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Continuous Delivery: Reliable Software Releases through Build, Test, and Deployment Automation (Addison-Wesley Signature Series (Fowler)) [Kindle Edition]

Jez Humble , David Farley
4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (59 customer reviews)

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Book Description

Winner of the 2011 Jolt Excellence Award!

Getting software released to users is often a painful, risky, and time-consuming process.

This groundbreaking new book sets out the principles and technical practices that enable

rapid, incremental delivery of high quality, valuable new functionality to users. Through

automation of the build, deployment, and testing process, and improved collaboration between

developers, testers, and operations, delivery teams can get changes released in a matter of hours—

sometimes even minutes–no matter what the size of a project or the complexity of its code base.

 

Jez Humble and David Farley begin by presenting the foundations of a rapid, reliable, low-risk

delivery process. Next, they introduce the “deployment pipeline,” an automated process for

managing all changes, from check-in to release. Finally, they discuss the “ecosystem” needed to

support continuous delivery, from infrastructure, data and configuration management to governance.

 

The authors introduce state-of-the-art techniques, including automated infrastructure management

and data migration, and the use of virtualization. For each, they review key issues, identify best

practices, and demonstrate how to mitigate risks. Coverage includes

 

• Automating all facets of building, integrating, testing, and deploying software

• Implementing deployment pipelines at team and organizational levels

• Improving collaboration between developers, testers, and operations

• Developing features incrementally on large and distributed teams

• Implementing an effective configuration management strategy

• Automating acceptance testing, from analysis to implementation

• Testing capacity and other non-functional requirements

• Implementing continuous deployment and zero-downtime releases

• Managing infrastructure, data, components and dependencies

• Navigating risk management, compliance, and auditing

 

Whether you’re a developer, systems administrator, tester, or manager, this book will help your

organization move from idea to release faster than ever—so you can deliver value to your business

rapidly and reliably.

 



Editorial Reviews

Review

“If you need to deploy software more frequently, this book is for you. Applying it will help you reduce risk, eliminate tedious work, and increase confidence. I’ll be using the principles and practices here on all my current projects.”

Kent Beck, Three Rivers Institute

 

“Whether or not your software development team already understands that continuous integration is every bit as necessary as source code control, this is required reading. This book is unique in tying the whole development and delivery process together, providing a philosophy and principles, not just techniques and tools. The authors make topics from test automation to automated deployment accessible to a wide audience. Everyone on a development team, including programmers, testers,  system administrators, DBAs, and managers, needs to read this book.”

Lisa Crispin, co-author of Agile Testing

 

“For many organizations Continuous Delivery isn’t just a deployment methodology, it’s critical to doing business. This book shows you how to make Continuous Delivery an effective reality in your environment.”

James Turnbull, author of Pulling Strings with Puppet

 

“A clear, precise, well-written book that gives readers an idea of what to expect for the release process. The authors give a step-by-step account of expectations and hurdles for software deployment. This book is a necessity for any software engineer’s library.”

Leyna Cotran, Institute for Software Research, University of California, Irvine

 

“Humble and Farley illustrates what makes fast-growing web applications successful. Continuous deployment and delivery has gone from controversial to commonplace and this book covers it excellently. It’s truly the intersection of development and operations on many levels, and these guys nailed it.”

John Allspaw, VP Technical Operations, Etsy.com and author of

 

The Art of Capacity Planning and Web Operations

“If you are in the business of building and delivering a software-based service, you would be well served to internalize the concepts that are so clearly explained in Continuous Delivery. But going beyond just the concepts, Humble and Farley provide an excellent playbook for rapidly and reliably delivering change.”

Damon Edwards, President of DTO Solutions and co-editor of dev2ops.org

 

“I believe that anyone who deals with software releases would be able to pick up this book, go to any chapter and quickly get valuable information; or read the book from cover to cover and be able to streamline their build and deploy process in a way that makes sense for their organization. In my opinion, this is an essential handbook for building, deploying, testing, and releasing software.”

Sarah Edrie, Director of Quality Engineering, Harvard Business School

 

“Continuous Delivery is the logical next step after Continuous Integration for any modern software team. This book takes the admittedly ambitous goal of constantly delivering valuable software to customers, and makes it achievable through a set of clear, effective principles and practices.”

Rob Sanheim, Principal at Relevance, Inc.

From the Back Cover

Getting software released to users is often a painful, risky, and time-consuming process.

This groundbreaking new book sets out the principles and technical practices that enable

rapid, incremental delivery of high quality, valuable new functionality to users. Through

automation of the build, deployment, and testing process, and improved collaboration between

developers, testers, and operations, delivery teams can get changes released in a matter of hours—

sometimes even minutes-no matter what the size of a project or the complexity of its code base.

 

Jez Humble and David Farley begin by presenting the foundations of a rapid, reliable, low-risk

delivery process. Next, they introduce the “deployment pipeline,” an automated process for

managing all changes, from check-in to release. Finally, they discuss the “ecosystem” needed to

support continuous delivery, from infrastructure, data and configuration management to governance.

 

The authors introduce state-of-the-art techniques, including automated infrastructure management

and data migration, and the use of virtualization. For each, they review key issues, identify best

practices, and demonstrate how to mitigate risks. Coverage includes

 

• Automating all facets of building, integrating, testing, and deploying software

• Implementing deployment pipelines at team and organizational levels

• Improving collaboration between developers, testers, and operations

• Developing features incrementally on large and distributed teams

• Implementing an effective configuration management strategy

• Automating acceptance testing, from analysis to implementation

• Testing capacity and other non-functional requirements

• Implementing continuous deployment and zero-downtime releases

• Managing infrastructure, data, components and dependencies

• Navigating risk management, compliance, and auditing

 

Whether you're a developer, systems administrator, tester, or manager, this book will help your

organization move from idea to release faster than ever—so you can deliver value to your business

rapidly and reliably.

 


Product Details

  • File Size: 5253 KB
  • Print Length: 512 pages
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Up to 5 simultaneous devices, per publisher limits
  • Publisher: Addison-Wesley Professional; 1 edition (July 27, 2010)
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B003YMNVC0
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #74,795 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images?


Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
54 of 57 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Great nuggets lost in a repetitive bog October 4, 2011
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
This book is packed full of great ideas, but it suffers from painful redundancy. In response to another review, an author claims that it was intentional, so that one could skip around without reading from cover to cover. My response to that is that they should have had better editors. I have read many technical books designed for skipping around. None were as tediously repetitive as this one. Eventually, one has to expect that the reader is going to read more than one chapter and might even remember something from a previous chapter and do them the courtesy of not belaboring the main points each time. It's not even limited to once per chapter. The repetition frequently continues within each chapter, section by section.

That said, there are some good gems inside. My favorite parts might be the many real-world stories of how things can go wrong or how applying some of the principles smoothed things out. The detail, diversity and verisimilitude of those anecdotes sets the book apart from many books in the field.

I wish I could say this was a "must have" book, but it's really more of a "must skim" sort of book.
Was this review helpful to you?
38 of 46 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars How to deliver software to users at the click of a button September 12, 2010
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
This is one of the most important software books published in years. From the beginning and throughout the book, the authors emphasize the importance in establishing one delivery team consisting of various experts throughout the software lifecycle - developers, DBAs, Systems/Operations, network specialists, testers and so on. The overarching pattern the authors describe is the Deployment Pipeline, which is basically a staged process consisting of all of the steps to go from bare/virtual metal to a working system whenever there is a change to source files. Of course, the only way this can be done is through copious amounts of automation. The other key point the authors make is that this automated delivery system - itself - is versioned with every change. Not just the custom source code, but also the operating system(s), tools, configuration and everything necessary to create a working software system - a crucial aspect of the Deployment Pipeline.

To sum up key points from the book in a few bullets:

* The purpose of Continuous Delivery is to reduce the cycle time between an idea and usable software
* Automate (almost) everything necessary to create usable software
* Version complete software systems (not just source code) for every change committed to version control system
* Employ a Deployment Pipeline in which the entire system is recreated whenever a change is committed to the version-control system and provide continuous feedback
* Identify one delivery team consisting of various delivery experts - build, deploy, provisioning, database, testing, etc. - a concept emphasized in the DevOps movement

The authors go into great detail in describing each of these themes.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Delivering value continuously is an achievable reality October 18, 2013
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
Continuous Delivery from Jezz Humble and David Farley is an important contribution to the field of software development. It takes continuous integration to the logical conclusion and covers how to set up a continuous integration system which covers everything from check-in to delivery to production. It doesn't state you have to deliver directly in production, but it will explain how technically it is achievable to do that and what enormous benefits this brings to your organization.

Continuous delivery consists of three parts: 1) Foundation, 2) Deployment Pipeline, and 3) Delivery Ecosystem

The first four chapters cover the fundamentals the rest of the book is based on. The first chapter provides some problems with more traditional approaches and also introduces some principles extracted out of continuous delivery. The next three chapters cover topics that provide the basics of continuous delivery. Someone involved with agile development for a while is probably aware of most of this and it will be a quick read. For new people, these chapter provide a quick introduction to these topics so that you can understand the rest of the book. The chapters are: "configuration management," "continuous integration," and "implementing a testing strategy."

The second part is the core of the book. It explains the continuous delivery pipeline. This pipeline is a series of stages (a series of continuous integration systems) each stage covering higher-level wider-range of testing so that the confidence in the product increases the later the stage in the deployment pipeline passes. The stages the authors recommend in the deployment pipeline are: commit, acceptance, capacity, manual, production.
Read more ›
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83 of 108 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars barely ok and too repetitive January 25, 2011
By Augusto
Format:Hardcover
I found the book extremely repetitive, to the point that after the 4th chapter I started skimming through it, as there's no point in reading it all. I don't know if the idea is to repeat phrases until the reader buys into them, or what. I'm quite disappointed that Martin Fowler put his signature on this book. Maybe they're a big happy family at Thoughtworks ... and hey, they need to make money out of Go.

I don't rate this book as just 1 star, as it has some good ideas, but it could have been written in 150 pages (max) rather than 450. Some of the concepts that are repeated until boredom are:
- Don't build the binaries at each stage of the deployment pipeline, create them once an reuse them.
- The capacity testing environment should be as similar as possible to the production environment.
- Script everything!
- Don't let builds that fail unit or acceptance test into production
- Put all the configuration in version control (network, firewall, OS, etc)

I also found the book more directed to manager who don't really know or care about the technology, but want to talk "in techie" language to their engineers. There are too few examples of how to use technology to build a deployment pipeline and most of the talk stays at a very abstract level.

My bottom line, I strongly suggest to read some blog posts and watch some presentations (check infoq) about this subject, it takes less time and it's more enriching than reading this book.
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
A fantastic collection of good practices and hands-on implementation of solid development processes.
Published 17 hours ago by esset
4.0 out of 5 stars Still the bible for continuous delivery.
This is still the bible of Continuous Delivery. The only downside is that it is now a couple of years old and technologies have changed a bit. A new edition would be great.
Published 17 days ago by Kent T. Stuver
4.0 out of 5 stars Four Stars
Good book, i haven't finished jet but i'm enjoying it a lot, good recomendations!...
Published 2 months ago by afcano
5.0 out of 5 stars It is great stuff but get 'buy in' early
Trying to put this into practice requires overcoming many political hurdles. It seems much harder when dealing with a legacy product. It is great stuff but get 'buy in' early. Read more
Published 3 months ago by David H Stannard
4.0 out of 5 stars Good Job of Explaining Concepts
This book does a good job of explaining the concepts behind continuous delivery including why it is so important to software projects. Read more
Published 3 months ago by Oremo Ochillo
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
Fast ship. Brand new textbook. I would buy from this company again. Thanks!
Published 3 months ago by momOf4andDog
3.0 out of 5 stars Redundant but good
I agree with other reviewers, the author is very redundant. However, just reading up on the topic can open your eyes to new ideas. Read more
Published 3 months ago by A. E. Fenkner
5.0 out of 5 stars A great book!!
If you are enthusiastic with Technology, DevOps, Good Practices and the Great Software Beauty, you definitively should read this book.
Published 6 months ago by Junior
5.0 out of 5 stars Great book.
This book clearly and concisely explains the concepts of continuous delivery in an easy to read style that should be accessible for anyone. Read more
Published 6 months ago by T. Newsom
5.0 out of 5 stars EXCELLENT BOOK
I believe that if you are looking for a good guide to start your journey in this space, you can start with this book.
Published 7 months ago by Venerando Gacusan Tangco
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Aug 8, 2010 by Jez Humble |  See all 2 posts
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