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Consequences of Love Paperback – Bargain Price, February 1, 2009


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Vintage Books USA (February 1, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0099521148
  • ASIN: B008SMP3TU
  • Product Dimensions: 7.8 x 5.1 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.5 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,006,093 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Addonia's bold debut is more compelling as an indictment of the repressiveness of Saudi Arabia's Wahhabism than as a love story. In 1979, Naser's mother arranges for him and his brother, Ibrahim, to be smuggled from a Sudanese refugee camp into Jeddah and the care of a fundamentalist uncle. Naser learns to despise and fear the hate-mongering local imam, merciless religious police and powerful men who lust after boys with impunity. He never stops feeling homesick for his mother and her friends or frustrated by the Saudi's strict segregation of the sexes, and when a young woman drops a love letter at his feet, he's quickly smitten. The girl he calls Fiore (flower) is bold, passing him notes and wearing pink shoes to be recognizable in her abaya. Addonia's prose, unfortunately, loses credibility when he describes their passion. Both lovers risk public flogging or even execution, but neither doubts their relationship's correctness. The consequences they fear are of daring to love in a society dominated by hatred of foreigners, nonbelievers, women and often of love itself. Addonia's troubling revelations make for thought-provoking reading.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Review

"A gorgeous, slow-burning love story . . . touching, infinitely plausible, and infused with a brooding sensuality."
--Joanne Harris, author of "Chocolat"

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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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See all 6 customer reviews
I read this book in one sitting.
Jeannie Mancini
He decides to follow her on this journey of love in spite of the very clear and overwhelming risks.
F. Fabunmi
It was impossible to put down and so detailed and realistic, that I felt like I was there.
Katherine Waddelove

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By E. Smiley on October 28, 2012
Format: Hardcover
Browsing in the library, I was intrigued to find a book about an African immigrant in Saudi Arabia, written by an author who went through that experience himself. No doubt this is what caught the publishers' attention as well. It is at least minimally competent, with proper grammar and scene construction and so on, but otherwise isn't a novel I'd recommend.

The first-person narrator, Naser, came to Saudi Arabia as an Eritrean refugee at age 10. When the book starts, ten years later, he's alienated from his family, but has built a sort of life for himself--he has his own apartment, a job at a car wash, and friends with whom he sniffs glue and drinks perfume (um, okay) at night. But due to the strict separation between genders, he hasn't spoken to a woman in ten years, and falls head over heels the moment a veiled girl starts dropping love notes at his feet.

The relationship between Naser and the girl is at the heart of the book, and disappointed me. She's "in love" with him because of his looks; he's "in love" with her because she's available. Which could have been promising--not every fictional relationship need be a beautiful love story--except that it's never acknowledged that this relationship is founded on lust and loneliness and that the chances these two are actually compatible are slight. I'm willing to read a book about a pair of horny, repressed, desperate kids, but I want to see the actual consequences (pardon the pun) of that relationship, rather than just being told over and over that this is some earth-shaking romance.

And does this book ever tell, rather than show!
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By F. Fabunmi on April 1, 2012
Format: Hardcover
Who does not love a forbidden love story! This book is set in Saudi Arabia and has so many layers; culture, religion, freedom, love.....can't list it all. It is a must read about a love story between a refugee who is coming of age with all the attending loss of innocence and set in a country where he has limited rights as a foreigner. Nevertheless, his world comes alight when one of the beautiful but veiled women of Jeddah falls in love with him and takes the improbable step of dropping notes from under her abaya as she walks past him. He decides to follow her on this journey of love in spite of the very clear and overwhelming risks. Someone might even be setting him up.

I guarantee you, you will not be able to put this book down as you go through so many emotions from fear to excitement to sympathy for the oppressed and repressed. Even the religious police are battling their own demons and the reader actually begins to empathize with the pervasive lack of freedom that exists for both the enforcer and the two lovers who are living in fear but courageously and stubbornly press ahead.

Granted, there may be some exaggeration of the situation in Jeddah, however the author uses this to deliver the impact necessary to understand the hopelessness that comes from not having the freedoms we so take for granted. In the end, repression is really not about God but about the minority's power over others.

You have to read this!!
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Katherine Waddelove on June 6, 2011
Format: Paperback
This book, as past reviewers have said, was breathtaking and eye-opening. It was impossible to put down and so detailed and realistic, that I felt like I was there. It's definitely an amazing book and will have you ruminating over it for days after you have finished it.
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