Confusing - what are differences between WR-100, WR-125 and WR-300 Having dyslexia it is next to impossible to go back and forth comparing this and now I totally disoriented. Why doesn't Amazon have comparisons?

I do not "get" the SAME or FIPS reference - what are they? I feel like I need a degree in something just to select a weather radio which living in Kansas/Missouri is really a necessity. What is the word for these alphabetical references and how are we supposed to know what they mean.

I feel borderline retarded when it comes to this technical stuff. Actually, I'm very intelligent I just have problems relating back and forth to stuff with nonsensical numbers and letters and combinations thereof. My preferred/first-choice solution is to just say to heck with it and give up but I really need a weather radio. I bought one a few years ago which never did anything ever and so I eventually threw it out. I hate wasting money and/or time but so far that's all I've done. Please HELP?
[UPDATED] asked by Kotton Kandee on April 30, 2012
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Showing 1-8 of 8 answers
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To make it a simple decision, buy the WR-300.

Why? Because a weather radio that goes off in the middle of the night for a thunderstorm watch can easily end up unplugged due to the annoyance. The WR300 can be set to only go off for life threatening events like a Tornado WARNING (an actual tornado, not a watch for one).

The SAME or FIPS codes are the codes you'll need to enter (the interface on weather radios is usually terrible, it doesn't have to be, but they usually are for some reason) to set the radio to only alert you to alerts for your county (or you can set it to the also go off for surrounding counties if you live near a county line).

SAME & FIPS are the same thing. Here's the manual (P 17)
http://www.midlandradio.com/Resource_/OwnerManual/196/WR300-301%20Revised%205-27-11.pdf
"The National Weather service divides the United States by state and county (or parish)
and assigns a six digit code number called a FIPS (Federal Information Processing System)
code, also known as a S.A.M.E. county code.'

Specific Area Message Encoding or SAME is the protocol used to encode the Emergency Alert System (EAS) and NOAA Weather Radio's SAME Public Warning System in the U.S. and Weatheradio Canada in Canada.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Specific_Area_Message_Encoding

The FIPS county code is a five-digit Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS) code (FIPS 6-4) which uniquely identifies counties and county equivalents in the United States, certain U.S. possessions, and certain freely associated states.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FIPS_County_Code

If you want to look up your SAME/FIPS code that you use to set your radio to only alert for specific counties in the area covered by your NOAA radio station, you might check out the list on
http://www.nws.noaa.gov/nwr/indexnw.htm
P. Erson answered on May 2, 2012

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I bought it after posting the review. Yes, I am glad to have one that can turn off all but the actual warnings (no more 3am thunderstorm watch alerts).
The interface is fine with the manual. I know it could be done better, but they dont seem to have enough competition to firce that.
P. Erson answered on June 24, 2012

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The 300 also includes radiation & biological alerts among many others. Prudent to have in these times. Runs off batteries too for when the power goes out. I also have a hand crank radio. Belts and suspenders.
Robert Jacoby answered on November 20, 2013

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I presume your have the wr 300. Are you satisfied with it?
Henry T. Lawrence answered on June 24, 2012

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Thank you for taking the time to answer my questions. Good advice and good info!
Kotton Kandee answered on May 2, 2012

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The WR-300 is the best option for the reasons mentioned above.

HOWEVER....no single device can be a substitute for common-sense. I use my weather radio primarily for situations where there's a Tornado Watch lasting through the night (where I may need to be woken up suddenly via a loud siren) or when my children are home without me (and thus probably aren't paying attention).

Otherwise, I simply monitor the situation via NWS.gov and my local TV/radio stations when I know there's a Tornado Watch. I also have an app for my smartphone that alerts me at work if there's a Tornado Warning for my county.

Don't count on just your weather radio to protect you. If you're serious about mitigating risk, redundancy and self-alertness are the key.
Arthur Compton answered on August 19, 2012

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I've been trying to find a weather radio and am just getting frustrated and confused reading reviews. I'm almost ready to give up but unfortunately living in tornado alley that's not an option. I think I'll go with the above recommendation and hope for the best.
Bookworm answered on May 26, 2012

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[Deleted by the author on Jun 26, 2012 3:21:43 PM PDT]
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