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Cooking in Europe, 1250-1650 (The Greenwood Press Daily Life Through History Series) (The Greenwood Press Daily Life Through History Series: Cooking Up History) Hardcover – June 30, 2006


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Product Details

  • Series: The Greenwood Press Daily Life Through History Series: Cooking Up History
  • Hardcover: 200 pages
  • Publisher: Greenwood (June 30, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0313330964
  • ISBN-13: 978-0313330964
  • Product Dimensions: 7 x 0.5 x 10 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #784,440 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 9 Up—These well-organized titles provide historical overviews, discussing changes in recipes brought about by changes in ways of life, e.g., agrarian to industrialized economy, the Depression, and limitation of ingredients due to wars. Both books include commentary and recipes. However, neither book states amounts of ingredients, the exception being the third chapter in America, but, even then, not all of the recipes include measurements. Many of the recipes make large batches of a particular dish without stating the number of servings. Text boxes range from "14th-Century Advice to a Young Bride" (Europe) to "To Dress a Chicken" (America), and glossaries explain terms not commonly in use today. The black-and-white illustrations of equipment and foods are excellent. Back matter includes extensive bibliographies of cookbooks and good indexes. The series foreword states that the recipes are meant to appeal to "novice" cooks. However, only very experienced or adventurous cooks would try to re-create these dishes.—Marilyn Fairbanks, Azure IRC, Brockton High School, MA
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

"For cooks with a curiousity about history and for student historians with an interest in cooking, this volume offers a broad sampling of authentic recipes that were used in Europe during the period 1250-1650. Presented in the same form in which they first appeared, the recipes are accompanied by explanations of unfamiliar terms and basic guidelines for preparation."

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Reference & Research Book News



"There is a 28 page introduction for students, but the collection of recipes is superlative. From 'roasted cat in the Middle Ages' (though Albala suggests, not a favourite dish) to red carrot sauce in the Late Renaissance (he says it was perhaps the word 'orange' that was not yet invented, not that carrots were really red), this is a book of wonderful detail."

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Petits Propos Cullinaires


More About the Author

Ken Albala is Professor of History at the University of the Pacific. He is the author or editor of 21 books on food including Eating Right in the Renaissance, Food in Early Modern Europe, Cooking in Europe 1250-1650, The Banquet: Dining in the Great Courts of Late Renaissance Europe, Beans: A History (winner of the 2008 IACP Jane Grigson Award), and Pancake. He has also co-edited The Business of Food, Human Cuisine, Food and Faith and edited A Cultural History of Food: The Renaissance and The Routledge International Handbook to Food Studies. Albala was also editor of the Food Cultures Around the World series with 30 volumes in print, the 4-volume Food Cultures of the World Encyclopedia and is now series editor of Rowman Littlefield Studies in Food and Gastronomy for which he has written a textbook entitled Three World Cuisines: Italian, Chinese, Mexican (Winner of the Gourmand Best Foreign Food Book in the World 2012). Albala was also co-editor of the journal Food Culture and Society and is editing a 3 volume encyclopedia on Food Issues for Sage. He has also co-authored two cookbooks: The Lost Art of Real Cooking and The Lost Arts of Hearth and Home. His most recent works are a translation of the 16th century Livre fort excellent de cuysine, A Food History Reader and Nuts: A Global History.

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Chris on January 10, 2011
Format: Hardcover
I just used this book to prepare a "pilgrimage" feast for our local SCA group. We went to Italy, Spain and England. Great book for those who have some experience in redacting medieval and renaissance receipts!
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