Conscientious Objections and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $13.95
  • Save: $1.39 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 5 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Conscientious Objections:... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Good | Details
Sold by giggil
Condition: Used: Good
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Conscientious Objections: Stirring Up Trouble About Language, Technology and Education Paperback – March 3, 1992


See all 8 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$12.56
$4.75 $0.01
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
Take%20an%20Extra%2030%25%20Off%20Any%20Book

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Take an Extra 30% Off Any Book: Use promo code HOLIDAY30 at checkout to get an extra 30% off any book for a limited time. Excludes Kindle eBooks and Audible Audiobooks. Restrictions apply. Learn more.

  • Get a $150 Amazon.com Gift Card: Get the Citi ThankYou® Preferred Card and earn a $150.00 digital Amazon.com Gift Card* after $1,000 in card purchases within 3 months of account opening. Learn more.

Frequently Bought Together

Conscientious Objections: Stirring Up Trouble About Language, Technology and Education + The Disappearance of Childhood + Technopoly: The Surrender of Culture to Technology
Price for all three: $34.20

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Vintage; 1st Vintage Books ed edition (March 3, 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 067973421X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0679734215
  • Product Dimensions: 5.1 x 0.6 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #566,547 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

In a delightful series of pungent essays (some originating as talks), Postman takes on a variety of contemporary cultural phenomena including television (and its deleterious effects), language, the crisis in education, politics, and social "science," to list a few. The concluding piece, "My Graduation Speech" (offered freely for use), is alone worth the price of the book, but Postman's keen observations and thoughful concerns are equally apparent throughout. Readers of his earlier works ( Teaching as a Subversive Activity , Amusing Ourselves to Death , and The Disappearance of Childhood ) will also applaud this. Highly recommended to academics and the general public. Suzanne W. Wood, SUNY Coll. of Technology, Alfred
Copyright 1988 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Review

"Postman is that rare social critic whose commentary on the current state of American culture and education is a funny as it is throughout and well argued...a provocative collection." -- The New York Times Book Review



"Postman uses cogent arguments, sharp needles and gentle humor to challenge readers to change their ways of thinking ... delightful." -- St. Louis Post Dispatch

More About the Author

Neil Postman was chairman of the department of communication arts at New York University. He passed away in 2003.

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

30 of 31 people found the following review helpful By Jeffrey S. Bennion on April 12, 1999
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book contains essays and chapter excerpts from most of his other works (though not the later ones like Technopoly and The End of Education). Neil Postman is one of the keenest and most articulate of that species I call the "cultural hand-wringers". I'm very sympathetic to the arguments he makes, though sometimes I think he may be a bit too dire. I've read everything he's written that I can get my hands on, and all of it has been a total delight. (I'd steer any Postman fans to Robert Hughes _The Culture of Complaint_ for similarly keen, delightful, and refreshing take-no-prisoners denunciations) Since so much of his work is a complaint about how form (e.g. TV) has coopted function, I hardly think Postman himself would approve of this kind of recommendation, but he's so much fun to read even if you *don't* agree with him that it's worth the effort anyway. But watch out: he's so persuasive and passionate with his arguments, you'll probably end up doing so no matter how well-armed you are against it.
Two essays that have stuck in my mind: "The German Question" where he ponders what the Holocaust consciousness will mean to postwar Germany, and "The Small Screen" where Postman is invited to write something nice about television for once.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
28 of 35 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 2, 2002
Format: Paperback
I have admired Neil Postman ever since the days of Teaching As a Subversive Activity. It's thus with regret that I can't recommend this collection of essays. I found little insight, much condescension, and even more of what in his opening essay he sneered at social scientists for doing: stating the obvious as if it was profound discovery.
That opening essay, "Social Science as Moral Theology," in which he attempts - and fails - to show that sociologists, psychologists, and the like are "storytellers" rather than scientists, is a prime example. (Since my background is in physics, I should have been expected to be sympathetic to Postman's view. That I still found it so unconvincing should be an indication of how weak his argument is.) Just a few examples:
- He defines "science" in a way that excludes social sciences - an utterly invalid method by which anyone can "prove" literally anything.
- He derides as meaningless non-science studies linking TV viewing with aggressive behavior because they haven't come to any clear conclusion. (Astronomers still can't agree on how galaxies form. Are they not doing science?)
- He misstates scientific process and misdefines "empirical" as requiring "natural life situations," by which standard all of quantum physics and much of relativity physics are likewise non-scientific "storytelling."
- And frankly, anyone who gleefully writes about how he sprang a well-considered line of argument on a professor and brags that "it did not take me long ... to reduce her to saying" such-and so is not engaging in rational argument but ego-tripping.
What makes this all the more frustrating is that in subsequent chapters he does not hesitate to use some of the same methods he denounces as "storytelling" - demographic surveys, intergroup comparisons, etc.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Gary J. Malone (gmalone@clearinfo.ie) on August 19, 1999
Format: Paperback
The book probably is a good summary of Neil Postman's ideas if you're new to him, but if you've already read his major works there's not much here to recommend. In fact, some of the ideas and even the prose can be pretty slack at times. Should pique the interest of newcomers, however.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By D. D. on March 23, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book of essays and articles nicely consolidates the different themes that Postman wrote about over the years. Most of the ideas here are further detailed and explored in his single topic books, such as his flagship book on television AMUSING OURSELVES TO DEATH and TECHNOPOLY. Certainly the material here will be familiar terrain to Postman veterans, but there are a few gems that still make it worthwhile. I initially refrained from buying this book because much of it was pre-published material and I'd assumed familiarity from what I'd already read in his other books. However, selections like "Alfred Korzybski" and "My German Question", in which Postman describes a 1985 trip to Germany he was commissioned to take and write about were fantastic new material. But for a reader new to Neil Postman this is the perfect book.

No one will agree with everything they read in this book. I certainly don't. The thing is, there's a voice here of a sort that I just can't find in today's culture critics. It's an entirely human voice, one still dubious about the ceding of formerly human domains to technology. One that isn't going to speak to you as a statistical amalgam of ideas or vaguely take you for granted as a political opponent or ally. One of the reasons that I think Postman's books are even more important now than they were 20 or 30 years ago is that he so perfectly documents his portion of our transition from a literate to electric society. As time passes we obviously have less people speaking who were around before certain technological changes took place. The younger generations are often unaware of their new environment and it's effects as anything but compulsory or even natural.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?