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A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court Paperback – September 19, 2013

ISBN-13: 978-1613823774 ISBN-10: 1613823770

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 362 pages
  • Publisher: Knight's Publishing (September 19, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1613823770
  • ISBN-13: 978-1613823774
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 2.8 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #625,632 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

<DIV>"Dufris's enthusiastic narration is perfect; the deep drawl he produces might very well be the voice of Twain himself, and his pacing and comedic timing will delight listeners." - --Publishers Weekly Starred Audio Review</div>

Customer Reviews

I'm into this book by 100 pages and I am going to stop.
Just Me
A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court is a comedic novel written by Mark Twain.
Savannah Moore
The interesting thing about this book is that Mark Twain is the narrator!
Rick O

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Rick O on November 8, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
If you think Bing Crosby's 1949 movie was anything like Mark Twain's fantasy classic published in 1889...Forget It! Like the precursor novels,'Gulliver's Travels' written in 1726 by Jonathan Swift and 'Alice in Wonderland' written in 1865 by Lewis Carroll were made into movies that are barely representative of the original novels. The film starring Bing Crosby was a musical / comedy only touching on the very basic part of Twain's novel.Mark Twain's view of England's Lifestyle in 528 was very harsh pertaining to church and throne to say the least.On page 246, he says..." if one could but force it ( manhood ) out of its timid and suspicious privacy, to overthrow and trample in the mud any throne that ever was set up and any nobility that ever supported it". The book has none of the film's niceties, instead it graphically tells of unjust hangings,stake burnings, murder, slavery, and an unfair caste system. This is a brilliant novel written 113 years after the Revolutionary War and 24 years after the Civil War. The contents truly reveal Mark Twain's political and social views, which I think are worthy of the study they have received. For further information on his thoughts see: 'Autobiography of Mark Twain: Volume 1, Reader's Edition (Mark Twain Papers)'.

In the year 1879, Hank Morgan ( his name is only mentioned once ), an arms factory foreman, gets into a fight with a man named Hercules ( no, not him ) and wakes up under a tree in King Arthur's Camelot in the year 528! He is captured by the less then adequate knight, Sir Kay. At first Hank thinks he is in an insane asylum, but then as he is brought before The Knights of the Round Table to receive justice, he realizes that he really is in the sixth century.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Ellen Sue Perry on March 6, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The story is great. However, this version is missing the Word of Explanation which sets up the whole story. My son was reading this for school and - not knowing the section was missing - was completely lost for understanding. After reading the whole book, and trying to discuss the story with him, we made the horrible discovery that this edition was missing this critical piece. Make sure you buy a complete edition and not this one.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Rocco Dormarunno on September 5, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition
As the 19th Century turned into the 20th, Mark Twain took a trip to England. According to the story, it was then when he came upon the idea of a science fiction, time-travel novel in which a "modern" man would be transported more than a thousand years back into time. If you know your Twain, you know what this man, Hank Morgan, would find.

Decidedly opposed to the romantic, Sir Walter Scott view of Arthur's Camelot, Morgan finds a heap of filthy, swinish, barbaric people who have no problems with slavery or with brutally oppressed citizens called "freemen". It is a world filled with ignorance, bigotry, Church-inspired hate, jealousy, hypocrisy and all the other elements of humanity that Twain revels in mocking. Hank tries to bring hygiene, democracy and education to these masses (which, of course, would change history--but such modern sci-fi ramifications wouldn't bother Twain). True to form, while Hank Morgan brings with him all the conveniences and improvements of his time, he is also a victim of his own vanities. Not surprisingly, Hank also subjects the middle ages to the weaponry and death machines of the 19th/20th centuries. So much for modern man's contributions.

This is a stunning novel. Maybe you know about Huck Finn, Jim, Tom Sawyer and Becky. If you don't know Hank Morgan, you don't know Twain.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Tom Bruce on May 17, 2013
Format: Paperback
In his forward to his book, "Once There Was a War," John Steinbeck wrote: "Mark Twain in `A Connecticut Yankee' uses the horrifying and possible paradox of the victor's being killed by the weight of the vanquished dead." Well, I had no idea what he meant by that, so I decided to read Twain's book. This is not the Mark Twain I know who wrote about life on the Mississippi, Tom, Huck, and a jumping frog. No, indeed; totally different. Except it has the Twain sarcasm and humor written all over it. Picture this: a mechanically inclined tradesman from the 19th Century wakes up in 6th Century England with full knowledge of the life he had left behind, a life which contained telephones, telegraphs, newspapers, democracies, freedom from slavery, bicycles, baseball, and so much more. He uses his knowledge and cunning to become second in command to King Arthur and take on Merlin the Magician, Sir Lancelot and the Knights of the Round Table, and other villains from a time long ago. Another interesting side of Twain shows through as he includes several short tirades against the Catholic Church, one of his targets in later life. You will have to read to the climax of the book to learn what Steinbeck meant, but it will be well worth it. I do take away one star, however, for Twain's excessive verbiage in his garbled Olde English conversations. But, even he admits he couldn't make heads or tails of a lot of what's said and lets it pass without thinking too much about it. As did I.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Slokes VINE VOICE on November 7, 2012
Format: Paperback
Mark Twain was one of the United States' greatest writers, but not one of its most brilliant novelists. A case in point is this 1889 novel, "A Connecticut Yankee In King Arthur's Court."

The plot has been redone so many times as to make a synopsis here seem pointless. The title character is a practical-minded factory superintendent from Hartford laid out by a crowbar-wielding worker and transported to the time of King Arthur. After conning the locals by anticipating an eclipse and pretending he has blotted out the sun, the Yankee sets to work reforming Arthur's kingdom in slow degrees, earning the wrath of the wizard Merlin among others.

The novel's defenders point out that while written in the guise of a children's novel, "A Connecticut Yankee" is a cleverly subversive satire that ridicules tradition and progress simultaneously. For seven-eighths of the book, however, it is neither a fair nor a scintillating fight. Our hero, Hank Morgan, is the book's narrator, and perhaps unreliable, but Twain offers no hint of this as Morgan and Twain mock the customs and puncture the myths of this bygone day, informing us whatever existed then couldn't hold a candle to the present day.

"Somehow, every time the magic of folderol tried conclusions with the magic of science, the magic of folderol got left," Morgan explains.

As the book develops, Morgan builds up the society he finds with modern conveyances, including trains, guns, and telephones. At one point in the story, knights ride to battle on bicycles.

Anachronism soon devolves as the main source of humor for the book, along with the narrator's off-handed way of telling us about the people he meets, none of whom impress him.
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