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The Lost Colony of the Confederacy (Williams-Ford Texas A&M University Military History Series) Paperback – June 1, 2000

4.4 out of 5 stars 21 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

The late EUGENE C. HARTER retired from the U.S. Senior Foreign Service and lived in Chestertown, Maryland, until his death in 2010.  He was the grandson and great grandson of Confederates who left Texas and Mississippi as a part of the great Confederate migration in the late 1860s.  Harter is buried at Arlington National Cemetery.
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Product Details

  • Series: Williams-Ford Texas A&M University Military History Series (Book 69)
  • Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Texas A&M University Press (June 1, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1585441023
  • ISBN-13: 978-1585441020
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.4 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #850,596 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Based on actual events, the "Lost Colony of the Confederacy" is an interesting book that chronicles the massive immigration of Southerners who fled the former states of the Confederacy and resettled in Brazil. At the invitation of Brazil's ruler at the time, Emperor Dom Pedro II, many Confederates immigrated to Brazil to take advantage of that nation's rich natural resources and most importantly, African slaves in one of the few countries in the Americas who had not abolished slavery yet.
These settlers, known as the Confederados, resettled in the Brazilian state of Sao Paulo, and founded a town they named "Americana" where many of their descendants still reside. With Anglo-Saxon last names such as Stonewall, Jackson, and Butler, many of their present-day ancestors still reside in the Southern-inspired town and continue to live the way of life their ancestors once lived. Pecan pies, debutante balls, and Southern hymns are all still alive, although many of them have intermarried with Brazil's population and speak Portuguese as well as English (with a Brazilian-Southerner accent).
The author did great research when writing this book, and the photographs provide the reader with visuals that help us visualize Americana. Originally published by the University of Mississippi press, this updated book provides new updated information on Americana and her inhabitants
I highly recommend this book to anyone interested in the U.S. Civil War, Brazil, or Latin American culture/history. The story of the Confederados is a forgotten chapter in the history of the Civil War that should be rediscovered by all.
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Format: Paperback
I read this book not long after it was published in the 1980s and it really does reveal a chapter of the post-Civil War era that's practically forgotten today. Thousands of southerners fled the country to Brazil and their descendants still live there today in a culture that bears striking resemblances to the old South. It's a good read for anyone interested in what happened to some of those who fought on the southern side, and refused to live under Federal rule.

Even less known than the Brazil ex-pats, several thousand more went to Mexico, where they were welcomed with open arms by Mexican Emperor Maximilian. These people were hoping and planning to take their ante-bellum culture and lifestyle with them. They were shocked to find out that slavery had been outlawed in Mexico for many years, and many who were well-heeled slave owners before the war were dismayed and discouraged to learn they would have to do their own work.

While the Brazil colony succeeded, the Mexico colony was a complete failure. Most of the Confederate ex-pats gave up and went home in less than five years.Their story is told in several scholarly books, the best of which is The Lost Cause: The Confederate Exodus to Mexico, by historian Andrew Rolle. I highly recommend it.

The Mexico migration is interesting and important to me because my paternal great-grandfather was one who went, and returned four years later. I'm here today because he did come home to Texas.
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Format: Hardcover
Based on actual events, the "Lost Colony of the Confederacy" is an interesting book that chronicles the massive immigration of Southerners who fled the former states of the Confederacy and resettled in Brazil. At the invitation of Brazil's ruler at the time, Emperor Dom Pedro II, many Confederates immigrated to Brazil to take advantage of that nation's rich natural resources and most importantly, African slaves in one of the few countries in the Americas who had not abolished slavery yet.
These settlers, known as the Confederados, resettled in the Brazilian state of Sao Paulo, and founded a town they named "Americana" where many of their descendants still reside. With Anglo-Saxon last names such as Stonewall, Jackson, and Butler, many of their present-day ancestors still reside in the Southern-inspired town and continue to live the way of life their ancestors once lived. Pecan pies, debutante balls, and Southern hymns are all still alive, although many of them have intermarried with Brazil's population and speak Portuguese as well as English (with a Brazilian-Southerner accent).
The author did great research when writing this book, and the photographs provide the reader with visuals that help us visualize Americana. An updated edition of this book was recently published by Texas A&M University press, provides new updated information on Americana and her inhabitants
I highly recommend this book to anyone interested in the U.S. Civil War, Brazil, or Latin American culture/history. The story of the Confederados is a forgotten chapter in the history of the Civil War that should be rediscovered by all.
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By Lucy on November 9, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I enjoyed every page of the book because I was quite familiar with many of the descendants of the group that settled in Americana and Santa Barbara. Having spent two years in Boarding School in Piracicaba (Colegio Piracicabano)I became close friends with many of them and spent many weekends in their homes. Some of these friendships lasted a lifetime. The book gave me the background history which, as a teenager, I wasn't too interested in but, as an adult I find fascinating.
Lucy Gorham Colman
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