Conclave (Holy See Trilogy) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
$3.75
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: While this book has been loved by someone else, they left it in great condition. Hurry and buy it before someone else does and take advantage of our FREE Super Saver Shipping!!! (there is a chance this book could contain a gift inscription)
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Conclave Hardcover – June 13, 2001


See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$0.82 $0.01
Paperback
"Please retry"
$4.86

The Amazon Book Review
The Amazon Book Review
Introducing The Amazon Book Review, our editors' fresh new blog featuring interviews with authors, book reviews, quirky essays on book trends, and regular columns by our editors. Explore now
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 432 pages
  • Publisher: Forge; 1st edition (June 13, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0312873522
  • ISBN-13: 978-0312873523
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 1.1 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,984,609 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Whenever a Catholic priest shows up in a TV movie, it's an odds-on bet the plot involves sex or the seal of the confessional. The same holds true for this novel about American Cardinal Timothy Mulrennan, which is unabashedly reminiscent of the mid-century classic The Cardinal. Favored with the friendship of John Paul II, Mulrennan finds himself in line to succeed the Polish pope after his death. But he is also a lightning rod who draws the attacks of the Church's conservative wing; during the conclave in 2002 to elect a new pope, Mulrennan is attacked in the press by agents of Evangelium Christi, a conservative movement headed by another American, Cardinal Vennholme. Mulrennan has a couple of dirty secrets in his past, and their revelation would be a lot more dramatic if author Tobin hadn't deliberately stacked the deck in his main character's favor. When Mulrennan is blessed with visions of former popes or when his chief opponent is explicitly compared to Judas Iscariot, there's little doubt how the reader is supposed to feel. In much the same way that all hard questions become rhetorical when answered by blind faith, all questions of character and motivation become moot here. In Tobin's Vatican, there's very little of the crackling politics and vital theological debate that made Malachi Martin's The Final Conclave such a compelling read. (July)Forecast: Old-school Catholics and particularly those eager to speculate about the identity of the next pope are the core readership for this novel, which probably won't make much of a splash with general audiences.

Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

The Pope is dead, and the College of Cardinals has convened to elect a new one. In the running is 64-year-old archbishop Timothy John Mulrennan, who finds himself under attack for decades-old sins. As he analyzes the history of the Catholic Church during the last half of the 20th century and the beginning of the 21st, Tobin (The Wisdom of St. Patrick) unfolds the archbishop's life through a series of flashbacks his time as a spy in Cold War-era Berlin; a tour as chaplain in Vietnam; his work as a parish priest in Newark, NJ, during a period of civil unrest; and his directorship of an abbey in New Mexico that ministers to problem priests. Throughout, Mulrennan ponders questions of faith. His endless prayers and introspective moments may put off some readers, but this is a well-researched history of the modern Church and an excellent portrayal of a man of deep spirituality. Ronnie H. Terpening, Univ. of Arizona, Tucson
Copyright 2001 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Customer Reviews

Once I started to read the book - I couldn't put it down.
Barbara
As the current Pope ages, many Catholics like myself contemplate the election of the next Pope and the direction the church will go.
Sue
I learned a lot about the Catholic Church and their traditions which is useful to me as a Jew married to a Catholic.
Wrdjock

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 9, 2001
Format: Hardcover
I only take the time to write about a book if I hate it or love it. I loved this one. Conclave is one of those 'It's way past time to go to sleep but I can't put this down' books. I loved getting to peek behind the doors of the Vatican to see the inner workings of the church. I also cared about these characters, even the villians. It was a bit like the television series 'West Wing' only with priests rather than politicians. The main character, an American Cardinal, was especially engaging. Intensely spiritual but with feet of clay, a leader but reticent to lead, possessed of both great pride and great humility, he was a complex and surprising character. I was sorry to part company with him at the end of the book, but if any story deserves a sequel, it's this one. When the next real-life conclave occurs (in the not so distant future I expect) I'm going to feel like I have an insider's track. And perhaps life will end up imitating art. Treat yourself to this book - it's excellent.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By R.D. Barry on September 19, 2001
Format: Hardcover
This is a page-turner. I couldn't put it down. In a way,it resembles the Cardinal, a pre-Vatican II look at an Irish American priest who rises to the highest levels of the American Church. Timothy Mulrennan, however, lives in a different era and experiences some of the pivotal issues of the second half of 20th century America and the post-Vatican II Church. He is a totally sympathetic character and his humanity and compassion shine through. It is not a far-fetched account. The present pope experienced the traumas of Europe during an earlier period and reacted with similar courage. This book has two moving encounters involving Karol Wojtyla and Tim Mulrennan. If you follow Church affairs, this is a must read. As a Catholic, I would want the next pope to be someone like Tim Mulrennan. He is a moderate liberal who has a great affection for the present pontiff. Not an intellectual, but a man of action, he grapples with difficult issues and follows his conscience. Yet he is Catholic to the core and loyal to his vows. There are characters in the Church who pale in comparison with him and who he ultimately confronts. The book presents a series of flashbacks while Cardinal Mulrennan is in the conclave to elect a successor to the late pontiff. Mulrennan has enemies; people who lack his love and faith. But he also has friends, who are well-positioned and who share his vision of the church. This book is inspiring and beautiful and one terrific read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Barbara on May 31, 2001
Format: Hardcover
I just couldn't wait until I started reading this book. I am counting down as to when the sequel will be published. Once I started to read the book - I couldn't put it down. Greg Tobin is a great writer who gives the reader an "inside" view of what happens when the Cardinals of the Catholic Church gets together to elect a new Pope. This a very timely book. It shows that Cardinals are just like normal people that have their own personal problems that they have to deal with. I have been a Catholic all my life and from this book I learned things that I didn't know about the Church. I would recommend this book to anyone that wants to learn more about the Catholic Church. There were parts of the book that while I am reading made my cry.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 17, 2001
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Nelson DeMille endorsed this book with the word "old-fasheioned." Conclave is old-fashioned in the sense that if one is looking for an expose of the Roman Communion, he will be disappointed. Moreover, if one is looking for the salacious or a slam dunk on human frailty and if one takes joy in watching someone get his comeuppance, Conclave will also disappoint. The protagonist is a familiar figure because he is real, however extraordinary. It was a pleasure to walk with him, get in his head, struggle with his struggles and watch his pain and resolve, joy and obedience. I not only believe there are Tim Mulrennan's in the world, I even know some.
Conclave proabably won't appeal to Evangelicals except to "prove" how rotten is Rome. However, it should easily find a home in the hearts of readers who just love a good story and, perhaps, those who appreciate a Roman Catholic writer with a keen eye for the abuse of power and at the same time, a love of true religion. (By the way -- I'm not Roman Catholic, but I confess to being Episcopalian.)
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Christopher L. McCabe on May 17, 2001
Format: Hardcover
Greg Tobin is a fine writer with the keenest of eyes towards setting and character. Conclave, the newest novel by Tobin, is gripping -- unsparing in authentic detail. Indeed, the book is almost a crash course in Catholicism, here, in Conclave he has given us a story of a young priests humanity and morality Tobin brings the atmosphere of a place to his literary table better than many writers. The readers are transported to this place, seeing what the characters see, breathing the same air... promises made, loves realized and the haunting memories of the Vietnam War... as well as promises kept. The book works magic with clear and crisp prose, drawing the reader deeper and deeper into the story...a truly believable and heartwrenching tale...
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By AC Elliott on June 22, 2001
Format: Hardcover
Conclave is a good read even if you are not catholic. I found it highly interesting to go behind the walls of the Vatican and see how succession is arranged for the pope. The characters are interesting and their lives are revealed in snippets of information that make you anticipate the next piece of the story. The humanity and struggle of priests to find their own truth and define their own beliefs is also clearly revealed in this story. Worth the read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


More About the Author

Greg Tobin is publishing director of A.A. World Services. He is the author of multiple titles including Saints and Sinners and Holy Father (a biography of Pope Benedict XVI) and was featured widely in national and international media. He lives in West Orange, New Jersey, with his wife and sons.