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A Concise Introduction to Logic Textbook Binding – August 11, 1999

ISBN-13: 978-0534520069 ISBN-10: 0534520065 Edition: 7th

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Product Details

  • Series: Concise Introduction to Logic
  • Textbook Binding: 672 pages
  • Publisher: Wadsworth Pub Co; 7th edition (August 11, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0534520065
  • ISBN-13: 978-0534520069
  • Product Dimensions: 6.7 x 1.3 x 9.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (36 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #402,872 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

1. Introduction to Cognitive Psychology. 2. Cognition and the Brain: Basic Principles. 3. Perception. 4. Attention. 5. Short-Term and Working Memory. 6. Long-Term Memory: Basic Principles. 7. Everyday Memory and Memory Errors. 8. Knowledge. 9. Visual Imagery. 10. Language. 11. Problem Solving. 12. Reasoning and Decision Making.

About the Author

Patrick Hurley was born in Spokane, Washington in 1942. He received his bachelor's degree in mathematics (with a physics minor) from Gonzaga University in 1964 and his Ph.D. in philosophy of science with an emphasis in history of philosophy from Saint Louis University in 1973. Since 1972 he has been teaching at the University of San Diego where his courses include metaphysics, logic, process philosophy, and legal ethics. In 1987 he received his J.D. from the University of San Diego and he is currently a member of the California Bar Association. His interests include music, art, opera, architecture and environmental issues. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

The book is still, however, a worthy purchase.
K. Straumanis
In my original review I also mentioned that I don't like the Copi and Cohen text.
Andrew T. Fyfe
This is an excellent book for students of logic.
Archie Wilson Bullington

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

59 of 65 people found the following review helpful By Andrew T. Fyfe on March 3, 2006
Format: Hardcover
I teach introduction to logic at a local community college and I used this text for my class--once. I will not again. It is overpriced, wordy, and badly structured. However, my biggest problem was that the questions the book would ask my students to answer in the homework would often (1) rely on knowledge not taught in the chapter, (2) had the wrong answer in the answer key, or (3) asked questions with many right answers but listed only one as right in the answer key.

Furthermore, the online [...] homework was way too advanced for my students to work with. It requires long load-times, Java scripts, etc. The ilrn.com site also has quite a few *kinks* to work out (automatic grading is often wrong). Unless you have a class full of students with good computers, good internet connections, and some basic internet knowledge (e.g. how to install Java into their browser); the online homework will be more trouble then it's worth. If the *kinks* are worked out and ilrn.com is programmed to require less of the computers (get rid of the Java!) then this has the potential to be a great service. Maybe, in the 13th or 15th edition this will be a good addition to the (otherwise poor) book.

I will agree with another reviewer that the "CD is unnecessary." The CD covers the same material as the book, and so either the book or the CD is unnecessary. However, the book is miserable while the CD is excellent. If anything is unnecessary, it is the book. The only saving grace for Hurley is the EXCELLENT CD-rom program that came along with 9th edition of his book. This is a 5-star computer program for learning logic and I would use it again in teaching my classes if the CD could be purchased separately.
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62 of 73 people found the following review helpful By berklaw on September 27, 2000
Format: Textbook Binding
First, I am familar with the 6th edition, so my comments concern that edition. I have both learned from (as a student) and taught from (as an instructor) this book. The book's strength is in formal or deductive logic and not informal or inductive logic. (Although it covers inductive logic and critical thinking). This book should not be used by someone who is looking just to argue better, but is much more suited to an academic setting at the level of a senior in high school or college freshman/sophmore. I am not saying that it is a hard read or too technical, as a matter of fact, it is quite basic, but it is too dry for the average reader and you would simply not pick up the information from simply reading it; you would have to work the problems and interact with others who are also reading the book.
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Format: Hardcover
Logic is something that all humans believe they practice, but few actually do it with regularity. Sometimes it is inconvenient to be logical, but the vast majority of the time it is due to a failure to understand what the rules of logic are. This book, designed to be a text for a college level course in logic, contains what you will need to be a logical person. The material is for a logic course taught more in a philosophical vein rather than in the mathematical format.
The chapter headings are:

*) Basic concepts
*) Language: Meaning and definition
*) Informal fallacies
*) Categorical propositions
*) Categorical syllogisms
*) Propositional logic
*) Natural deduction in propositional logic
*) Predicate logic
*) Induction

The exposition is conversational in tone and verbal in presentation. There are few formulas in the early chapters and there are a large number of problems at the ends of the sections. Most of the problems are textual in nature, and solutions to many of them are included in an appendix.
This book is a sound choice as a textbook in a course in basic logic; I found some of the examples used in the later chapters of value when talking about predicates in my course on the theory of computation.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By B.A.H (yekum@hotmail.com) on May 7, 1999
Format: Hardcover
This is a very nice introductionary book that justly exhaust various topics. Pros: Easy to read, and unoffensive to the readers' intelligence. Many examples, diagrams, summaries, and concatenations between the chapters are well done. Cons: Vague on some explanations, excessive in some passages, not enough answers provided for the exercises.
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11 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Hermin Hollerith, Maker of Tacky Wreaths in the 70's VINE VOICE on September 28, 2006
Format: Hardcover
It would be nice if the author gave more than a smattering of answers for the problems in the book. If your instructor doesn't give these out to you in class or you didn't purchase the study guide, you are just screwed.

Edit:
*Note: Please see review on study guide. It's not worth the money. You're better off studying the CD that came with the book. Which in all fairness, while not a work of art, does help drive home the concepts.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By K. Straumanis on November 5, 2006
Format: Hardcover
Whether or not you're planning on getting this book for a college or university course, or if you're getting it for personal interest, Hurley makes it easy to understand. The chapters are quick and easy to read, the examples and chapter problems are interesting, up-to-date, and sometimes humorous.

Unfortunately, the CD-ROM does not work with Macintosh computers. The book is still, however, a worthy purchase.
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22 of 32 people found the following review helpful By cvairag VINE VOICE on June 3, 2007
Format: Hardcover
With the advent of mass scale personal computing in the early 1980's, Logic acquired a new aura of reverence from the lords and administrators of academia. After all, Logicians invented the computer, didn't they? And computer "languages" are second-order languages, aren't they? I mean to say - your computer thinks, talks, and breathes Logic. That's part of the reason why at some schools, undergrads can now fulfill their math requirement with an Intro Logic course, why it's a requirement for graduation at others, necessary transfer credit for others. More and more students are taking Logic than ever before.

But Logic's status in the cannon is not new. Back in the late middle ages, when that quintessentially occidental innovation - higher education - began, in places like Paris, Oxford, Cambridge, and Hiedlberg, Logicians ruled the roost. In those days, the students, male monks, would spend their afternoons engaged in the Disputatio, a marathon session of argument, in which the finer points in Aristotle's Prior and Posterior Analytics (which comprise a good deal of what is discussed in Hurley) were bounced back and forth, with verbal thrusts and parries, that went by names such as Tu Quo Que and Ad Ignoratum.

Today, we have progressed to a degree, and Logic is a vast and vibrant field and discipline. Hurley is the most used introductory Logic text in the USA, probably the world. It is thought of as the standard text, supplanting Copi, used for many years. I have taught Hurley, the text used at my school, through three editions, since 2001.

My conclusion (as Hurley is wont to call that part of the argument that we in America generally refer to as the "claim") is that the perfect introductory logic textbook has yet to be written and likely will never be.
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