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Consuming Russia: Popular Culture, Sex, and Society since Gorbachev Paperback – July 1, 1999

ISBN-13: 978-0822323136 ISBN-10: 0822323133

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 488 pages
  • Publisher: Duke University Press Books (July 1, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0822323133
  • ISBN-13: 978-0822323136
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.3 x 1.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,514,784 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“An invaluable key to reading the cultural salad of today’s Russia, useful to students as well as to their teachers. Barbie dolls, detective fiction, raves and the gay scene, tattoos and graffiti, even an Argentine soap opera that advertises a pyramid scheme: Consuming Russia is great as a classroom text and as a guidebook to the changing face of popular culture.”—James von Geldern, Macalester College


“This volume on post-Soviet Russian culture is noteworthy for its range and critical edge. The authors comment on the impact of Western productions and practices, as well as the reformulation of longstanding Russian traditions. Adele Barker is to be congratulated. From rock and sport to film and popular literature, here is a cook’s tour of the sad, curious, and sometimes marvelous carnival of post-Soviet public expression.”—Jeffrey Brooks, Johns Hopkins University

About the Author

Adele Marie Barker is Associate Professor of Russian and Comparative Cultural and Literary Studies at the University of Arizona. She is the author of The Mother Syndrome in the Russian Folk Imagination and coeditor of Dialogues/Dialogi: Literary and Cultural Exchanges between (Ex)Soviet and American Women, also published by Duke University Press.


More About the Author

Julia Friedman is a Russian-born art historian, writer and curator living in Tokyo. She received her Ph.D. in Art History from Brown University in 2005 specializing in 19th and 20th century art. At present, she is an Assistant Professor at Waseda University's School of International Liberal Studies where she teaches modern and contemporary art history. She is also a regular contributor to Artforum magazine.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 21 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 7, 1999
Format: Hardcover
This book has the rare quality of being a classroom text as well as a report. Today's Russia. Pyramid schemes, religion, rave parties,rock music, detective stories, cinema, pets, porn, graffiti, tattooing... the carnival of crazy New Russia to be read overnight. A shock.
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11 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Lindsey Roche on October 16, 2002
Format: Paperback
Going to Russia? Buy it. Interested in reading about contemporary Russia beyond what the newspapers tell you? Buy it. Taking a class on Russian culture? Buy it. I really can't recommend this book enough for specialists and novices alike. There's something to please everybody here.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By sof on March 16, 2009
Format: Paperback
This is requisite reading for anyone seeking meaning into the collapse of the Soviet Union and the cultural artifacts left in its wake. The Russian consumer, once a vessel of the state is now liberated and roaming freely across the nation's Savannah, so a group of Russian Area studies academics takes note and tracks its evolution. Their conclusions are stunning.

Discover how public and private domains are reinvented in the new Russia, how Soviet ideology and myth making compare favorably and unfavorably to Western marketing and how consumers fall into the perilous trap of being both its producers and end users.

Learn how artistic kitsch of Stalinist culture inspired a revolt by high art and culture in the 60's and '70s, only to succumb to the soap operas and pulp fiction of today.

How did yesterday's cultural elites become today's taxi cab drivers and yesterday's taxi cab drivers become today's elites? How did Soviet ideological symbols evolve from post-Communist kitsch to symbols of cool? Why is pornography more than just a means to sell products, but also a marker for a "private space" revolt against the public domain?

This is a remarkable collection of cultural essays, defiant to anybody who insists that understanding the Soviet collapse and post-Soviet milieu is possible only through political and economic narrative.
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