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A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court [Kindle Edition]

Mark Twain
4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (384 customer reviews)

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Book Description

"A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court" is Mark Twain's classic tale of Hank Morgan, a resident of 19th century Hartford Connecticut who is inexplicably transported to the early medieval England of King Arthur. A classic satire, "A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court" pokes fun at the romanticized notions of chivalry and the idealization of the middle ages. A delightful and enchanting tale, "A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court" shows Twain at his satirical best.


Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Gr 5 Up-While Mark Twain is most often identified with his childhood home on the Mississippi, he wrote many of his enduring classics during the years he lived in Hartford, Connecticut. He had come a long way from Hannibal when he focused his irreverent humor on medieval tales, and wrote A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court. The hit on the head that sent protagonist Hank Morgan back through 13 centuries did not affect his natural resourcefulness. Using his knowledge of an upcoming eclipse, Hank escapes a death sentence, and secures an important position at court. Gradually, he introduces 19th century technology so the clever Morgan soon has an easy life. That does not stop him from making disparaging, tongue-in-cheek remarks about the inequalities and imperfections of life in Camelot. Twain weaves many of the well-known Arthurian characters into his story, and he includes a pitched battle between Morgan's men and the nobility. Kenneth Jay's narration is a mix of good-natured bonhomie for Hank and more formal diction for the arcane Olde English speakers. Appropriate music is used throughout to indicate story breaks and add authenticity to scenes. This good quality recording is enhanced by useful liner notes and an attractive case. Younger listeners may need explanations of less familiar words, and some knowledge of the Knights of the Round Table will be helpful. Libraries completing an audiobook collection of Twain titles will enjoy this nice, but not necessary, abridgement.

Barbara Wysocki, Cora J. Belden Library, Rocky Hill, CT

Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

Review

"Dufris's enthusiastic narration is perfect; the deep drawl he produces might very well be the voice of Twain himself, and his pacing and comedic timing will delight listeners." ---Publishers Weekly Starred Audio Review

Product Details

  • File Size: 568 KB
  • Print Length: 402 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 0543903508
  • Publisher: Digireads.com (March 30, 2004)
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B000FC1CT6
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #452,870 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
86 of 88 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of Twain�s Greatest! April 14, 2003
Format:Mass Market Paperback
This book--at times disjointed, rambling, self-referential, and irreverent--is decades ahead of its time. It's an interdisciplinarian's dream as Twain takes on economics, geography, politics, ancient and contemporary history, and folklore with equal ease. Mostly though, one appreciates his knack for exaggeration, the tall tale, and the outright lie. It's a triumph of tone, as he lets you in on his wild wit, his keen observation, and his penchant for bending the truth without losing his credibility as a guide.
The book's structure is also modern: He recounts his days as a paddlewheel steam boat "cub," piloting the hundreds of miles of the Mississippi before the Civil War, then, in Part 2, returns to retrace his paddleboat route. Although a few of his many digressions don't work (they sometimes sound formulaic or too detailed) most of the narrative is extremely entertaining. Twain seems caught between admiration and disdain for the "modern" age-but he also rejects over-sentimentality over the past. He writes with beauty and cynicism, verve and humor. Very highly recommended!
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169 of 185 people found the following review helpful
By Kiwi
When you do the "Look Inside" thing, you'll read "This view is of the Mass Market Paperback edition (1983) from Bantam Classics. The Paperback edition (2010) from General Books LLC that you originally viewed is the one you'll receive if you click the Add to Cart button at left." And that's correct. The General Books LLC version is a completely different book. To wit....

General Books LLC puts together books using an OCR automated scanning device which can miss complete pages. There are many many Typos and no table of contents. There books receive NO EDITING of any kind, also, the OCR scanning is done by a robot (which the publishers website outright says can miss pages). This is all stated on the publishers web site (google them and read for yourself to get all the details). Almost every review of books published by General Books LLC (around 500,000 of them from one imprint or another now listed on Amazon) by buyers is negative, many are extremely so.

As the General Books LLC version has reviews of other publishers versions associated with it, you need to be very careful to make sure you've bought a decent version. If you have bought the version from General Books LLC by mistake, you can return to Amazon within 30 days(but check Amazon's Return Policy for the details).
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51 of 55 people found the following review helpful
Format:Mass Market Paperback
Let me guess: your total exposure to Mark Twain came in high school, when you were forced to read about the antics of Huck Finn or Tom Sawyer, right? Well, now that you've reached adulthood, you should make time to read _Life on the Mississippi_. It's mandatory reading if you live in a state that borders the great river, anywhere from Minnesota down to Louisiana. It's mandatory reading if you have come to that point in life when you can suddenly appreciate American history and post-Civil War stories written by someone who lived through that time.
Writing in the first half of the 1870s, Twain retraces the steps of his youth: the watery highway he knew when he trained to be a riverboat pilot nearly 20 years earlier. He speaks of how life _was_ along the river, and what life _became_. It's almost a "you can't go home again" experience for him, while the reader gets the benefit of discovering both time periods.
I have two favorite parts that I share with others. Chapter IX includes a wonderful dissertation about how learning the navigational intricacies of the river caused Twain to lose the ability to see its natural beauty. And Chapter XLV includes an assessment of how the people of the North and the South reacted differently to the war experience. If I were a social studies teacher, I'd use that last passage in a unit on the reconstruction period. So put this title on your vacation reading list, and don't fret: the chapters are short and are many -- 60! -- but you can stop at any time, and the words go by fast. _Life on the Mississippi_ should make you forget all about any Twain trauma and report-writing you may have suffered as a teenager. [This reviewer was an Illinois resident when these comments were written.]
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27 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Book I Would Choose On A Deserted Island. December 9, 2009
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
I found this to likely be the most interesting book I have ever read. The attention to detail and description place you within the story. This book is actually, I believe, an autobiography of Mark Twain's (Samuel Clemmons) life as a young man piloting steamboats up and down the Mississippi River.

Whether the man, Mark Twain, interests you or not, Life on the Mississippi, is an eye opening look at America in an earlier era.

In my (humble) opinion this is Mark Twain's best work.
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21 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Killer classic...Serious Message with Big, Big Humor! December 13, 2005
Format:Mass Market Paperback|Verified Purchase
What a great novel! Twain is wonderfully funny, yet his scathing social commentary concerning his own times are as serious as a heart attack.

When a Connecticut Yankee gets sent back in time to King Arthur's Court, he decides his superior knowledge should be used to educate such an "ignorant race." Of course, we all know that the road to hell is paved with good intentions, and if I didn't know better, I would say that the person who coined the phrase did so after finishing this novel. The story's main character, Hank Morgan, is a likeable, if not laughable character, yet as most of us already know: absolute power corrupts absolutely. Once technology gets on a roll, the beast of civilization takes off running and Morgan cannot pull in the reigns. Total disaster ensues (incase you had not already guessed).

This was a fun read and a look at a problem that is still very much alive today. Too much civilization can be like a disease, especially when those who are working to spread it find that they are doing it for reasons other than altruism.

Also, do you remember the scene in "Raiders of the Lost Ark" when Indiana Jones whips out his gun to shoot the sword-wielding Sultan? That scene was surely lifted from this very book!

Trust me, this is a novel for thought, but one that will not bore you. Twain was a master and this is perhaps my favorite of his novels. Very highly recommended.
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Choice for an Audio Book
Fantastic story and fantastic reading. The reader was perfect for Mark Twain's style. This book made our 14-hour drive bearable. Read more
Published 6 days ago by SDH
5.0 out of 5 stars Mark Twain
I have always loved reading Mark Twain. He has been an inspiration into my reading. His books have been the reason for me to read.
Published 11 days ago by Tonya osborne
4.0 out of 5 stars Very good. Interisting.
Very good. Interisting.
Published 13 days ago by AlfromPA
5.0 out of 5 stars Good reads all
One of the best pieces I have read in sometime. Who else writes like Samuel Clemens? A river boat pilot no less!
Published 15 days ago by Terence A. Wright
3.0 out of 5 stars Good, not great.
It's a good piece of history. Not great, just good. I felt l8ke I was there. But there were more exciting things going on than learning how to pilot a river boat.
Published 21 days ago by Pet dad1
5.0 out of 5 stars Great classic
If you don't like Twain's political polemics, you can skip them. The story crackles and has some really funny episodes. It is early science fiction and a good read.
Published 22 days ago by Timothy Fohl
5.0 out of 5 stars enjoyable read
Sam is always a joy to read. This book has many side stories in it which are enjoyable. You feel like you are riding on a riverboat.
Published 24 days ago by dennis c. cook
5.0 out of 5 stars A classic
A classic work of American fiction by a master, Mark Train. Kindle version a great addition to my Kindle library.
Published 25 days ago by William Collins
3.0 out of 5 stars i had not known this story was so good
I bought this book to try out the audio book service at amazon. The narration was very good but did not synch up correctly with the ebook. Read more
Published 27 days ago by Amazon Customer
4.0 out of 5 stars A Connecticutt. Yankee in King Arthur's Court
I just like Mark Twain's style of writing and his imagination. It is an easy read and he is a very good story teller.
Published 1 month ago by William A. Henwood
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More About the Author

Mark Twain (1835-1910) was an American humorist, satirist, social critic, lecturer and novelist. He is mostly remembered for his classic novels The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and The Adventures of Tom Sawyer.


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