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Continuous Delivery: Reliable Software Releases through Build, Test, and Deployment Automation (Addison-Wesley Signature Series (Fowler)) Hardcover – August 6, 2010

ISBN-13: 978-0321601919 ISBN-10: 0321601912 Edition: 1st

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Product Details

  • Series: Addison-Wesley Signature Series (Fowler)
  • Hardcover: 512 pages
  • Publisher: Addison-Wesley Professional; 1 edition (August 6, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0321601912
  • ISBN-13: 978-0321601919
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 7.2 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (52 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #26,639 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“If you need to deploy software more frequently, this book is for you. Applying it will help you reduce risk, eliminate tedious work, and increase confidence. I’ll be using the principles and practices here on all my current projects.”

Kent Beck, Three Rivers Institute

 

“Whether or not your software development team already understands that continuous integration is every bit as necessary as source code control, this is required reading. This book is unique in tying the whole development and delivery process together, providing a philosophy and principles, not just techniques and tools. The authors make topics from test automation to automated deployment accessible to a wide audience. Everyone on a development team, including programmers, testers,  system administrators, DBAs, and managers, needs to read this book.”

Lisa Crispin, co-author of Agile Testing

 

“For many organizations Continuous Delivery isn’t just a deployment methodology, it’s critical to doing business. This book shows you how to make Continuous Delivery an effective reality in your environment.”

James Turnbull, author of Pulling Strings with Puppet

 

“A clear, precise, well-written book that gives readers an idea of what to expect for the release process. The authors give a step-by-step account of expectations and hurdles for software deployment. This book is a necessity for any software engineer’s library.”

Leyna Cotran, Institute for Software Research, University of California, Irvine

 

“Humble and Farley illustrates what makes fast-growing web applications successful. Continuous deployment and delivery has gone from controversial to commonplace and this book covers it excellently. It’s truly the intersection of development and operations on many levels, and these guys nailed it.”

John Allspaw, VP Technical Operations, Etsy.com and author of

 

The Art of Capacity Planning and Web Operations

“If you are in the business of building and delivering a software-based service, you would be well served to internalize the concepts that are so clearly explained in Continuous Delivery. But going beyond just the concepts, Humble and Farley provide an excellent playbook for rapidly and reliably delivering change.”

Damon Edwards, President of DTO Solutions and co-editor of dev2ops.org

 

“I believe that anyone who deals with software releases would be able to pick up this book, go to any chapter and quickly get valuable information; or read the book from cover to cover and be able to streamline their build and deploy process in a way that makes sense for their organization. In my opinion, this is an essential handbook for building, deploying, testing, and releasing software.”

Sarah Edrie, Director of Quality Engineering, Harvard Business School

 

“Continuous Delivery is the logical next step after Continuous Integration for any modern software team. This book takes the admittedly ambitous goal of constantly delivering valuable software to customers, and makes it achievable through a set of clear, effective principles and practices.”

Rob Sanheim, Principal at Relevance, Inc.

About the Author

Dave Farley has been having fun with computers for nearly 30 years. Over that period he has worked on most types of software, from firmware, through tinkering with operating systems and device drivers, to writing games, and commercial applications of all shapes and sizes. He started working in large scale distributed systems about 20 years ago, doing research into the development of loose-coupled, message-based systems - a forerunner of SOA. He has a wide range of experience leading the development of complex software in teams, both large and small, in the UK and USA. Dave was an early adopter of agile development techniques, employing iterative development, continuous integration and significant levels of automated testing on commercial projects from the early 1990s. He honed his approach to agile development in his four and a half year stint at ThoughtWorks where he was a technical principal working on some of their biggest and most challenging projects. Dave is currently working for the London Multi-Asset Exchange (LMAX), an organization that is building one of the highest performance financial exchanges in the world, where they rely upon all of the major techniques described in this book.

 

Jez Humble has been fascinated by computers and electronics since getting his first ZX Spectrum aged 11, and spent several years hacking on Acorn machines in 6502 and ARM assembler and BASIC until he was old enough to get a proper job. He got into IT in 2000, just in time for the dot com bust. Since then he has worked as a developer, system administrator, trainer, consultant, manager, and speaker. He has worked with a variety of platforms and technologies, consulting for non-profits, telecoms, financial services and on-line retail companies. Since 2004 he has worked for ThoughtWorks and ThoughtWorks Studios in Beijing, Bangalore, London and San Francisco. He holds a BA in Physics and Philosophy from Oxford University and an MMus in Ethnomusicology from the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London. He is presently living in San Francisco with his wife and daughter.


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Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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I recommend the book to everyone involved in software engineering.
Michael Huettermann
The value is in the way to make this happen successfully and with minimal effort.
Masa K. Maeda
I found this book well written and all the advice offered easy to follow.
Dushan Hanuska

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

49 of 52 people found the following review helpful By D. Golden on October 4, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This book is packed full of great ideas, but it suffers from painful redundancy. In response to another review, an author claims that it was intentional, so that one could skip around without reading from cover to cover. My response to that is that they should have had better editors. I have read many technical books designed for skipping around. None were as tediously repetitive as this one. Eventually, one has to expect that the reader is going to read more than one chapter and might even remember something from a previous chapter and do them the courtesy of not belaboring the main points each time. It's not even limited to once per chapter. The repetition frequently continues within each chapter, section by section.

That said, there are some good gems inside. My favorite parts might be the many real-world stories of how things can go wrong or how applying some of the principles smoothed things out. The detail, diversity and verisimilitude of those anecdotes sets the book apart from many books in the field.

I wish I could say this was a "must have" book, but it's really more of a "must skim" sort of book.
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35 of 43 people found the following review helpful By Paul M. Duvall on September 12, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is one of the most important software books published in years. From the beginning and throughout the book, the authors emphasize the importance in establishing one delivery team consisting of various experts throughout the software lifecycle - developers, DBAs, Systems/Operations, network specialists, testers and so on. The overarching pattern the authors describe is the Deployment Pipeline, which is basically a staged process consisting of all of the steps to go from bare/virtual metal to a working system whenever there is a change to source files. Of course, the only way this can be done is through copious amounts of automation. The other key point the authors make is that this automated delivery system - itself - is versioned with every change. Not just the custom source code, but also the operating system(s), tools, configuration and everything necessary to create a working software system - a crucial aspect of the Deployment Pipeline.

To sum up key points from the book in a few bullets:

* The purpose of Continuous Delivery is to reduce the cycle time between an idea and usable software
* Automate (almost) everything necessary to create usable software
* Version complete software systems (not just source code) for every change committed to version control system
* Employ a Deployment Pipeline in which the entire system is recreated whenever a change is committed to the version-control system and provide continuous feedback
* Identify one delivery team consisting of various delivery experts - build, deploy, provisioning, database, testing, etc. - a concept emphasized in the DevOps movement

The authors go into great detail in describing each of these themes.
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81 of 105 people found the following review helpful By Augusto on January 25, 2011
Format: Hardcover
I found the book extremely repetitive, to the point that after the 4th chapter I started skimming through it, as there's no point in reading it all. I don't know if the idea is to repeat phrases until the reader buys into them, or what. I'm quite disappointed that Martin Fowler put his signature on this book. Maybe they're a big happy family at Thoughtworks ... and hey, they need to make money out of Go.

I don't rate this book as just 1 star, as it has some good ideas, but it could have been written in 150 pages (max) rather than 450. Some of the concepts that are repeated until boredom are:
- Don't build the binaries at each stage of the deployment pipeline, create them once an reuse them.
- The capacity testing environment should be as similar as possible to the production environment.
- Script everything!
- Don't let builds that fail unit or acceptance test into production
- Put all the configuration in version control (network, firewall, OS, etc)

I also found the book more directed to manager who don't really know or care about the technology, but want to talk "in techie" language to their engineers. There are too few examples of how to use technology to build a deployment pipeline and most of the talk stays at a very abstract level.

My bottom line, I strongly suggest to read some blog posts and watch some presentations (check infoq) about this subject, it takes less time and it's more enriching than reading this book.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Michael Huettermann on September 12, 2010
Format: Hardcover
My first impression was, as the book title suggests, that the book is strictly focused on delivery of software, delivering continuously, to add value to the system and to satisfy the customer (all changes should satisfy the customer and should add value!). That is one crucial aspect for sure. But it is also possible to "deliver continuously" by just throwing changes to production randomly, in bad quality. Thus a systematic process of staging of software is crucial, and introducing (how I call it) "Quality Gates" is essential for releasing software quickly and in best quality.

Continuous Delivery advocates a closer collaboration between all stakeholders that are involved in the software development process. It delivers a holistic approach to software engineering. The book underlines the importance of aspects like Continuous Integration, acceptance testing and component repositories, and discusses many common and valuable best practices. It discusses questions that are relevant for different project phases and stakeholders. The book delivers the authors' views and opinions in a very informative way.

The book does not discuss all possible questions along all development phases (just not possible). It assigns priorities where, in some cases, you may miss another controversal aspect of the discussion (e.g. in the context of "keep absolutely everything in version control"). The pragmatic discussion of "configuration management" will be helpful for many teams, though. In other cases, you may miss another hint or little step. One example for that is in the context of "meaningful commit messages". Here, the potential of task-based development is not really illustrated, maybe because due to the next fact: The book does not (or rarely) show how to implement the strategies with tools.
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