concert...that...uhh...to thank you for coming here...as you all know it's a special benefit concert...we've got a good show lined up...I hope so anyway...." And with that introduction from George Harrison, the former Beatle began his August 1, 1971, Concert for Bangla Desh which became the template for all of the benefit...
Published on October 29, 2005 by Steve Vrana

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96 of 102 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The original mix of this album is better
When I purchase a re-master of a classic album, I am always alert to the fact that there might be possible tampering with the original mix: instruments or noises either added or subtracted. Upon listening to the new version of THE CONCERT FOR BANGLADESH, it is very clear that there was a lot of subtraction going on. Although some new clarity is brought into the overall...
Published on October 25, 2005 by Barry Smith


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96 of 102 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The original mix of this album is better, October 25, 2005
By 
Barry Smith (Plainview, New York United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Concert for Bangladesh (Audio CD)
When I purchase a re-master of a classic album, I am always alert to the fact that there might be possible tampering with the original mix: instruments or noises either added or subtracted. Upon listening to the new version of THE CONCERT FOR BANGLADESH, it is very clear that there was a lot of subtraction going on. Although some new clarity is brought into the overall sound of the recording (which originally sounded a bit muddy to some people's ears), there has been an extensive change in many of the sounds I was familiar with on the original LP. For example, several of the stage comments have been deleted, Harrison's introduction of Leon Russell is one. Also, the inspiring hoots and shouts of the background singers during "That's The Way God Planned It" have been erased. Even many of the hilarious audience comments that were audible (someone shouting "Do something Ringo!!" prior to "Awaiting on You All") are now missing. Overall, the new crowd sounds seems to be a lot different from the sounds that were on the original LP. I don't know why the producers of the re-master decided to do this. They should have gone for a more faithful approach. Because of this, the original CD version is still better.

Additionally, the new cover art is not faithful to the original album package. Some of the photos are still there, but I wish that the entire original book would be available for this edition. Not to mention the chronic problem of CD storage: in this package, the bare disc is stuffed in a non-protective sleeve, ready for a barrage of scuffs and scratches.

Despite the drawbacks, the new version of THE CONCERT FOR BANGLADESH not without merits. As mentioned above, there is a new sound clarity which still sounds very good. And then there's the extra Dylan track from the afternoon show "Love Minus Zero/No Limit." Perhaps a few other alternate tracks from the afternoon show could have been added as well as there is plenty of room on the discs for more music.
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51 of 55 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Template for All Benefit Concerts That Followed, October 29, 2005
This review is from: Concert for Bangladesh (Audio CD)
"I'd just like to say before we start off with the concert...that...uhh...to thank you for coming here...as you all know it's a special benefit concert...we've got a good show lined up...I hope so anyway...." And with that introduction from George Harrison, the former Beatle began his August 1, 1971, Concert for Bangla Desh which became the template for all of the benefit concerts that would follow.

However, not only did it raise much needed money, it produced a solid collection of songs from a stellar group of musicians. In addition to former bandmate Ringo Starr and friends Ravi Shankar, Eric Clapton and Bob Dylan; the concert also included (among others) Billy Preston (who worked with the Beatles during the LET IT BE sessions), Leon Russell, Klaus Voorman , Jim Keltner, Carl Radle and Pete Ham (of Badfinger).

The concert opens with a 16-minute performance by Ravi Shankar, backed by three additional Indian musicians on sarod, tabla and tamboura.

Harrison's contributions included four songs from his then current album ALL THINGS MUST PASS along with "While My Guitar Gently Weeps" with Harrison and Clapton trading lead guitar lines. Perhaps the standout song is his acoustic duet with Pete Ham on "Here Comes the Sun." Other Harrison songs are "Something" and the concert-closing number "Bangla Desh." [A studio version of the single was also released in August, but it would stall at No. 23.]

Ringo turns in a solid performance of his hit "It Don't Come Easy." Billy Preston does a rousing version of the gospel-tinged "That's the Way God Planned It." And Leon Russell turns up the energy with the medley "Jumpin' Jack Flash/Youngblood."

The highlight of the concert was arguably the five-song set by Bob Dylan (now including a sixth song, "Love Minus Zero/No Limit"). He is backed by Leon Russell on bass, Harrison on guitar and Ringo on tambourine.

All told, this was an exciting musical event thirty-four years ago, and with this newly remastered edition it sounds even better today. VERY HIGHLY RECOMMENDED
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37 of 39 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "No One is Gettting payed For Anything", October 27, 2005
By 
Anthony Accordino (Massapequa Park, New York United States) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Concert for Bangladesh (Audio CD)
One can argue that the "Concert For Bangladesh", is one of the single most important events in rock n roll history. George Harrison, along with Ravi Shankar invented the pop star benefit concert, Without realizing at the time, that they would influence a whole charitable movement that has continued for decades, for various causes. This reissue CD of that historic concert, proves to be a time capsule that brings one back to an era when for one day, some of classic rocks most gifted musicians put on a show for the ages. The remastered sound quality is out of this world. The first thing I noticed was being able to clearly hear acoustic guitars and some keyboards clearer then ever. The vocal clarity is like night and day compared to the original release. One really notices a major difference during Leon Russell's performance of "Jumpin Jack Flash", and "Youngblood". Of course, Bob Dylan never sounded better during a live acoustic set. It is quite obvious that a lot of care and thought went into the packaging. Although the cd sports a new cover that is different from the original, I felt the packaging still held the historical presentation of the original. Each cd is housed in a slip cover, that has the original cover photo, as well as the same orange color of the 3 LP boxed set. The booklet has both original and new liner notes, and the booklet has a healthy serving of photo's, some not seen before. The only real negative that I found with this set, is the deletion of some of George Harrison's verbal interaction with the audience. Gone is the introduction of Leon Russell before his set, as well as George announcing that he is going to try one with just the acoustic guitars before he played "Here Comes The Sun". Also, removed was the long thunderous ovation he received after playing "Something". When George returned to the stage for his finale "Bangladesh", he told the crowd "Thank-you you're so kind". That was also deleted. I feel that when producers alter the original, they are messing with art. Those verbal interactions with the crowd, were part of the historic final product that we all remember so well and are now a thing of the past. All put aside, the cd is fantastic, with crystal clear remastering, but I sure wish they would have left the entire concert intact and away from the cutting room. Anything missing, can be heard on the full length DVD movie, or the original CD.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars superb sounding remaster, February 25, 2006
By 
G. Wallace (Hilliard, OH USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Concert for Bangladesh (Audio CD)
I was knocked out by the sound of this old recording, just a beautiful restoration. The quieter songs sound much better (particularly the Dylan set). The tune ups between songs have been tightened up a bit so the music just flows along, and most of it is quite good. The Billy Preston number is still a favorite as is the specially written Harrison song "Bangla Desh" where Klaus Voorman tears it up on that electric bass. Dylan's set is compelling throughout, and the extra track ("Love Minus Zero") is another treat. Also thought Harrison's "Wah Wah" and "My Sweet Lord" sounded better than before. The history is long over, but this is yet another of the many terrific live records from the early seventies.
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45 of 55 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Harrison & Friends Lend A Hand, October 25, 2005
This review is from: Concert for Bangladesh (Audio CD)
The Concert for Bangladesh was the first rock charity concert and the forerunner for shows like No Nukes, The Concert for Kampuchea, Live Aid and more recently, Live 8. Spearheaded by George Harrison who was spurred into action by Ravi Shankar's appeal to help the homeless Bengali refugees of the 1971 India-Pakistan war, he gathered a group of friends including Eric Clapton, Ringo Starr, Leon Russell, Billy Preston, Badfinger and Bob Dylan for a concert to raise money for UNICEF at Madison Square Garden. The most notable friend was Mr. Dylan who was at the height of reclusiveness and rarely made public appearances. His set perfectly captured the essence of the show featuring old protest warhorses "A Hard Rain's A-Gonna Fall", "It Takes A Lot To Laugh, It Takes A Train To Cry" and "Blowin' In The Wind", the pretty "Just Like A Woman" and a tip of the cap to Mr. Harrison with "Mr. Tambourine Man". Mr. Clapton guests with Mr. Harrison on a driving guitar duet "While My Guitar Gently Weeps". Mr. Starr sings "It Don't Come Easy" totally off-key, but his lack of pretense and sense of humor shines through to make it a fun performance. Mr. Russell & Mr. Preston were either unknown to many or known as backing musicians at the time, but there electrify performances of "Jumping Jack Flash/Youngblood" & "That's The Way God Planned It" respectively helped catapult them to mainstream success. Mr. Shankar's opening "Bangla Dhun" is a fine piece of sitar music, but at over seventeen minutes long, it makes it tough for repeat listenings. This is Mr. Harrison's show and his songs are the spiritual backbone of the concert. Featuring tracks from the Beatles like a tender performance of "Here Comes The Sun" (backed beautifully by Badfinger living up to their Beatles comparisons) to tracks from his then new album All Things Must Pass. "Wah Wah" is the opening rock song of the show and he slides nicely into solid versions of "My Sweet Lord" and "Awaiting All On You". "Beware Of Darkness" is a duet with Mr. Russell that might well be the best track on the album. Mr. Harrison closes his set with a superb version of "Something" which leads into the group performance of a new song "Bangla Desh" which closes the concert on a high note. The new version of album features a bonus track, "Love Minus Zero/No Limit" by Bob Dylan. The album was a big hit peaking at number two and won the 1972 Album of the Year Grammy Award.
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24 of 28 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars "We've got a lot of singers here ..." where?, October 25, 2005
By 
J. A. DeSilva (San Jose, CA USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Concert for Bangladesh (Audio CD)
As a previous reviewer already stated, the remaster job on this landmark concert album has one major flaw - the background singers are in many cases completely erased from the CD. "That's The Way God Planned It" is a gospel song that has its gospel essence severely restricted by the excising of the background vocalists. It's really a shame as they did a fantastic job on the remastering of the instruments and lead vocals - you can hear the many guitarists distinctly for the first time. If not for the background vocalists having gone missing, I'd give this at least 4 1/2 stars.

I have to agree - I'm keeping my original "Concert for Bangladesh" CD (I still have the original LP as well) because it's a more realistic depiction of those great concerts.

At least you can hear Badfinger on acoustic guitars for the first time with the new CD ...
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the Greatest Concerts of All Time, February 26, 2006
By 
Roger D. Hyman (Knoxville, TN USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Concert for Bangladesh (Audio CD)
I first bought the 3-record LP Set in 1971, when it was first released (I was 14). I wore it out (I still have it), and bought the first release of the CD a few years ago. This new remastered version is highly superior.

The concert features several all-stars, of course, and possibly the best live Dylan set ever recorded.

The DVD is terrific, too. Highly recommended.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Concert For Bangla-Desh, November 1, 2005
This review is from: Concert for Bangladesh (Audio CD)
I agree with most of the reviews so far. I'd like to add a few comments.

I was also kind of peeved at the removal of the background vocals at first, but after several listens I actually like it better that way.

I don't always agree with remixing classics (The John Lennon catalog is a good example of what NOT to do).

In my opinion, the background vocals made the recording sound dated. Don't forget that George himself remixed All Things Must Pass and removed a lot of the "out of date Phil Spector sound".

What I really miss are George's comments and the between song "incidental noises" (like the drum roll before Something).

All in all it's great to have this CD out and remixed. The overall sound is definitely superior to the old version. You can actually hear each individual instrument including Badfinger's acoustic guitars and tambourine.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars THE FIRST AND STILL BEST BENEFIT, October 26, 2005
By 
Robert M. Zilli (High in the Rocky Mountains) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Concert for Bangladesh (Audio CD)
Aside from the gripes of a demanding and never satified few, most folks agree this is an excellent album and, for my money, an excellent repackage of this classic. The box, containing the mini album sleeves and booklet, is a class package that will sit well with the ATMP and Brainwashed boxes on any collector's shelf.

The remastering is supurb and brings out the long lost acoustic guitars and details missing on the cloudy original mix. The Dylan stuff provides a bonus track and crisp, clear acostic guitar throughout. Harrison shines and Ravi Shankar's much neglected performance is top rate .

This is still the best, and now even better, of the charity albums
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Boss Hog in da Hiz-ouse, November 3, 2005
This review is from: Concert for Bangladesh (Audio CD)
I think they did a real good job with making this album sound better than it ever has. I had the vinyl and also the original CD, and its pretty staggering how good this sounds by comparison.

If you like George Harrison, or just even the Beatles, or even just early '70s rock music, you need to pick this up. Leon Russell blows the roof off with his medley of "Jumping Jack Flash" and "Youngblood". But thats just one of many highlights like the perfect rendition of "Here comes the sun" by just George and the great Pete Ham (of Badfinger).
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Concert for Bangladesh
Concert for Bangladesh by George Harrison (Audio CD - 2005)
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