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Congo Dawn Paperback – February 1, 2013


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 496 pages
  • Publisher: Tyndale House Publishers, Inc. (February 1, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1414371586
  • ISBN-13: 978-1414371580
  • Product Dimensions: 8.2 x 5.5 x 1.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (103 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #112,046 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

*Starred Review* The Congo, a place with a past as murky as the rivers trailing through its rain forest, is home to some of the world’s best natural resources and worst treatment of its citizens. When former marine lieutenant Robin Duncan accepts a private contract to work as a translator in securing molybdenum mining rights for a large corporation, she presumes the mission to be straightforward. However, the warning of a local villager, “Woe to those who call evil good and good evil,” begins to ring true as Robin discovers the miseries the Congolese are suffering as a result of international corporate interests; hunts down a killer; and confronts her past when she meets up again with Michael Stewart, a fellow marine who betrayed her trust and who harbors his own painful memories. Congo Dawn marks another brilliant foray by award-winning Windle (Freedom’s Stand, 2011), a child of missionaries, into the ambiguous worlds of war-torn regions. She effortlessly blends journalistic objectivity, humanitarian interest, faith-based inspiration, and the struggle of individuals to determine what is right. Windle’s writing is engrossing, and this tale of moral suspense is a must-read. --Carolyn Richard

Review

"Windle comes off a highly acclaimed pair of books on Afghanistan (Veiled Freedom, Freedom's Stand) and moves into the jungles of the Congo. . . . The author doesn't limit character development to [protagonist] Robin Duncan, but also deeply develops accessible and multidimensional African characters. Inverting the Heart of Darkness trope of self-discovery in the jungle, this story sheds light through a great faith struggle . . . " Publishers Weekly, December, 2012

"Congo Dawn marks another brilliant foray by award-winning Windle (Freedom's Stand, 2011), a child of missionaries, into the ambiguous worlds of war-torn regions. She effortlessly blends journalistic objectivity, humanitarian interest, faith-based inspiration, and the struggle of individuals to determine what is right. Windle's writing is engrossing, and this tale of moral suspense is a must-read." American Library Association Booklist, January, 2013

More About the Author

As child of missionary parents, award-winning author and journalist Jeanette Windle grew up in the rural villages, jungles, and mountains of Colombia, now guerrilla hot zones. Her detailed research and writing is so realistic that it has prompted government agencies to question her to determine if she has received classified information. Currently based in Lancaster, PA, Jeanette has lived in six countries and traveled in more than thirty on five continents. Those experiences have birthed 16 international intrigue titles, including bestselling Tyndale House Publishers release Veiled Freedom, a 2010 ECPA Christian Book Award and Christy Award finalist and sequel Freedom's Stand, a 2012 ECPA Christian Book Award and Carol Award finalist and 2011 Golden Scroll Novel of the Year finalist. Check out author interviews, reviews, and more at Jeanette's website: www.jeanettewindle.com

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
5 star
58
4 star
29
3 star
12
2 star
0
1 star
4
See all 103 customer reviews
As you can tell from the bio, Jeanette Windle is good at doing research.
Gabrielle
Robin is a compassionate deep thinker who struggles to understand how God can allow so much pain and suffering in the world.
Narelle Atkins
Not only is she a good writer, her story line is well laid out, her character's realistic, and her plot well developed.
Amazon Customer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Melanie on February 4, 2013
Format: Paperback
I don't recall ever having read any of Jeanette Windle's books before Congo Dawn, so I didn't have any idea what to expect. This isn't my typical kind of book (I'd label it international suspense), but I did end up liking it.

I have to say, though, it did take me a long time to get into the story (100+ pages) - mainly because of all the details in the beginning - and I seriously considered not finishing because of how bored I got, BUT the next 300+ pages totally made up for it! That's when the main action/suspense began for me and I really enjoyed it from then on.

My favorite character would have to be Dr. Michael Stewart. I just really liked how he acted and he seemed like a great guy. Robin grew on me and I ended up really liking her in the end. I also liked the little bit of romance that was in Congo Dawn. I loved one of the themes in the book - Good vs. Evil; Light in Darkness.

Overall, I liked Congo Dawn and found it informative about different topics (i.e. The Congo, mining, corruption, etc.). I'm glad I took the time to read it and if you generally enjoy these types of novels, then I think you will also like Congo Dawn.

*I received a complimentary copy of this book for my review. I was not required to give a positive review, only my honest opinion - which I've done. All thoughts and opinions expressed are my own.*
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Davalynn Spencer on January 30, 2013
Format: Paperback
Just when you think you have it figured out, you don't.

Author Jeanette Windle once again captures her readers in story, this time with Congo Dawn, the tale of a conflict-zone rainforest teeming with danger, deception, and greed. Her sensory-rich setting naturally pits exquisite characters against each other in a war of wits and weapons, but all is not as it seems. Evil reigns and the innocent die. The strong simply take what they want while others lay down their lives to stop the greed.

Trevor Mulroney, CEO of global mining consortium Earth Resources, sweeps into the Democratic Republic's northeastern province of Ituri, a mineral-rich area ripe for exploitation by outside forces. Mulroney also conveniently owns Ares Solutions, the private military corporation hired to stop a murderous insurgent threatening the mining operation.

Former U.S. Marine lieutenant Chris R. Duncan signs on as the Ares Solutions team linguist. Trouble is, Christina Robin Duncan is not what Mulroney--or any of his hired mercenaries--expected.

Duncan's former military comrade, Michael Stewart, is now a physician member of Doctors Without Borders working in an Ituri village near the mining site. But regardless of his skill and unselfish service to the DRC, he's still the man who broke Duncan's heart five years earlier and let her beloved brother die in Afghanistan.

The title Congo Dawn could be construed as a cruel contradiction in one of the world's darkest nations, except that it isn't. Light in the midst of darkness? Absolutely. And love. A man and woman's love, villagers' love, God's love.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Pauline Evans on August 19, 2013
Format: Paperback
Congo Dawn is a gripping story set in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Good and evil come into conflict in a variety of ways, and one major theme is that it's not always clear which side is which. Finding the courage to do what is right is another, as well as forgiveness for past wrongs.

The reader also learns some of the history of the Congo, as well as its current political and economic problems. Neither the moral nor history lessons, however, overshadow a well-told story that keeps increasing in suspense.

There is one chapter, in the latter part of the book, where the action slows down briefly for an extended discussion of how God brings good out of suffering. I enjoy books that discuss ideas as well as tell a great story, and it's a lesson relevant to everyone. I just hope readers with less patience for such discussions won't rush through it, eager to get on with the action.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By j.staples on June 30, 2013
Format: Paperback
Congo Dawn was a pleasant surprise compared to other Christian fiction books I've read lately. The Congo setting was interesting. There were a few twists and turns. However, I gave it three stars because the book was still pretty predictable. And it was preachy. I agreed with all the doctrine and the message of the story and the message of hope and healing through Jesus. I just wished the author had woven that message better throughout the story and not had to include these dialogues that were really just mini sermons.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Patricia M. Gonzales on March 27, 2013
Format: Paperback
I'm not a person who follows politics or the international scene very closely, but this book, set in a dark corner of the world, drew me in from page one and held my attention to the very last word. I have never read any previous work by Jeanette Windle, but this book was well worth my time.

Main character Robin Duncan has one goal in mind when she takes an assignment with an international corporation. Drawing on her past experience as a marine lieutenant, she fills the position of interpreter on a security team seeking to safeguard a Congolese region threatened by a ruthless killer. She needs the money to help pay for life-saving surgery for her niece.

The mission finds Robin confronted with situations she had not expected to encounter, both on personal and professional levels. She comes face to face with Dr Michael Stewart, the man she once loved and for whom she still harbors bitterness at his betrayal involving her brother's death. Just when it seems she and Michael have cleared up their misunderstandings, another situation comes along to make them wary of each other.

Robin begins the mission with complete faith in the good intentions of her superiors. She learns that the people she thought she could trust are embroiled in a deceitful, profit-seeking scheme. The insurgent the team seeks to capture, originally perceived as the evil enemy, may have motivations for his actions that are more justifiable than she could have imagined. All is not as it seems, and the division between good and evil blurs into a mass of confusion.

The author has crafted realistic characters who persevere in the face of adversity, show outstanding courage when confronted with danger, and base their decisions on compassion and love.
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