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Cooking Fresh from the Mid-Atlantic: Tantalizing Recipes, Famous Chefs, and Conversations Paperback – July 1, 2002


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 250 pages
  • Publisher: Eating Fresh Publications (July 1, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0967367018
  • ISBN-13: 978-0967367019
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 7.4 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,854,885 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

As partner and cofounder of Eating Fresh Publications, Fran McManus brings 20 years' experience in graphic design and marketing for natural- and organic-food enterprises. She served as marketing representative for a Princeton-based nonprofit natural foods store, where she spearheaded a number of consumer-education and outreach programs on subjects ranging from organic agriculture to bovine growth hormone to genetic diversity in food crops to organic gardening. She is also editor of "Eating Fresh from the Organic Garden State" (NOFA-NJ, 1998).

Wendy Rickard, Eating Fresh Publications partner and cofounder, brings more than 20 years' experience in marketing, publishing, and communications. She is president of The Rickard Group, Inc., a marketing and communications firm with national accounts in the areas of technology, higher education, and holistic health. In 1994, Wendy was recognized by BusinessWeek magazine as "a pioneer on the digital frontier" for her work in electronic media. She is editor of the award-winning OntheInternet magazine for the Internet Society and its electronic counterpart, e-OTI.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 6, 2003
This is just one of the many "out of this world" recipes in this cook book. The fresh ingredients are key, which is why is certainly helps to follow the seasonal recommendations, but for food lovers, and those interested in where our food comes from, this book is magic!
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5 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 14, 2003
I was excited when I saw this book in the Washington Post's Food Section and ordered it immediately but its not very good. Spend your money elsewhere.
Problems include:
1) It's way too preachy. There are many, many, essays that basically have the same themes: eat local produce and meats; small farms are good--large farms are evil; eat organic. Great, BUT if I bought a book about using local products then I probably buy into that already. I need more information less preaching.
2) The real information provided is too little and too disorganized. There are basically 6 pages with what's in season. One page each for Spring,Summer,Fall, and Winter, plus two pages in the back with the seasonal availability of some produce and meats. Very little information on how to get the most out of each season or what to look for when shopping for the best produce or meats.
3) The recipes. Mangos, Coconuts, and Vidalia Onions are not from the mid-atlantic but you'll find recipes in this book that feature these ingredients. Likewise, there may be a regional source for local prosciutto and Gorgonzola, but I think I'll keep buying mine from Italy.
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Rachel Schulken on August 20, 2003
What a treasure I have found! This book causes me to recall the days when I took my two small children to visit a nearby farm. I had lost that spirit of adventure and had forgotten the fun it is to leave the city and go to the farm for a morning in the open air next to the soil - where farmers are everyday. So it has rekindled my spirit and made me understand why local farmers remain true to the soil and their way of life. It is a great service to the community which the local farmers render - to avoid chemical fertilizers and pesticides - to plant and
cultivate organically - to raise free-roaming livestock and poultry. Why did people in early Biblical times live so long? Well, pure air, water and soil must have been part of the answer.
Misses McManus and Rickard have done us a grand service to present a book that so beautifully and ably promotes eating for good health. At the same time we eat for good health we find superior flavor. They point out that we dine on foods with short supply lines and therefore those which can reach our tables only days and in some cases hours after being harvested; that is, when the produce is at its peak of flavor. We can savor it at the same time we are promoting health for our families and strengthening our local economy. Getting those lovely fruits and vegetables to the consumer is often done in farmer's markets where the selling is direct. The money stays with the local farmer and benefits the local economic community.
It is so nice not to have to subscribe to "Reminiscences" or to "The Good Old Days" to read about life on the farm. It still exists. You can go there, pick your own berries, gather your own tomatoes. Locally bought produce does not have to be gathered green and hard. It's supply line is short.
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 13, 2003
Cooking Fresh from the Mid-Atlantic continues the fine tradition
of Cooking Fresh from the Bay Area: fabulous recipes from fine restaurants and lots of info on where to find fresh ingredients.
Fresh food has become so rare, most of us have forgotten what it tastes like--until we are wowed by the genuine article.
I will use the Mid-Atlantic book to find restaurants on my upcoming trip to Washington, D.C.
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