Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Confederate Retaliation: McCausland's 1864 Raid Hardcover – December, 1999


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$40.00 $23.52
Best%20Books%20of%202014
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 257 pages
  • Publisher: Burd Street Pr (December 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1572491132
  • ISBN-13: 978-1572491137
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.3 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,315,458 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By JB9 on January 10, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Only a small fraction of this book deals with the actual "burning of Chambersburg". A more apt title might be "McCausland's 1864 Raid[s]", or better still "McCausland and Johnson's Raids of 1864". While maps are helpful and somewhat well detailed, they're not to scale, so the distance traveled by units to engage each other is often lost. While we know what roads are available today to get to these sites, and know that they are over most of the same roadbeds as then, an overall period map that might have been viewed by the parties envolved would have been very enlightening. Still, there's not that much material out there on this topic relative to other campaigns, and this book contains a lot of information/excitement of Confederate Cavalry raids in hostile territory in a very readable format.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
My last name was McCausland before I married so naturally I was interested in reading this book. I loved it. I was a U.S. history major in college years ago and never heard about this raid. The book came in excellent condition and I pounced on it right away. I am going to pass it on to my brother for his birthday and I know he will love it also.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Hardcover
CONFEDERATE RETALIATION: MCCAUSLAND'S 1864 RAID
FRITZ HASELBERGER
BURD STREET PRESS, 2000
HARDCOVER, $34.95, 257 PAGES, ILLUSTRATIONS, MAPS, PHOTOGRAPHS, APPENDICES, NOTES, BIBLIOGRAPHY, INDEX

Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, gained national notoriety when Confederate raiders under the command of General John McCausland torched it on 30 July 1864. With an estimated population of 5,200, it was located about 20 miles north of the Mason-Dixon Line and was the military headquarters for the Union Department of the Susquehanna, with thousands of Union soldiers stationed near the town. The Chambersburg Raid was directly inspired by General David Hunter's unprovoked burning of homes of three prominent Southern sympathizers-Mrs. Henrietta Lee (related by marriage to General Robert E. Lee), Colonel A.R. Boteler and Andrew Hunter, Esquire, and of Governor Letcher's and the VMI at Lexington, as well as other acts of random vandalism. Grant had ordered Hunter to employ scorched earth tactics similar to those that would later be used during Sherman's March To The Sea. Lee was concerned enough about Hunter that he dispatched a corps under Lt. General Jubal A. Early to deal with him.

On 28 July 1864, Early placed Brigadier General John A. "Tiger John" McCausland in charge of two cavalry brigades- one cavalry brigade of 1,400 men under his command with another brigade of 1,400 men under the command of Brigadier General Bradley T. Johnson. His orders were to occupy Chambersburg and demanded $500,000 in greenbacks or $100,000 in gold as compensation for the houses that Hunter had ordered destroyed.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By M. Stuart on March 15, 2007
Format: Hardcover
I found this work sadly lacking in the one aspect that would have made this a darn good read. Background and biographical information on the antagonists of either side is woefully short. We get next to nothing in the way of background info on McCausland and his subordinates, as well as Confederate Gen. Jubal Early or the Union army ersonnel involved. Neither is information on the units involved in this campaign provided. The work is presented, in my opinion, in a way that assumes the reader is knowledgable of the war and soldiers involved. While the movements of the various units before, during, and after the raid are covered quite well, it is written in the mode of a regimental history, dry and without adding much in the way of things that would be interesting to the casual student of the war and campaign. The book reads like an hour by hour trip from Cleveland, Oh. to Philadephia, Pa., and is about as interesting.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again