Connected: An Autoblogography about Love, Death and Technology 2011 PG CC

Amazon Instant Video

(29) IMDb 5.7/10
Available in HD

Webby Awards founder, Tiffany Shlain, investigates the connections between the major issues of our time and her own experiences during a family crisis.

Starring:
Leonard Shlain, Tiffany Shlain
Runtime:
1 hour 21 minutes

Available in HD on supported devices.

Connected: An Autoblogography about Love, Death and Technology

By placing your order, you agree to our Terms of Use. Sold by Amazon Digital Services, Inc. Additional taxes may apply.

Product Details

Genres Documentary
Director Tiffany Shlain
Starring Leonard Shlain, Tiffany Shlain
Supporting actors Leonard Shlain, Tiffany Shlain
Studio Docurama
MPAA rating PG (Parental Guidance Suggested)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 3-day viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Other Formats

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
5 star
22
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
4
1 star
2
See all 29 customer reviews
It really makes me think what really matters in life.
Yan Wang
She makes us think about the relationships between intimacy and connection, love and fear, utopia and the destiny of mankind.
Seth J. Goldstein
Thank you for creating such a great film that speaks of the struggles we have to balance our human and technology world.
Twin2SF

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Mattie on October 15, 2013
Format: DVD
This film never seems to find a direction, barely touching on interesting topics such as honey bees and corn syrup, cellular phones and cancer, as well as pollution. Even the director's own mess of a diagram makes no sense, so she relies on her father to connect "the dots." Speaking of which, 50% of this film is an exploitation of a dying man, which should be meant for a family video, not a mainstream documentary. Don't get me wrong, it's an understandable reaction to upcoming loss and grief, but it's the kind of footage that most would put into a vault after mourning because it ends feeling macabre.

Now this film builds a premises of the Left Brain analyzes logically, and that the Right Brain focuses on Art, Emotional Connections, and finding patterns. Pattern Finding is not associated with the right brain any more than the left, which is why there are both intuitive-thinkers (NT's) and intuitive-feelers (NF's). Intuitives focus on past and future, finding patterns from theory on down, where sensors are solidly in the present, aware of all five senses, and form opinions form the ground up. It's clear that the director is a sensing-feeler, even advising to stay present and giving in to instant gratification.

What is not covered in this film is techno-stress, and the increasing desocialization of our youth. Where once students would talk and pass notes in class, now they text and tweet, relying on technology instead of genuine interpersonal relationships. The director encourages this trend as a good thing, because of dopamine released. You get the same release pulling the lever on a slot machine, so does that mean diving into casinos is healthy, and creating a better world?
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By R. Hall on August 25, 2013
Format: DVD
Tiffany Shlain talks about herself a lot to be so connected to everything. Starting with a quote about interconnectedness by John Muir and sprinkling in far too little of the theories of her father Leonard Shlain she throws in vague connections from cellphones to radiation to her pregnancy without much thought. I suggest reading her fathers books. He was a doctor with very interesting ideas. She invented the Webby Awards which picks best cat memes. Tasked with such a big topic as "Everything is connected" she falls short of interesting let alone an overview. Also try James Burke's BBC documentary series Connections 1,2 & 3 which must have inspired her fathers work and is far superior to this documentary.
Connections 1 James Burke
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: DVD
A rambling mish mash of ideas, thoughts and contradictions. The movie mentions overpopulation, despite this she went through great effort to have another child after the age of 35. The movie mentions how the world is polluted with consumerism and over consumption, but if everyone has an internet connection the world will be better. She is optimistic, maybe that optimism will be the end of humanity, despite knowing better, we just do what we want because somehow humanity will connect and figure it all out; I doubt it, this movie just makes me feel the impending doom of humanity.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Butte Irish on June 24, 2014
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
A great collection of info coupled with a great story of love and family connection. I am grateful for the chance finding on PBS and glad to find it here~
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By daniel r hennings on November 26, 2013
Format: Amazon Instant Video Verified Purchase
I was disappointed the only part i liked was the fisherman lying in the boat, but I wish the creator the best she turned a hard time in her life into a positive and that I respect.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Seth J. Goldstein on February 2, 2013
Format: DVD
Connected is a film that makes you think. It ponders the largest questions in the universe and the most intimate questions of the heart. Tiffany Shlain simultaneously explores her lifelong relationship with her Dad who was her best friend, confidant , cheerleader, mentor and role model as he fights his battle with brain cancer and death and her most curious questions about the role of the internet in society today and in the future. She makes us think about the relationships between intimacy and connection, love and fear, utopia and the destiny of mankind. Big stuff, hard topics and tender moments. This documentary christened the 21st Century with a foreshadowing of what's next, what happened and why are we here. Loved it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Nichole Jackson on February 2, 2013
Format: DVD
Human responsibility is complex; priorities are often contradictory. In the Twentieth Century, postmodern writers and artists transformed mediums to allow for paradox, but it was not until the twenty-first-century film Connected: An Autoblogography About Love, Death, & Technology that audiences could collectively experience the visual, textual, and emotional beauty of holding complex inconsistencies while moving toward personal growth and global connection. Director Tiffany Shlain exposes the journey by which the global film she set out to make began to kick, cry, and nurse itself into being something more authentic-- more connected--than any one viewer can articulate. Perhaps there's irony in merely writing a review of a film whose visually articulated thesis proposes the new century's possibilities are unleashed by the exponential increase in access to images. Shlain's hypothesis that a technologically interconnected world exercises each individual's image centers can be evidenced now--from the drifts of snow over which Shlain's father first released her from his view to the digitally mastered web of connections that refuse to release the globe from its collective potential, the images in Connected transform viewers into visionaries who don't have to eliminate the contradictions of their connectedness.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search