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Convict Conditioning: How to Bust Free of All Weakness-Using the Lost Secrets of Supreme Survival Strength [Kindle Edition]

Paul Wade
4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (286 customer reviews)

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Book Description

How to Train As If Your VERY LIFE Depended on Your Degree of REAL Strength, Power and ToughnessMost physical training systems are designed for the "domesticated" human animal. That is to say, for us humans who live lives of such relative security that we cultivate our strength and power more out of pride and for a sense of accomplishment than out of an absolute need to survive in the wild. The professional athlete hones his body to function well in a sports event-rather than to emerge safe from a life-or-death struggle. And even those in our military and LEO rely more on the security of their weapons and armor than on their own personal, raw power and brute strength to carry the day. There remains one environment where exuding the necessary degree of authoritative strength and power can mean the difference between life or death: the maximum security prison. In maximum security, the predator preys on the weak like we breathe air. Intimidation is the daily currency. You either become a professional victim or you develop that supreme survival strength that signals the predator to stay at bay.Paul Wade spent 19 years in hell holes like San Quentin, Angola and Marion. He entered this world a gangly, terrorized weakling and he graduated to final freedom, pound-for-pound one of the strongest humans on the planet. Paul Wade dedicated his prison life to the cultivation of that supreme survival strength. And ironically, it is in America's prisons that we can find some of the great, lost secrets of how to get immensely powerful and strong. Paul Wade mined these secrets as if his life depended on it-and of course in many ways it did.Finally free, Paul Wade pays his "debt to society"-not just with the horrors of his years in the hole-but with the greatest gift he could possibly give us: a priceless set of progressions that can take ANYONE who has the will from abject weakling to strength specimen extraordinaire.

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Product Details

  • File Size: 8680 KB
  • Print Length: 294 pages
  • Publisher: Dragon Door Publications; 1 edition (March 2, 2011)
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B004XIZN5M
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #6,339 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
270 of 276 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Bodyweight only training August 2, 2010
Format:Paperback
Convict Conditioning is a book of bodyweight only training. It utilizes six training exercises, each having ten different variations. The six exercises are called "the Big Six", and they are one-arm pushup, one legged squat (pistol squat), one-arm pullup, hanging straight leg raise, stand-to-stand bridge, and one-arm handstand pushup. You don't start with these exercises, but rather easier versions, and they represent the ultimate goal of the workout.

The workout is structured so that each exercise of the Big Six is divided into ten steps, the final step being the exercises listed earlier. As a general rule, the first steps are the easiest and you move gradually to more challenging variations. For example, you start the pushups series with standing pushups against the wall, and progress from there into incline pushups against a table, then kneeling pushpus, and so on until you reach the one-arm pushup.

Each of the steps are further divided into three stages: Beginner standard, Intermediate standard, and Progression standard. The standards differ from each other by the number of repetitions and sets you are supposed to perform each exercise. When you reach the Progression standard of an exercise, you can move on to the next step, where you'll start from the Beginner standard.

The author emphasizes clean performance of exercises, and slow progression through the steps. You are supposed to start from step one with each exercise even if you could jump directly to step six, for example. And you are supposed to progess slowly through each step, taking a minimum of one month on each step no matter how easy the exercise is for you.

The name of the book is derived from the inception of the training system - or so the story goes.
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145 of 149 people found the following review helpful
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
This is a classic bodyweight training manual. Moreover, it's different than any other you'll likely read. It's written in a colorful, easy reading style with no pretense.

According to the author, an ex-convict, "The average gym junkie today is all about appearance, not ability. Flash, not function. These men may have big, artificially pumped up limbs, but all that the size is in the muscle tissue; their tendons and joints are weak. Ask the average muscleman to do a deep one-leg squat-ass-to-floorstyle-and his knee ligaments would probably snap in two. What strength most bodybuilders do have, they cannot use in a coordinated way; if you asked them to walk on their hands they'd fall flat on their faces."

This is an extraordinary book about functional bodyweight training. By functional I mean you are taught to be strong for everyday life -- not muscular for the sake of appearance.

Like the author, I've seen beefy guys and gals at the gym walking ahead of me looking like they could hardly move because they had so much muscles on their legs. They walked like a fat person whose thighs rub against each other. Not a pretty sight.

The author continues, "To become hugely powerful, you don't need weights, cables, fancy machines, or any other crap that the industry or the infomercials are brainwashing you into thinking you can't do without. You can gain Herculean strength-genuine brawn and vitality-with no special equipment at all. But to unlock this power-the power of your own body-you need to know how. You need the right method, the art.

Such a method does in fact exist. It's based on traditional, ancient forms of training, techniques which are as old as training itself.
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116 of 130 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Solid material encased in hype October 11, 2011
Format:Paperback
Rumor has it that John DuCane, the founder of Dragon Door, wrote this, with some help from Pavel, and that makes sense. For a marketing gimmick DuCane created a pen name and positioned the book as the work of an ex-con publishing training secrets of hard cases who've developed the physiques needed to withstand a long stretch behind bars. The tone of the book is geared toward a boy of about fourteen, which is okay, it means it's certainly an easy read though you might feel a little debased. Once you get to the exercises things improve. As other reviewers have explained, the book emphasizes a series of bodyweight exercises, none of which are new. What's valuable here is the progression. I haven't seen a progression this well-planned before. For example, push ups are taught by starting with standing push ups against a wall, which almost anyone can do, then incline push ups, then push ups from your knees, then half-way push ups, then full push ups, then one-arm push ups. This is the value of the book. There are also some good tips offered, like pausing at the bottom rather than slamming into the floor. If you want a surprisingly gentle regimen that will help you progress to increasingly harder versions of classic bodyweight exercises, this is a useful book. The best books on bodyweight exercises, in my view, are Ross Enamait's books--I wish he sold them on Amazon--and they don't have the hypertrophied prose that makes me feel like I'm in sixth grade. They're also less expensive, and they read like they were written by an adult for adults. They don't, however, have the unique zero to hero progression Convict has. Read more ›
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Great book! It explains the purpose and power of ...
Great book! It explains the purpose and power of calisthenics movements. This book contains knowledge that has been lost to the modern fitness community. Read more
Published 4 hours ago by Matthew Morscher
5.0 out of 5 stars best book on bodyweight training I have found
Very detailed and specific, not just a bunch of descriptions of various exercises but a comprehensive progressive training program. Read more
Published 1 day ago by Dmitry Buterin
5.0 out of 5 stars Enough to work on for years
At the time of my review I have been performing these exercises for about 3 weeks. I am doing my best to follow the protocol found inside to slowly build up to the more advanced... Read more
Published 3 days ago by Msbttrfly
5.0 out of 5 stars Great stuff
This book exceeded my expectations. This is a must have for anyone serious about building strength and mass. Read more
Published 5 days ago by Ira Lynch
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
Good book for anyone getting away from metal weights. Lots of info on bodyweight training..
Published 7 days ago by danny
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Book!
Excellent Book!!! I have read several exercise books in the past and this is by far the best. Instructions and exact exercise techniques are very helpful.
Published 9 days ago by CT
5.0 out of 5 stars usually there are only a few pages of useful applicable information
Its not common for a whole book to have information your seeking, usually there are only a few pages of useful applicable information. Read more
Published 11 days ago by malcolm cuthbert
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
Excellent training book.
Published 14 days ago by john porter
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
Love it!
Published 16 days ago by Daryl Begin
5.0 out of 5 stars great
Really breaks down each step to make it doable, he doesn't just throw you in the deep end. Can't wait to get started
Published 18 days ago by peco
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