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Cooking Up a Storm: Recipes Lost and Found from The Times-Picayune of New Orleans Paperback – October 29, 2008


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Cooking Up a Storm: Recipes Lost and Found from The Times-Picayune of New Orleans + Who's Your Mama, Are You Catholic, and Can You Make A Roux? (Book 1): A Cajun / Creole Family Album Cookbook
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 368 pages
  • Publisher: Chronicle Books; Original edition (October 29, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0811865770
  • ISBN-13: 978-0811865777
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 2 x 9.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (92 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #12,158 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Marcelle Bienvenu writes the popular "Cooking Creole" column for The Times-Picayune of New Orleans, and has collaborated with Chef Emeril Lagasse on several of his cookbooks. She lives in St. Martinville, Louisiana.

Judy Walker is the food editor of The Times-Picayune of New Orleans. She is the author or co-author of five cookbooks on the food of the Southwest.

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Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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See all 92 customer reviews
The recipes are great.
Tiphanie Clark
Ii am a lover of New Orleans cooking, so I have a lot of cookbooks about that style of cooking.
. Matthews
One of the best cookbooks I have ever read - and I wrote a review of it on my blog as well.
Sandra L. Smith

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

39 of 40 people found the following review helpful By S. Franke on January 21, 2009
Format: Paperback
This cookbook is not the most visually stimulating, with no pictures and no color. However, I quickly got over my disappointment with the overall look when I began thumbing through these fun dishes, full of Louisiana flavor and ingredients that are universally appealing. I began to realize that this cookbook was put together just as one would on their own: a collection of recipes that have been passed down through the years between family and friends. I immediately ordered 5 more as gifts.
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27 of 29 people found the following review helpful By NuJoi VINE VOICE on February 21, 2009
Format: Paperback
I absolutely love this cookbook! It is truly a collection of beloved favorites, even for a former transplant who claims New Orleans as an adopted home.

Where do I start? These are popular recipes, requested by those who lost their treasured Times-Pic and other recpes in Hurricane Katrina. (What a novel idea to combine them in a cookbook. This just shows you how important food is to the culture.)

I am really impressed by the extensive range of recipes. You will find a wide range of recipes here, from appetizers, to drinks, to Lenten dishes to desserts. These foods eaten as part of the everyday the Southeastern Louisiana lifestyle. The recipes are favorites from both home kitchens and restaurants. My only criticism is that there is no etouffee recipe.

I would not recommend this book as a souvenir cookbook or for the unintiated. This is for people who know the food of the region, love it and cook it regularly. The recipes aren't extremely difficult, but a properly made roux can be challenging if you've not done it before.

If you know anyone who misses NOLA and her foods, buy this book.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Super-picky Designer on January 4, 2013
Format: Paperback
If you're looking for trendy, chef-driven recipes, cutting-edge New Orleans cuisine, or a "bible" of creole cooking fundamentals and techniques, look elsewhere; there are many, many other fine books that cover these subjects very well. This book was never meant to be these things, and clearly states that these are the recipes that New Orleans families clipped out of the local newspaper and passed down through generations. This is a book about the real, everyday food made by the real, everyday people of New Orleans. In most other cities, that may not amount to anything terribly interesting, but, alas, New Orleans is no ordinary city.

During the four years I lived there, I thoroughly enjoyed learning and sampling the entire food culture here, different from anywhere else in the world. Sure, home cooks may not normally be making the kind of food that one would buy a cookbook for, but New Orleans home cooks are not your normal home cooks. These recipes reflect a whole New Orleans mentality that is just not the same as elsewhere, so even seemingly basic-sounding, "American" dishes are actually much more interesting than you would think. This is a book for people that enjoy old-fashioned home cooking, and this is the home cooking of a very distinct culture. This is comfort food, New Orleans style. It would not be inaccurate to say that ALL New Orleans food is comfort food.

The newspaper food section has more color and photography than this book. Don't expect to find any photos or any flourishes, just lots of very yummy, guilty-pleasure-kind of recipes that are generally simple and don't require hard-to-find ingredients. You'll feel like you've been invited to supper at a New Orleans' family's home, and you'll be hoping that you get invited back!
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Ann Carman on March 3, 2009
Format: Paperback
Everybody who loves Louisiana cooking should have this book! The recipes are old family ones, recovered after Katrina, and the accompanying stories are delightful.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Donald Smith on August 21, 2009
Format: Paperback
There are a lot of good home cooking recipes here as well as some resturant recipes. Ms. Bienvenu once again did not disappoint me.
As a displaced New Orleanean I was pleased to find recipes from my childhood as well as some new dishes to try.
The recipes are also a celebration of South Louisiana's cultural diversity, Cajun, French, Irish, Italian, ...and so on.
I recommend this book for your Louisiana cookbooks shelf, right next to The Picayune's Creole Cookbook, River Road Recipes I & II, and anything by Chefs John Folse or Paul Prudhomme.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By S. Pearon on March 11, 2009
Format: Paperback
Cooking Up a Storm has large variety of recipes from the South. Many are from establishements that are no longer in business. Several of the recipes have the story and history behind it. It's not only for cooks, but for people interseted in a little piece of New Orleans history! Don't miss out on this one!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By J. Goodman on March 15, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
If a cookbook can make you homesick this one did it for me. I grew up in New Orleans. I remember all the recipes in the Times Picayune. People saved these recipes for years but lost them in Hurricane Katrina. The Times-Picayune packaged them up and published the all time favorites in this cookbook. I loved it so much I bought several to give to family members for Christmas. These recipes are the real deal.....not some made up "Cajun" recipes. These are the things cooked at home by the people of New Orleans.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Toots on March 20, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Bought this cookbook for my husband for Christmas and my first adventure with the book was to try the biscuits. I've been looking for the perfect biscuit recipe for 25 years, and believe I've just found it. We have been cooking our way through the cookbook and I have found only one or two recipes that I might not try again. On a more serious note, the stories of the recipe requests from victims of katrina are sobering and gut wrenching. What a terrific idea for a cookbook and a way to keep New Orleans' cookin' alive through the stories of the survivors. Who dat!
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