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A Conscious Life: Cultivating the Seven Qualities of Authentic Adulthood Paperback – December 1, 1995


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Conari Press (December 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0943233763
  • ISBN-13: 978-0943233765
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 5.7 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #920,318 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

What eaxtly does it mean to be an adult. What constitutes maturity in our culture today? In A Conscious Life: Cultivating The Seven Qualities Of Authentic Adulthood, Fran & Louis Cox explore the issues of adulthood by presenting personal stories and offering psychological principles as a way of redefining adulthood in terms of consciousness rather than chronology. A Conscious Life provides a refreshing look at what adulthood can andshould be, contrasting the idea of "grown up" with that of the truly healthy adult. The authors' model is a departure from the accepted norm of adulthood upon the age of 21 and the recent trend of delaying adulthood past the troublesome twenties. Guidelines and examples help readers break out of the cycle of their parents lives (experienced as the children). Also provided, is information on how to avoid being controlled by emotional "triggers". -- Midwest Book Review

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Mike S on March 30, 2000
Format: Paperback
If you ever wondered why you feel like a child hiding in an adult's body playing "grownup", this book is for you. The authors clearly explore the differences between "grownups" and "adults". "Grownups" are cut-off from their feelings and base their behavior on surface behavioral norms. "Adults" however, are able to comfortably integrate all their feelings without splitting them into "child" and "adult". The authors explain in a clear way how our self is a constant that all too often is parsed into pieces in order to satisfy the perceived expections of other "grownups". Afterall, we don't cross a magical threshold seperating childhood from adulthood.
I enjoyed the book so much I bought four copies to share with family and friends.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Matt W Sandford on July 23, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
With a warm and transparent style, the authors propose that most of us through our growing up years have experienced wounds that train us to cope in unhealthy ways and to become "grown ups" rather than adults, meaning we fake it or get by the best we can. They offer seven elements of authentic adulthood and describe the differences of living as a "grown up" versus an adult in these areas. The concepts that they describe involve self awareness and acceptance, an understanding of personal boundaries, having an internal sense of safety, learning that my emotions are of great value and that I can learn from them about myself, learning what it means to live in the moment, and then defining and delving into the concepts of personal power and limits. The authors do a wonderful job of exploring each concept and modeling what it looks like to believe and think and feel like an adult, meaning someone who is learning to grow up from the training and misguided beliefs that resulted from a childhood that taught us to cope by pretending rather than to live authentically.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 8, 1997
Format: Paperback
The authors contrasted characters of grownup with those of adult. Being adult means shedding of defensive and reactive mechanisms of grownups that shield oneself from experiencing the richfulness of life. Only when truly value the worthfulness and purposeful from inside, recognizing both power and limitation of human being, can one breaks free from the bondage of perfectionism and self-doubtfulness. A highly readable guide of personal growth and development
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Wonderful book by a doctor who puts it in simple terms and good examples that explains why you should break that child-inherent need approval for what you do and are from parents, and later from all others, in order to feel good about yourself. The book makes it so logical and easy to see why that is normal for a dependent infant and child, but needs to be eliminated as part of reaching maturity—so you obsess less (or not at all) about invalid or arbitrary opinions or views of others about you. Very logical and very easy to grasp.
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful By JHDScot on August 15, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A therapist friend recommended this book but frankly, it is so dense that I found it hard to get through. I feel certain the concepts are good but there must be a better way to learn them than from this turkey.
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