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Comment: Good. Nice book. Binding tight. Underlining and highlighting in first 27 pages. Only one mark in rest of book. Front cover has crease. No crease in spine. Rubber stamp on top edge of pages. Slightly turned corners on front cover, with few pages behing cover with turned corners also. No remainder marks. Not a former library copy. Non-smoking. Eligible for free super saver or Amazon Prime shipping. Ships from Amazon's warehouse and backed by Amazon's excellent customer service.
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Consciousness Reconsidered (Bradford Books) Paperback – December 10, 1993

ISBN-13: 978-0262560771 ISBN-10: 0262560771 Edition: Reissue

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Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Philosophy professors Searle and Flanagan throw light on recent debates over the meaning of human consciousness and its relation to the natural world.
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Review

This is a marvelous book. Its central claim is that within a broadly conceived naturalism there can be a coherent, probing, insightful theory of consciousness. Flanagan examines more problems and topics associated with consciousness than any other philosopher since William James!

(George Graham, Professor of Philosophy, University of Alabama, Birmingham)
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Product Details

  • Series: Bradford Books
  • Paperback: 234 pages
  • Publisher: A Bradford Book; Reissue edition (December 10, 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0262560771
  • ISBN-13: 978-0262560771
  • Product Dimensions: 5.8 x 0.5 x 8.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,330,758 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

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Flanagan does not answer his dualist critics, such as David Chalmers, at great length.
Zettel
Consicousness is the brain, but understanding the brain will not cause you to experience somebody elses consciousness.
Carlos Camara
This book is of considerable interest for anyone seriously studying the philosophy of mind, or cognitive neuroscience.
Steven H Propp

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

23 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Carlos Camara on July 6, 2002
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is one of the early philosophy books that started to make sense on the issue of consciousness. Comming from a decade where Joe Levine told us there was a gap, Frank Jackson that materialism left something out, McGuinn told us we could not understand it, the Churchlands wanted to get rid of the thing, this book is a great relief. Consciousness, according to Flanagan, is a natural phenomenon, rooted in the brain. IT is real, capable of being defined, it evolved, and tractable scientifically. We need not despair, nor look in wrong and exotic places like quantum mechanics. Psychology, phenomenology, neurobiology and cognitive science will do. This is useful philosophy.
In the first chapter, Flanagan sketches the field of philosophy of consicousness. He defines the different positions (consicousness is mysterious, consciousness does not exist, consciousness does not matter, consciousness is unintelligeble, consciousness is miracolous, etc..) and argues for naturalism and the adequacy of science to take on the job. In chapter 2, he shows why elimination of the concept of consicousness will not do. Surely, the concept is ot clear, but it points to a real phenomenon in need of explanation. In chapter 3, Flanagan talks about consciousness and the brain, how and why it evolved, and tries to make clear that there is nothing strange about the idea that cosnciousness might just be the brain itself.
IN chapter 4, Flanagan discusses qualia. He concentrates on Dennetss position that qualia should be eliminated scince nothing could have the properties philosophers claim qualia has. Flanagan agrees, but rightly notices that quala need not refer to that which philosophers talk about. Qualia are real, and there is something like to be in a phenomenal state.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Daniel L Jones on July 11, 2002
Format: Paperback
Owen Flanagan's statement of his approach to consciousness makes more sense than those of the Nagels, Jacksons, and Rosenthals of the world. While I tend to find materialist approaches most convincing, I'm often left wanting with respect to those materialists' understandings of real neuroscience.
What I liked about Flanagan's view is that he doesn't necessarily try to show off any sort of advanced knowledge of neuroscience because he doesn't have it, and realizes it. Instead, he emphasizes a multidisciplinary, practical approach to understanding consciousness.
However, I think he overestimates the importance of psychology -- this is, of course, probably based entirely on my bias as a student of neurobiology and reductionism, which purports someday to reduce psychology to neuroscience. But still, I give him credit for a solid theory that makes intuitive sense.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Steven H Propp TOP 100 REVIEWER on May 22, 2013
Format: Paperback
Owen Flanagan (born 1949) is Professor of Philosophy and Neurobiology at Duke University; he has also written other books such as The Problem Of The Soul: Two Visions Of Mind And How To Reconcile Them, The Really Hard Problem: Meaning in a Material World, etc.

He wrote in the Preface to this 1992 book, "Naturalism is the view that the mind-brain relation is a natural one. Mental processes just are brain processes... But there is a gnawing suspicion that the picture of persons as sophisticated information processors leaves something out. And indeed, it does. We are CONSCIOUS CREATURES... Our mental life has a phenomenal side, a subjective side, that the most sophisticated information processor might lack. Whereas the brain seems suited to processing information, it is harder to imagine the brain's giving rise to consciousness. The very idea of consciousness materializing... is puzzling. The rich phenomenology of the conscious stream and complex neural activity appear to belong to two entirely different orders: the subjective and the objective. This book is an attempt to make less puzzling the idea that consciousness is a natural phenomenon." (Pg. xi)

He says in the first chapter, "There are several main philosophical positions on the problem of consciousness... Finally, there is constructive naturalism. This is the position I aim to defend... I think that naturalism is true... I maintain that there is reason for optimism about our ability to understand the relation between consciousness and the brain.
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12 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Sandeep Mangla on April 14, 2000
Format: Paperback
After reading through various titles on Science, Consciousness and philosphy, I came across this title. I was initially apprehensive about one more title. Should I read or not! .
But well I am glad that I did. Never seen a better handling of topic in a simple narrative form.
I recommend this book but little caution that the person should have a little context on this subject.
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