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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A concise, college-level reference
This weighty reference title will interest college-level and specialty collections with its concise reference to all branches of philosophy, from abstractions to ancient Egyptian philosophy. Over 2,000 entries are arranged alphabetically for quick and easy reference, representing studies of over 1,200 of the world's philosophers. The latest thoughts and developments on...
Published on January 11, 2001 by Midwest Book Review

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38 of 41 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A Nice Effor, But...
It is always a pleasure to find another high quality single volume philosophy reference. In its favor are the wide sampling of philosophical issues and personalities. There are more obscure philosophers mentioned in this text than even I knew existed. The articles tend to be fairly short and perfunctory; they will not tax the advanced student of philosophy. It is a...
Published on March 8, 2000 by Michigan Rifleman


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38 of 41 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A Nice Effor, But..., March 8, 2000
This review is from: Concise Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Hardcover)
It is always a pleasure to find another high quality single volume philosophy reference. In its favor are the wide sampling of philosophical issues and personalities. There are more obscure philosophers mentioned in this text than even I knew existed. The articles tend to be fairly short and perfunctory; they will not tax the advanced student of philosophy. It is a good general text for the layman. The advanced student of philosophy will find the text of little use. Filled with obscure philosophers and explaining Kant in half a page does not make good sense. Any one wanting a more advanced and useful single volume reference to philosophy would be much better served by the Oxford Companion to Philosophy. Though it too has its limitations, the Companion is more thorough and more scholarly.
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25 of 27 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Quite Disappointing, July 18, 2000
This review is from: Concise Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Hardcover)
Despite such a great reputation that Routledge has in the field of philosophy, this concise encyclopedia really did disappoint me. The 10 volume encyclopedia is great, no doubts about that but this concise version of it is nothing but an advertisement to the larger version.
Yes, this encyclopedia is comprehensive, it includes philosophers and philosophy from all over the world but too bad not in sufficient depth to make it meaningful enough. It is assumed that this book is for the layman but frankly speaking, all it can do is to introduce the names/terms/concepts to the layman without being able to shed more light.
If one would really want to know more, the Oxford Companion will do a better job. And if you want to know more about a particular philosopher or movement, the internet will be a better place although less authoritative.
Looks nice on the bookshelf though.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Comprehensive but can be ignorant, July 19, 2005
This review is from: Concise Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Hardcover)
I spent a few days browsing thru, to get a rough idea of what areas of philosophy I might do well to study more. For that purpose, this book seemed good.

I was alarmed, however, to find in the entry for "Skinner, Burrhus Frederick" this statement: "Both it [i.e. scientific behaviorism] and radical behaviorism have been obviated by the development of a computational theory of the mind." That's false. Radical behaviorism is the philosophy of behavior that informs the science of applied behavior analysis, of which there are thousands of practicing analysts and thousands of clients benefitting from those analysts. Computational theories of the mind are speculative, tend toward "mentalism" ( fictitous explanation) and, as yet, have yielded little if any practical benefit. Skinner expected that (physical) brain science would advance and welcomed that, but behaviorism is operating at a different level and is not invalidated by advances in brain science. Limitations in any theory of the mind, computational or otherwise, were precisely what led Skinner to a behaviorist approach. The emergence of computational theories of the mind presents nothing to lessen the problems Skinner recognizes were inherent in theories of the mind. On the contrary, study of Radical Behaviorism is all the more important so that the fictitous aspects of such theories be recognized. It was no accident that in the March 1994 issue of the American Psychological Society's magazine "Observer", president Roddy Roediger, a cognitive psychologist, in his article "What Happened to Behaviorism", suggested celebrating "the power of behavioristic analyses...even if you are one of the cognitive psychologists who believe behaviorism is irrelevant, passe and/or dead. It isn't".

Computational theories of the mind may seem intriguing, but they hardly obviate Radical Behaviorism. That such an ignorant statement was published makes me wonder about how many other similar false statements are in this book.

See if the following doesn't seem a more wise and professional way of handling the differences between the cognitive and behaviorist positions. It's from G.E. Zuriff's review of Lattal's and Chase's "Behavior Theory and Philosophy" and appeared in May 2005 issue The Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior:

"In principle, there are no decisive philosophical objections to a cognitive theory. Practically, however, there is ample disagreement over whether such a theory will, in fact, generate fruitful research progress. Cognitive psychology and cognitive neuroscience are betting that such a theory is feasible, whereas SIB [ Skinner Inspired Behaviorism ] seems committed to its unlikelihood."

An encyclopedia entry on the father of an active and fruitful philosophy and science is no place for ignorant or biased dismissal.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Kindle Version of C.R.E.P, March 7, 2012
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This is a good concise book. It certainly contains
incredible information for a quick reference and it also gives recommended readings which is important for a deeper understanding. One terrible setback for anyone
using a reference book like this -- There are no
kindle page numbers and you can't (efficiently) use the normal alternative which is to search for a philosopher's name. For example, I tried looking up Aristotle as a subject but as he was such an influence on so many other thinkers, there is an interminable list of Aristotles, none of which give a clue to whether the location you select is the one discussing him solely and his life. You can imagine how long it takes to look up someone and attain the specifics you want.
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A concise, college-level reference, January 11, 2001
This review is from: Concise Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Hardcover)
This weighty reference title will interest college-level and specialty collections with its concise reference to all branches of philosophy, from abstractions to ancient Egyptian philosophy. Over 2,000 entries are arranged alphabetically for quick and easy reference, representing studies of over 1,200 of the world's philosophers. The latest thoughts and developments on the topics make for a contemporary reference with extensive bibliographic and research cross-references.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent overall;however,the discussion of Keynes is wrong, November 4, 2004
By 
Michael Emmett Brady "mandmbrady" (Bellflower, California ,United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Concise Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Hardcover)
Overall,this encyclopedia is an excellent source of important information on philosophy and philosophers in general.I have two minor quibbles,given my interest in the work of J M Keynes.There are errors in the assessment of Keynes's A Treatise on Probability(TP)which was published in 1921.On p.233,it is ascerted that only a qualitative estimate of probability is,in general,possible in Keynes's system.On p.234,it is claimed that"...what is,at best ,known qualitatively."Again, the "what"refers to estimating probabilities.These assessments are based on the misinterpretations of chapter 3 of the TP made by A. Carabelli,B.Bateman,J.Runde and D.Moggridge concerning the meaning of the words "nonnumerical"and "nonmeasurable"used by Keynes in chapter 3 of the TP.Contrary to the above authors,Keynes meant that a single numeral could not ,in general ,be used to estimate a probability.Instead,it took two numerals to estimate a probability.Keynes is the founder of the interval estimate approach to estimating probabilities,where a lower bound and an upper bound specify the probability.Nonnumerical is clearly defined in chapter 15 of the TP on page 160 by Keynes to mean "...between numerical limits."Of course, interval estimates are subject to problems of noncomparability,nonrankability and incommensurability.However,the intervals themselves are quantitative estimates of probability.Finally,it is simply incorrect to make the following claim about Frank Ramsey:"He produced the first quantitative theory of how we make decisions".(p.777 or p.737).Keynes's interval estimate approach was combined by him with his index,w, to measure the completeness of the evidence upon which probability estimates are based and with his conventional coefficient of weight(w)and risk,c.The goal of the decision maker is to maximize cA,where A is some outcome.Ramsey,who started the misinterpretation of chapter 3 of the TP with his very poor reviews of 1922 and 1926,was second.Keynes was the first to put together a complete quantitative system of decision making.
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Concise Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Concise Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy by Editor-Routledge (Hardcover - December 28, 1999)
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