Qty:1
  • List Price: $22.50
  • Save: $3.48 (15%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Sold by
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Connecting readers with great books since 1972. Used books may not include companion materials, some shelf wear, may contain highlighting/notes, may not include cd-rom or access codes. Customer service is our top priority!
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Conquest of Abundance: A Tale of Abstraction versus the Richness of Being Paperback – May 1, 2001

ISBN-13: 978-0226245348 ISBN-10: 0226245349

Buy New
Price: $19.02
28 New from $13.59 17 Used from $8.02
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$19.02
$13.59 $8.02
12%20Days%20of%20Deals%20in%20Books

Frequently Bought Together

Conquest of Abundance: A Tale of Abstraction versus the Richness of Being + Against Method + The Tyranny of Science
Price for all three: $50.59

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
12 Days of Kindle Book Deals
Load your library with Amazon's editors' picks, $2.99 or less each today only. Learn more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 303 pages
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press (May 1, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0226245349
  • ISBN-13: 978-0226245348
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.8 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #770,335 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Feyerabend (1924-1994) was the preeminent antisystemic philosopher. His most famous work is the aptly titled Against Method. This posthumous work--half unfinished manuscript, half related essays compiled by Bert Terpstra with the help and support of Feyerabend's widow--attempts to understand how the scientific worldview gained its foothold and at what cost to experiential richness. Feyerabend is enthralled by the posited split between appearance and reality that exploded in the philosophies of Xenophanes, Parmenides and Plato and that was countered by Aristotle's insistence that specific practices involve specific virtues, divorced from any transcendent good. From that starting point he explores the scientific worldview--the reigning view of Western civilization--and articulates what he believes has been gained and lost by such a commitment to categorization and abstraction. Feyerabend's habit of repeatedly returning to key examples--heightened by textual overlaps between essays and unfinished manuscript--should draw readers into his idiosyncratic exploration of how knowledge is acquired and named, radically deepening their understanding of the issues at stake. Feyerabend displays a marvelous knack for bringing alive fully rounded views. The result is a first-rate and consistently pleasurable meditation on epistemology. 19 illustrations. (Jan.)
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From Library Journal

Best known for Against Method (1975), his critique of the philosophy of science, and for his autobiography, Killing Time, Feyerabend (1924-94) was working on this tentatively titled volume when he died of a brain tumor. Completed via Feyerabend's notes, letters, and lectures, it is a fascinating work. Feyerabend argues that humans have an innate desire to simplify reality into stereotypes and that since the Renaissance this has been done largely through the methods of science, resulting in the loss of a rich part of reality. Using examples from various disciplines, he argues persuasively that no one epistemology has priority over others. The ascendancy of science has been examined in greater detail--in Morris Berman's The Reenchantment of the World, for example--and Feyerabend does not carry his arguments as far as Berman. However, as an antidote to the claim that a particular epistemological paradigm is superior to others, Feyerabend's book warrants serious consideration. Recommended for all libraries.
-Terry C. Skeats, Bishop's Univ. Lib., Lennoxville, Quebec
Copyright 2000 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
2
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

27 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Omar N. Ali on September 11, 2001
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The philosopher of science and contrarian anarchist thinker, Paul Feyerabend, was born in Austria in 1924 and died in 1994. At the time of his death, he was working on a book tentatively titled "conquest of abundance". In his autobiography "killing time", he said of this book:
"The book is intended to show how specialists and common people reduce the abundance that surrounds and confuses them, and the consequences of their actions...I also try to emphasize the essential ambiguity of all concepts...without ambiguity, no change ever... Conquest of Abundance should be a simple book, pleasant to read and easy to understand...one of my motives (is) ...to free people from the tyranny of philosophical obfuscators and abstract concepts such as "truth", "reality", or "objectivity", which narrow people's vision and ways of being in the world".
After his death, his widow cooperated with Bert Terpstra to produce this book from the notes and essays that he left behind. The book consists of four chapters put together (very scrupulously) from Paul's notes; followed by 12 essays that he had written on similar themes. It is a collage rather than a systematic and well-organized argument, but considering that Paul Feyerabend was the pre-eminent anti-systemic philosopher of the twentieth century, this is quite appropriate!
The first chapter presents an episode from the "odyssey" and Feyerabend uses it to argue his contention that "potentially, every culture is all cultures". Every cultural trait possesses an ambiguity that allows its meaning and usage to be modified by creative individuals as the need arises.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By J. Michael Showalter on August 11, 2000
Format: Hardcover
This is the only book that Feyerabend really meant for a popular audience-- not that he was really a very esoteric philosopher to begin with. But, in this text, he comes across as brilliant, engaging, and very erudite and posits a case for how we think... and how we classify reality....
If you haven't read any Feyerabend.... as hated as he is by scientists, etc. he is worth reading. REALLY worth reading.... and this is perhaps the best place to start....
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Frank Bierbrauer on March 28, 2001
Format: Hardcover
The wonderful, idiosyncratic and radical philosopher of science Paul Feyerabend, has written a book about the historical eradication or diminishment of the full richness of being itself. By this he means the experience of each and every human being on the planet with the totality of his/her culture, thoughts, feelings, prejudices, opinions and so on and so on. This is of course wildly expansive and demonstrates the variety as experienced by people everywhere. Feyerabend's main contention is that, over time, and through the gradual abstraction practised by select people, often philosophers or "scientists" or anyone who is pulled in this direction through his/her education, influence of others or a bent away from the "scary real world", the fullness of one's world is slowly made barren, empty of life. Anyone who grows up in the education system of the Western world can confirm this idea (the teachers of Robin Williams calibre aka "Dead Poet's Society" are few and far between). Unfortunately, science especially has been progressively dehumanised not through a need to objectify but rather through the belief that this is necessary or the "real" world will escape us. Now more than ever this is powerfully evident and as Feyerabend notes: "...the arts whose popularity at any rate far outweighs that of the sciences eg rock music, film etc" (pp 261). No longer, or infrequently so, are readers captivated by the incredible intuitive power of an Aristotle or a Heraclitus. There is a general need for something which should replace the now discredited world religions, science or the abstraction it now stands for is not it.Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Frank Bierbrauer on March 17, 2001
Format: Hardcover
The wonderful, idiosyncratic and radical philosopher of science Paul Feyerabend, has written a book about the historical eradication or diminishment of the full richness of being itself. By this he means the experience of each and every human being on the planet with the totality of his/her culture, thoughts, feelings, prejudices, opinions and so on and so on. This is of course wildly expansive and demonstrates the variety as experienced by people everywhere. Feyerabend's main contention is that, over time, and through the gradual abstraction practised by select people, often philosophers or "scientists" or anyone who is pulled in this direction through his/her education, influence of others or a bent away from the "scary real world", the fullness of one's world is slowly made barren, empty of life. Anyone who grows up in the education system of the Western world can confirm this idea. Unfortunately, science especially has been progressively dehumanised not through a need to objectify but rather through the belief that this is necessary or the "real" world will escape us. Now more than ever this is powerfully evident and as Feyerabend notes: "...the arts whose popularity at any rate far outweighs that of the sciences eg rock music, film etc" (pp 261). No longer, or infrequently so, are readers captivated by the incredible intuitive power of Aristotle or Heraclitus. There is a general need for something which should replace the now discredited world religions, science or the abstraction it now stands for is not it.Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?