Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your email address or mobile phone number.

Buy Used
$3.35
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.
Used: Acceptable | Details
Sold by 2swellguys
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: Book is bent; still readable and enjoyable! Shows signs of wear. May show wear on spine and cover. 100% Satisfaction guaranteed! Eligible for Amazon Prime and Super Saver shipping programs!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Contagion Mass Market Paperback – December 1, 1996

3.8 out of 5 stars 116 customer reviews

See all 17 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Mass Market Paperback
"Please retry"
$2.37 $0.01

2016 Book Awards
Browse award-winning titles. See all 2016 winners
Available from these sellers.
click to open popover

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

When not one but three different extremely rare diseases kill several patients at a New York hospital, forensic pathologist Jack Stapleton suspects it's more than just coincidence. He thinks there's a connection between the appearance of the mysterious microbes responsible for the deaths and the HMO that owns the hospital--the same HMO that once destroyed his flourishing medical practice. Is Americare deliberately killing off its sickest patients--those who cost the most money to treat? Or is there an even more sinister motive behind the strange goings-on at Manhattan General, not to mention the attempts on Jack's life? And what is beautiful Terese Hagen, the hard-driving creative director of a Madison Avenue ad agency, doing in the middle of this slightly muddled, but still engrossing, tale of greed, medicine, and mayhem? Like Michael Crichton, whose Andromeda Strain remains the classic in the genre, Cook is sometimes heavy-handed when it comes to character development, and his fulminations about the dangers of managed care often get in the way of the plot. Still, Contagion will make you think twice about taking your next case of flu to the ER instead of your own bed. --Jane Adams --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

In Cook's numerous best-selling medical thrillers, the nasty microbes and lethal diseases are never as loathsome as the greedy villains who spread illness for profit. Here, a cynical forensics doctor suspects that a for-profit medical firm is murdering its more costly subscribers. A Literary GuildR main selection.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE


Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 496 pages
  • Publisher: G.P. Putnam's Sons; Reissue edition (December 1, 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0425155943
  • ISBN-13: 978-0425155943
  • Product Dimensions: 4.2 x 1.3 x 6.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (116 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #872,318 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
Manhatten General Hospital seems to be a dangerous place to be hospitalized in. During a ninety-six hour period nine people have succumbed to not one, not two but three extremely rare diseases, especially for New York City. Jack Stapleton is the New York city Medical Examiner who discovered these occurrences in the course of performing autopsies upon the victims and while no one has questioned the natural occurrence of these deadly, highly infectious diseases, Jack eventually comes to the conclusion that these events are too much of a coincidence to be accidental.

Contagion was written by a prolific writer named Robin Cook. If you are not familiar with Cook you should be. He is the unquestioned king of the medical mystery/suspense genre, having written well over twenty such books, dating back to the seventies. If you happen to remember the scary movie Coma, that was Robin Cook.

With not one but three different extremely rare pathogens killing patients at the New York hospital, Stapleton suspects it's more than just coincidence. But Jack can't seem to get anybody's attention, especially at the Hospital itself where the management even resents and has barred his presence. This leads Jack to suspect there may be a connection between the mysterious microbes responsible for the deaths and the HMO that owns the hospital, Americare, the same HMO that once destroyed his flourishing medical practice. However Jack is unable to convince his friends and co-workers Chet and Laurie or his bosses that these occurrences are being orchestrated, even after a deadly form of Influenza makes an appearance killing many more patients and hospital staff.

Could Americare deliberately killing off its sickest patients - those who cost the most money to treat?
Read more ›
Comment 25 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Contagion had been sitting in my bookcase unread since I obtained a proof of it in 1996. I decided to read it now because the movie reviews of Contagion were pretty good and I knew I'd never read the book if I had gone to see the movie first.

My decision was a huge mistake since the book was -- in a word -- awful.

It's not that the plot was so bad, which involves forensic pathologist Jack Stapleton suspecting that three different very rare diseases responsible for the deaths of several people at a New York hospital is more than just coincidence. While the plot is highly implausible and requires the reader to stretch their willingness-to-believe to the limit, the book does move along at a decent enough pace. What made this book so bad for me was that Cook's ability to create believable, richly developed characters and dialogue that real people would speak was virtually non-existent. The characters were so one-dimensional,cartoon-like and unrealistic, and the dialogue was so cliche-ridden and ridiculous, that I frequently found myself thinking that the influenza that killed several characters in the book couldn't be any more painful than the pain reading this book produced. What I am asking myself now is: Why did I finish this book if I thought it was so bad? Could I be a glutton for punishment?

I don't think so.

Despite my problems with the plot, character development and dialogue, I continued reading because I wanted to see what happened in the end. Reading the last 75 pages was the "straw that broke the camel's back" for me. While there was a bit of a surprising twist toward the end, the way Cook wrapped up this book was extremely poor and unrealistic. So poor, that the odds of any of the other unread books by Robin Cook in my bookcase ever being read are about the same as the cause for the influenza outbreak described in Contagion becoming reality.
21 Comments 14 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
"Contagion", by Robin Cook, is not yet another disease apocalypse novel. Instead, it is more of an extended essay on the evils of for-profit hospitals and corporations that spend on advertising and worry about the bottom line rather than spending money to improve care.

It's a flawed book. First and foremost is Cook's clumsy, wordy prose. The characters are two-dimensional, and the plot, despite being wildly improbable, somehow manages to be predictable. And the pacing is terrible! For example, the climax drags on and on long past when anyone smarter than a soybean would have figured out how the bad guys are going to get their just desserts. It's painful.

I managed to finish the novel; I recommend that you don't start.
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on February 24, 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback
It's obvious that the author is a doctor, not a writer. While the medical details are probably accurate (I wouldn't know), the prose is laughably bad. The plot drags (chapter after chapter setting up the medical situation), and then erupts into an unlikely series of narrow escapes. The mystery's solution comes out of left field. Not recommended.
Comment 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Mass Market Paperback
On one level, Robin Cook's "Contagion" covers familiar ground: a dedicated doctor, a health care system out of control, and a potential plague that could wipe out mankind. The hero in this case is Jack Stapleton, a medical examiner whose loss of family transforms him into an irreverent, anti-authority figure, a white man who lives in Harlem and rides a bicycle through the city. He also, of course, is the only one to see a pattern in several illnesses that appear at an HMO in New York City; illnesses that are rare and deadly, such as the hantavirus. Cook also delves into the advertising world with one character, Terese, who may not be all that she seems. Cook plays several plotlines concurrently, and for the most part successfully, although how they converge is a little predictable. The main illness, a strain of influenza that wiped out more people than World War I, is the most realistic part of the novel: Cook knows his viruses, and has done his historical research. At times predictable, but still gripping, "Contagion" is on the high end of medical thrillers.
Comment 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Pages with Related Products. See and discover other items: suspense thrillers