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Consciousness and the Computational Mind (Explorations in Cognitive Science Series) Paperback – January 1, 1987


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Consciousness and the Computational Mind (Explorations in Cognitive Science Series) + Language, Consciousness, Culture: Essays on Mental Structure (Jean Nicod Lectures)
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 376 pages
  • Publisher: Massachusetts Institute of Technology Press; 1st edition (1987)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0262600196
  • ISBN-13: 978-0262600194
  • Product Dimensions: 8.8 x 5.9 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,250,696 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

" Consciousness and the Computational Mind is provocative, highly informed, and essential reading for anyone interested in a scientific understanding of the mind." Science



" Consciousness and the Computational Mind is a provocative, highly informed, and essential reading for anyone interested in a scientific understanding of the mind." Science

About the Author

Ray Jackendoff is Seth Merrin Professor of Philosophy and Codirector of the Center for Cognitive Studies at Tufts University. He is the author of many books, including Foundations of Language.

More About the Author

Ray Jackendoff is Seth Merrin Professor and Co-Director of the Center for Cognitive Studies at Tufts University. He previously taught at Brandeis University. He is Past President of both the Linguistic Society of America and the Society for Philosophy and Psychology, and he was awarded the Jean Nicod Prize in cognitive philosophy in 2003. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Ray Jackendoff's research spans many aspects of linguistics and cognitive science, including syntax, semantics, music cognition, spatial cognition, social cognition, and consciousness. He also performs as a classical clarinetist, and has recorded two CDs of music for clarinet and piano.

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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A classic. Some stuff is dated, but much is still relevant.
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Mark A. Weiss on January 27, 2009
Format: Paperback
Usually the joy in a philosophy book is in all the distinction-making and the drawing-of-implications of a contention, and so forth. The usual structure is "You think that this distinction is the one that needs debating, BUT ACTUALLY the important distinction is NOT that one -- so it doesn't even matter which side wins that debate; instead MY DISTINCTION is the important one; here's why." Of course it is always possible that another person might come along and disparage THAT distinction. You get the idea. What a pleasure it is, then, to see a different structure and a different result. Some of the structure is per usual. I guess it must be -- otherwise it wouldn't be philosophy. Philosophy without distinctions between distinctions would be like math without any corrolaries to theorems. But the difference here is that EMPERICAL PHENOMENA are used for evidence amidst the distinctions and hypothesized structures. So convinced am I that the author HAS DISCOVERED how it (the human brain) really works (in overall structure) that I say that this book is like the bible. And I don't mean in ANY religious way at all. Rather, I think the author has revealed THE TRUTH. (I'm a philosophical realist -- even in Quantum Mechanics I believe those wave functions themselves exist, but this is an aside). That is, I believe I now KNOW what the structure of the brain's function really and truly is. All the more so because I MYSELF ADDED TO THE EMPERICAL EVIDENCE of the author. (No it is not published.) Before saying what this evidence is, though, just that fact itself -- that a different phenomenon than that/those used to create the theory follows directly from the theory -- says the theory is a good one.Read more ›
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