Buy Used
$4.00
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: The item shows wear from consistent use, but it remains in good condition and works perfectly. It may be marked, have identifying markings on it, or show other signs of previous use.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Confessions of a Lost Mother Paperback – April, 1996


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$4.98 $0.01

Our Kids by Robert D. Putnam
Our Kids by Robert D. Putnam
Enjoy Robert Putnam's analysis on why fewer Americans have the opportunity for upward mobility. Learn more | See all by author

Editorial Reviews

Review

When she was 20 years old Elisa Barton had an out-of-wedlock pregnancy and gave birth to a baby boy. She signed the surrender papers seventy-two hours after birth. Ten months later she graduated from school and got married. Twenty years later a question appearing on her computer screen triggered thoughts and feelings that had lain dormant for over two decades. The question was: "What was it like, giving up a child?". The result of her soul searching and self-examination has resulted in a riveting book -- Confessions Of A Lost Mother. This book should be on the reading list of every highschool "family life" curriculum and on the shelves of every community library and planned parenthood clinic in the country. -- Midwest Book Review
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 157 pages
  • Publisher: Elisa M Barton (April 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0965079503
  • ISBN-13: 978-0965079501
  • Product Dimensions: 8.8 x 6 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,599,484 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.2 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 30, 1999
Format: Paperback
As a "lost birthmother" myself, just the title of this book called out to me. Reading it, I was not disappointed. Elisa Barton's book, which includes a collection of intimate thoughts and stories written by triad members also reveals the genuine camaraderie, learning and healing that can occur through Internet support groups, a medium many are yet unaware of. "Hearing" these emotions firsthand, in the writers' own words, lends credence to the oftentimes turbulent, heart-wrenching emotions of adoption and especially relinquishment. Ms. Barton adds to these tales her valuable wisdom and experience gleaned through her own poignant journey. Her "timebomb" theory is brilliant and right on target. It's something that all birthmothers can now relate to or surely will at some time in the future. I only wish I had read it before the explosion of my own "timebomb" as the insight would have been immeasurably helpful in validating my own feelings of loss and sorrow. Anyone wishing to more clearly understand the birthmother experience will benefit from reading this book.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 5, 1998
Format: Paperback
As a member of one of the Internet adoption forums that served as source for Elisa Menocal Barton's book, I have to say that the issues presented and discussed in the book are indeed international. Some of the legal aspects of adoption may vary from country to country, but the emotional side is universal. The pain of a birthmother in New Zealand, about having lost her child, is the same of that of an US Birthmother. The trauma of identity loss, and not feeling you belong in the family you grow up in, is experienced by adopted people here in the same intensity as it is in other countries. The interactions between adoption triad members in New Zealand during Elisa's visit her last year demonstrated that this book is as relevant here as anywhere else in the world. The book also highlights the power of the Net as a communication tool. Many who take part in the email discussions may have been unable, of unwilling to speak about the personal issues going on for them in a face to face meeting, but found it safe to do so in the privacy of their own computer. It is from time to time very painful to read, but should indeed be read by anyone considering adoption. It totally refutes the believe promoted some years ago that adoption is a one-off event. It is instead a lifelong process that carries over into future generations. Kees Sprengers - Wellington, New Zealand
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By maireaine@hexatron.com (Mary Anne Cohen) on June 21, 1999
Format: Paperback
This book gives the opinions and tell the stories of birthmothers and adoptees who "met" on the internet, interwoven with birthmother Elisa Barton's own story. As a long-time adoption reformer and confirmed technophobe, I was at first skeptical of the worth of internet exchange, but have since become drawn into it myself, and have come to appreciate both email communication in some forms, and this book.
Elisa is a woman of fire and conviction, which comes as a welcome change from the half-dead, wishy-washy style of many social work types in adoption. You may not agree with all her conclusions or beliefs, but you cannot doubt her sincerity or deep commitment to adoption reform and to helping her sister birthmothers.
This is a book that all involved in adoption should read--to see how deeply and often cruelly adoption has affected many birthmothers for their entire lives. It may not apply to all, but to those it does, it is real, and a story that must be told if adoption is ever to become more humane and less exploitive.
Elisa has done us all a service in telling her story, and the stories of other adoption reformers on-line. Her book is attractive, well-written, and passionate--read it!
Mary Anne Manning Cohen: Birthmother, Poet, Origins Co-Founder
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 7, 1999
Format: Paperback
Having never met my real father, what I read in this book touched me. A beautiful book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 10, 1999
Format: Paperback
This is one of the rare books that, after having read it, I can say I have grown a little bit more. Thank you Ms. Barton!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Lady and a Scholar on January 2, 2002
Format: Paperback
As an adoptee myself and as a birthmother who has been found by my birthdaughter, I can state that many if not most adoption experiences are not what the birthparent expected when they placed their child up for adoption. When I placed my child, I was quite specific about the qualities I wished in the birthparents and was promised that they would be fullfilled. All these many years later, I find that my child was just sold to the highest bidder! After raising 3 other daughters myself, I have decided that the coercion which is used on most birthmothers to make them believe that financial advantage is preferred over nurturing advantage is so totally without merit it is laughable. My child was adopted; she was treated kindly until her adoptive mother had a birthchild of her own. After that, she was abused (as was I in my adoptive parent's home)physicially and emotionally. (That would never have happened in my home; my children adore me because I was a warm and loving mother.) Society too often portrays the birthmother as some slummy little tramp with not enough brains to keep her legs together and the adoptive mother as a woman of high class and a paragon of virtue. This books reverses that picture. The book may sound bitter, but then alot of birthparents are bitter about the lies they were told and the way they have been portrayed. Especially 25 years ago, birthmothers weren't given the choices they are now. Knowing what I know now, I wouldn't give my pet dog to an adoptive parent.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews