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Convergence: Book One of The Blending Mass Market Paperback – November 1, 1996


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Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Every 25 years, the law calls for a new Blending to rule the land. The Blending consists of five high practitioners of the magic of Fire, Earth, Air, Water and Spirit. But now is also the time foretold by the Prophecies?when the tyrannical Four would return to bring destruction to the land. Which means that this new Blending must be an extraordinary one. Convergence is an engaging, imaginative and often humorous story narrated by Tamrissa (Fire), that documents the journey, background and trials of Lorand (Earth), Clarion (Air), Vallant (Water) and Jovvi (Spirit) as they each compete for the new Blending. Although all very different, the five become close allies, overcoming their many fears and vulnerabilities to qualify for the competition that will determine the new Blending. Green (Dark Mirrors, Dark Dreams) has written a fine first installment to what promises to be a wonderful new fantasy series.
Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Review

"An acknowledged master of fantasy adventure." -- --Rave Reviews
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Product Details

  • Series: Blending (Book 1)
  • Mass Market Paperback: 448 pages
  • Publisher: Eos; Reprint edition (November 1, 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0380784149
  • ISBN-13: 978-0380784141
  • Product Dimensions: 4.2 x 1.1 x 6.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.7 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (67 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #970,113 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

18 of 20 people found the following review helpful By wysewomon on September 30, 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I bought this book last spring because I wanted to read something by someone I had never heard of and because Tom Canty is one of my favourite cover artists. I ended up getting the remaining four books in the series from the library because I wanted to know what happened, but I personally wouldn't recommend buying them.
This book, and the series, seems to have been designed around its structure. In the world in question, there are five major magical talents -- thus there are five main characters, five books in the series and so forth. While Green does a good job delineating the characters, she is less successful varying their experiences. Throughout the series it seems that she has applied one experiential template to every character; the tests and challenges they face are so infuriatingly similar that you could get a pretty good idea of the entire books by reading a fifth of it. Likewise, while they all have fears and flaws that are sensitively described, there is something very much the same about all of them and the characters' reactions to them. By the end it doesn't really matter whether the difficulty comes from family or from business associates or what.
A great deal of the plot seems to rely on miscommunication between the characters. While this is believable at the onset, it becomes less so as the story progresses until I, at least, just wanted to hurt someone. To me it seemed like Green went out of her way to make people stupider than any adult has a right to be.
The first book starts with a cutesy narration that continues between every chapter. It appears less and less often as the book and the series progress, but I could have done without it entirely.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Michael L. Dennis on April 29, 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I will never read a Harlequin romance novel and yet, somehow I got hooked on this novel which in many respects fits the romance category almost as strongly as the fantasy genre.
In a nutshell, five talented individuals are brought together as applicants for high practitioner of their "aspect". An "aspect" is the area that an individual can influence through mental concentration. Convergeance introduces the 5 aspects of Earth, Air, Water, Fire, and Spirit.
Each year, those individuals with strong affinities for an aspect are required to go to the capital to test their strength. Every 25 years, "blendings" of 5 talents can compete to become the rulers of the nation. No one really knows what happens to those who fail.
Green introduces each character, brings them together for a chapter or two, and then describes their struggles and testing. While sometimes repetitive, I found Green's technique rather comfortable and enjoyable as I watched each character deal with the same types of problems in subtly different ways. Then she brings the characters back in touch with each other again so that they can compare notes and interact in friendship and intimacy.
Quite an endearing book. You may want to make sure that you have the second novel handy as you near the end of Convergeance (Book 2 is called Competitions), because Green leaves you hanging.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Kylie Seymour on April 26, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
And of course therein lies the problem. This book is a very compelling read, as is the second, even though the idea is a little cliched. The story of 5 talents meeting and being drawn into a group is interesting, and I managed to ignore most of the writing problems in this first book(the sex scenes were pretty bad though)I even dashed off to the bookstore after reading the first 2(from the library) in order to get the next 3. The author's habit of telling the variations of each character's tests is interesting at first, but will become repetitive by the end of the series. And you can't just read one of these books, they each have an interesting cliffhanger that almost compells you to get to the next one. I really did enjoy the story, and there are some unexpected twists, i just think it could have been told in 3 books , not 5. In the end it is rather like eating 6 bowls of ice cream at one sitting- the first ones taste pretty good, by the last one you feel unwell.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Ryan Mills on November 12, 2009
Format: Mass Market Paperback
First of all, these books are not for everyone. As some reviewers have said, they fit almost as much into the Harlequin Romance genre as they do Fantasy. But more specifically dangerous: this series features a form of polyamory called polyfidelity, wherein a group of three or more are all simultaneously romantically interconnected, and everyone is cool with that, as long as no one strays outside of the group (that would be cheating). The morality of their arrangement is rather heavily exposited. Consequently, anyone with sturdy traditionalist views on romance should stay away, right there. These books were one of my first exposures to the idea of polyamory (along with Heinlein) and I have to admit the sentimentality of that is a large part of why I adore the books so very much. Interestingly, another group that might dislike the books is the gay/lesbian community, because despite the liberal outlook suggested by the protagonists' exploration of ethical non-monogamy, of all the dozens of characters presented throughout the series, only one or two minor characters are described as having any leanings away from heterosexuality and they are considered mentally unbalanced and freakish. I always had the impression that Sharon Green's philosophy was strange mix of feminism and Mormonism, but it doesn't mention anything about her religion on her webpage.

But on to the good! If you have an open mind and a mushy heart, these books can captivate you like that have me, like no others have. Green's ability to characterize is unique in my reading experience and often overwhelmingly emotional. She sets each character out as the product of a complex alchemy of their childhood, often rife with trauma, that gradually or suddenly sheds at least some light on every thing they do and think.
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