Confessions of a Prep School Mommy Handler: A Memoir and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $17.99
  • Save: $2.23 (12%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 6 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Want it Tuesday, April 22? Order within and choose One-Day Shipping at checkout. Details
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Eligible for Amazon's FREE Super Saver/Prime Shipping, 24/7 Customer Service, and package tracking. 100% Satisfaction Guarantee.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

Confessions of a Prep School Mommy Handler: A Memoir Paperback


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$15.76
$1.66 $0.01

Frequently Bought Together

Confessions of a Prep School Mommy Handler: A Memoir + At Least in the City Someone Would Hear Me Scream: Misadventures in Search of the Simple Life + It's All Relative: 2 Families, 3 Dogs, 34 Holidays, and 50 Boxes of Wine (A Memoir)
Price for all three: $40.41

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 249 pages
  • Publisher: Three Rivers Press; 1st edition (August 12, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0307382710
  • ISBN-13: 978-0307382719
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 5.3 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (26 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #977,018 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In this memoir showcasing the ugly side of the affluent mothers of the pseudonymous Tate Academy , among the country's most prestigious prep schools, Rouse, the school's director of public relations, explains that his job is that of the Mommy Handler—keeping the families and benefactors of the institution happy. In particular, he works closely with a woman he calls Kitsy, the head of the parent and alumni committees and the ringleader of a group he dubs the M2s or the Mean Mommies, a troublesome squad of beautiful women whose self-appointed job it is to maintain Tate's legacy of exclusionary ways. The tales of superficial demands and backhanded nastiness, as well as the quest for a standardized idea of perfection portray a scene worse than a suburban PTA meeting of Stepford wives. But Rouse, whose first memoir, America's Boy, chronicled his life growing up gay in conservative middle America, justifies silently stomaching it all with a candid explanation of his overwhelming need to be accepted by the in-crowd. Rouse's personal journey toward self-realization is highlighted by moments of compassion for students who are similarly ostracized for not being attractive, athletic or wealthy enough. Sadly, he never actually speaks up for fear of the M2s. Rouse's writing is fresh and funny, and the stories of Botox parties, catty mothers and manicured pet pups make this an amusing insider look into the opulent lifestyle of prep school families. (Sept.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From Booklist

Some jobs are decidedly unenviable, but Rouse may have the most unenviable of all: mommy handler. OK, his real title is "director of public relations" for a tony prep school (renamed Tate Academy here). But the job, at its core, is to deal with the very rich, very demanding, very unkind mothers of the school's so-very-fabulous students. His memoir opens during carpool-lane duty, where Wade is accosted by Kitsy Ludington, who becomes his nemesis of the year. Kitsy is the supreme Mean Mommy, and Wade's tales of his misadventures with her are hilarious. Take, for example, the time he tried to drop off an invitation to her home only to find he had stumbled into a Botox party with a Doogie Howser–like "doctor" at the helm. Even as Wade makes strides at understanding what makes these ladies act the way they do, he finds himself the target of their insecurities—and it doesn't end pretty. But Wade's irreverent look at his career at Tate is laugh-out-loud funny and full of charm, candor, and a boatload of cattiness. Wilkens, Mary Frances --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

More About the Author

Wade Rouse
Author Bio

Wade Rouse is the "laugh-out-loud-funny" (NBC's Today Show), "wise, witty, wicked" (USA Today), "engagingly funny memoirist" (Chicago Tribune) who is a "hybrid of "David Sedaris and Dave Barry" (Library Journal) and "Erma Bombeck's lovechild" (Advocate). Rouse "beautifully combines humor and pathos" (Out Magazine), and has quickly established himself as "an original writer and impressive new voice" (The Washington Post) whose "combination of honest emotion and evocative prose is destined to be a hit!" (St. Louis Post-Dispatch). In short, Wade Rouse is "hilarious, riotously funny, catty, and an absolute delight!" (Christian Science Monitor)

Wade Rouse is the author of four, critically-acclaimed memoirs, including America's Boy (Dutton/2006), Confessions of A Prep School Mommy Handler (Harmony/2007), and the bestsellers, At Least in the City Someone Would Hear Me Scream: Misadventures in Search of the Simple Life (Harmony/2009), and It's All Relative: A Memoir of Two Families, Three Dogs, 34 Holidays and 50 Boxes of Wine (Crown/2011). He is also the creator and editor of the upcoming, humorous dog anthology, I'm Not the Biggest Bitch in This Relationship: Hilarious, Heartwarming Tales about Man's Best Friends by America's Favorite Humorists (NAL/2011), which features a foreword by Chelsea Handler and her dog, Chunk.

The IndieBound bestselling It's All Relative: A Memoir of Two Families, Three Dogs, 34 Holidays and 50 Boxes of Wine asks and attempts to answer the question, "How come the only thing my family tree grows is nuts?", in blisteringly funny detail. The book deals with America's obsession with picture-perfect holidays and celebrates Rouse's imperfect family--a chatty yet loving mother, an eccentric engineer of a father, a marvelously Martha Stewart-esque partner, a garage-sale obsessed set of in-laws, and an oddball collection of relatives--through the yearly celebrations that bring out the very best in our nearest and dearest. Rouse paints a funny, sad, poignant, and outlandish portrait of an all too typical family that will have you appreciating or bemoaning your own. "It's rare to find a book that is both funny and mean, family-intensive and gay-friendly, gossipy and sweet. It's All Relative is all of the above!" Minneapolis Star-Tribune

At Least in the City Someone Would Hear Me Scream chronicles the misadventures of two neurotic urbanites who quit their jobs, and leave the city, cable, couture and consumerism behind in order to move to the Michigan woods and recreate a modern-day Walden. At Least in the City Someone Would Hear Me Scream was a national bestseller, 2009 Best Book of the Year by B&N, and named a Must-Read by NBC's Today Show, Detroit Free-Press, St. Louis Post-Dispatch, St. Petersburg Times, Out, MetroSource Magazine, Chicago Magazine, Chicago Public Radio, Michigan Public Radio, St. Louis Magazine, Frontiers Magazine, among others.

Rouse's first memoir, America's Boy, which chronicles his life growing up gay in the Ozarks thanks to the unconditional love from an unconventional family, was named by Border's as a Best Book (Literary Memoir) of 2006, "A Best Book of 2006" by the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. a 2006 BookSense selection by the nation's independent booksellers, an inaugural "Rainbow" pick for GLBT young readers by the American Library Association, and a PFLAG "Required Read". The American Library Association recently named it as one of the top 100 GLBT books.

His second memoir, Confessions of A Prep School Mommy Handler, about his tenure as PR director at an elite prep school where he quickly learns his "real job" is to cater to a Lilly Pulitzer-clad clique of "Mean Mommies," was selected by both Barnes & Noble and Target as a Breakout Bestseller, and hailed as "funny" by Entertainment Weekly. The memoir is about job discrimination and the incredible pressures facing faculty, students and parents today.

I'm Not the Biggest Bitch in This Relationship features essays by some of America's favorite funny writers and comics, including Chelsea Handler, Jen Lancaster, Laurie Notaro, Bruce Cameron, Jane Green, Stephanie Klein, Beth Harbison, Alec Mapa, Jeff Marx (Tony winning creator of Avenue Q), Rita Mae Brown, Jill Conner Browne and many others. A portion of the book's proceeds will benefit The Humane Society of the United States.

Rouse was a contributor to the humorous anthology on working in retail, The Customer Is Always Wrong: The Retail Chronicles (Counterpoint-Soft Skull Press). Rouse's essay on working at Sears after years of wearing Husky's was selected to kick off the collection.

Rouse is a contributing humor columnist for Metrosource magazine, and TheBeachCoast.com, and a regular contributor to Michigan Public Radio. His essays and articles have appeared in numerous national magazines and online publications, including Forbes.com, which reaches nearly 10 million readers, as well as on CBC Radio One's popular "Definitely Not the Opera" in Canada and Chicago Public Radio. He has lectured and taught writing seminars around the country, from The Chicago Public Library to the Erma Bombeck Humor Writers Workshop. Rouse is represented by the Random House Speakers Bureau - alongside such luminaries as Ken Burns, Jay McInerney, Richard Russo, Jane Smiley, Gay Talese, Roy Blount Jr., and Lisa See - and is available for select readings and lectures. To inquire about a possible appearance, please visit www.rhspeakers.com or call 212-572-2013.

Rouse's personalized, intense and transformational writing retreats - which center on overcoming fears in one's life and one's writing - and provide insider advice on securing a literary agent and finding success as a fulltime author, have been credited by numerous writers for helping their manuscripts be published by mainstream publishers. For more, please visit www.WadesWriters.com.

He earned his B.A. in communications (with honors) from Drury College (now University) and his master's degree from Northwestern University's Medill School of Journalism.

Rouse lives on the coast of Michigan, where - in between beach weather and blizzards - he writes memoirs and battles for bed space with his partner, Gary, and their beloved mutt, Mabel. Wade is a volunteer and fundraiser for Wishbone-Paws For A Cause, an animal shelter in Michigan, a member of HRC, and supporter of Hospice. He is a marathon runner, avid reader and movie/theatre buff, and addicted to fashion, hair, lip shimmer, reality TV and non-fat, triple shot white chocolate lattes.
Wade is represented by literary agent Wendy Sherman of Wendy Sherman Associates in Manhattan, and the Random House Speakers' Bureau.
For more, please visit
www.WadeRouse.com
www.WadesWriters.com (writing retreats & classes)
www.rhspeakers.com

Find me on Facebook and Twitter

Customer Reviews

This book, the second I have read from this author was entertaining.
Douglas J. Peters
The personal narrative didn't work effectively and the premise itself would have worked better if jazzed up as fiction.
Six43
I just wanted to hug him and tell him it was ok to let go of this horrible job and live his life!
muggletrixie

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By E. Caspari on September 20, 2008
Format: Paperback
Wade Rouse's second memoir is extremely amusing for anyone who has seen prep school from either the in or out crowds' perspectives. I suspect that most premier prep schools have their share of the Mean Mommies mocked in this memoir. That said, those from the St. Louis area will find this especially entertaining.

Following its publication, Rouse conducted a number of interviews. He refused to confirm or deny that Tate Academy was inspired by the years he spent as Director of Communications at a toney local prep school. If you want to identify the school, the information can be googled, but I don't want to spoil the fun. Local press interviews with graduates and staff at the school indicated that they all understood what school was being discussed. St. Louis natives who answer the "which high school" question will doubtless enjoy trying to identify the country club and some of the characters. Rouse stated that every hilarious incident, including when a 90+ year old alum chugged whiskey and pushed him down a staircase during a school event, was based on an actual experience. For those of you from the hallowed halls of Tate, you may find his catty digs cut a little close to the bone. It all depends which crowd you were in and how seriously you took it all.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Bookreporter on October 16, 2007
Format: Hardcover
On any given weekday morning, rain or shine, you could find Wade Rouse in the carpool lane of Tate Academy helping to direct traffic, usher kids into school and placate the concerns of parents. Rouse was not a crossing guard or even a teacher, but the director of publicity at the prestigious mid-western school.

In his latest memoir, CONFESSIONS OF A PREP SCHOOL MOMMY HANDLER, the author of AMERICA'S BOY recounts his life at the beck and call of a few of the super rich and snobby mothers of Tate students. While publicity is ostensibly his job at Tate, Rouse soon learns that his primary responsibility is handling overly involved and not very kind mommies. For him, the carpool lane comes to symbolize his demeaning work at the school.

Rouse is clever, funny and kind, but not to himself. His low self-esteem is attractive to the ladies he dubs "the mean mommies," especially to Katherine Isabelle Ludington, or "Kitsy." Kitsy, a Tate alum and the parent to young Tate student "Mitsy," decides to become deeply involved in both the major and minor happenings on the busy Tate calender. These are the events that Rouse is generally in charge of, and somehow, over the course of the year, he ends up being her assistant. Rouse is desperate to turn her down but is unable to do so. She humiliates him, manipulates him emotionally and buys him off with expensive gifts, yet he still wonders if she in fact may be his first adult female friend.

It is not necessary to have read Rouse's first memoir, in which he talks about his childhood and young adulthood, to fully understand where he is coming from in CONFESSIONS, but it does help a little. Rouse grew up in the rural south in an eccentric but caring family. He was gay, overweight and unpopular.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By J. HERRON on March 13, 2010
Format: Paperback
Not very original, no plot, no believable characters...I wouldn't really recommend it. This is a collection of short anecdotes arranged in chronological order and it all sounds so over the top and composite character-like.
If you really want to laugh about prep school mommies, read Acceptance by Susan Coll.
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Snowboard Queen on September 17, 2007
Format: Hardcover
No doubt this tell all satire will sell out quickly in St. Louis where everyone
who attended "Tate" will be trying to assimilate the characters.
The book is well written, but the characterization is way over the top.
Perhaps I feel this way because I attended "Tate" for a dozen years.
Regardless, it is a delicious catty read not to be taken too seriously.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Leah on March 8, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I loved this book. It was raw and so deep. I cried when Wade was reading to the old woman because it was so tender and because it seemed to give him respite from such harshness-harshness he felt toward himself. I am amazed that he had the courage to withstand that lifestyle for so long.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Vickie L. Harris on September 14, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Love this book. Great writer. I have read all of Wade Rouses books and each seems better than the last.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By R. Marrs on March 25, 2013
Format: Paperback
Hysterical and witty. Well written and couldn't put it down. It's a great account of prep school moms, struggles to fit in and finding yourself.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By MIGirl on February 20, 2013
Format: Paperback
Not so far from the truth - as someone who attended "Tate" for 6 years.

Laugh out loud funny - a characterization of quite a few Mom's (and maybe even my own a bit)... Quick read, good for a quick airport trip or the beach.

While there is a certain faction, who does behave this way - it's certainly not the tone/experience of the school at large.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search
ARRAY(0x9f86118c)