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Cool Jazz Sound


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Product Details

  • Format: Color, Import, NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Region: All Regions
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: Stars of Jazz
  • DVD Release Date: June 7, 2005
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0002QXSQU
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #390,139 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Special Features

None.

Editorial Reviews

NTSC/Region 0. Exemplary television program from April, 1959, with the Miles Davis Quintet featuring John Coltrane, Wynton Kelly, Paul Chambers and Jimmy Cobb, and including the Gil Evans Orchestra. Singer/Actor Bobby Troup hosted this excellent television series that featured the best in contemporary jazz. This episode collects a stunning array of jazz heavyweights together on one stage. This performance was given around the same time that he released the seminal Kind Of Blue album. This is an important document of a musician who was responsible for changing the face of the American music scene many times over, and will be an appreciable addition to the collection of any jazz enthusiast. The song list includes 'So What', 'The Duke', 'Blues for Pablo' and 'New Rhumba'. Rhpasody.

Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

27 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Clare Quilty on February 19, 2005
Format: DVD
Great television performance from April, 1959, featuring Miles' legendary quintet (including Coltrane, Wynton Kelly, Paul Chambers and Jimmy Cobb) and the Gil Evans Orchestra.

They play:

"So What"

"The Duke"

"Blues for Pablo"

"New Rhumba"

In terms of picture quality, this was the first time I've seen the broadcast (barring the few, bracing moments of "New Rhumba" used in Ken Burns' Jazz) so I have nothing to compare it against but it looked fine to me, considering the source.

It's under 25 minutes and there's not an extra feature to be found, which is a shame, but this is both historic TV and incredible music. Maybe one day there'll be an expanded edition but until then, this is where it's at.
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29 of 31 people found the following review helpful By Philip A.Cohen VINE VOICE on January 21, 2005
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Having owned this film on 1980's Japanese Laserdisc,I was eager to see how it would fare on DVD.The program is a 1959 kinescope(video to film transfer,the typical way that T.V. programs were archived back then,since videotape had only been invented one year before,in 1958).The condition of the film print used here is generally freer from scratches than the one seen on the Japanese Laserdisc,though in some scenes,there is a very mild horizontal distortion;nothing objectionable.Despite the concern of another reviewer,Miles' performance is indeed presented in its' entirety here.However,for unknown reasons,host Robert Herridge's spoken introduction to the program's second half is edited out of this print.However,interestingly,there are occasional video drop-out streaks visible in all film prints of the program,indicating that this video to film transfer wasn't made during the live telecast,but rather from a videotape;that the program DID exist on the(then new) videotape format at one time.I wonder,if somewhere in CBS television archives,if that videotape still exists,and,if so,if it is still in playable condition.But CBS may not care to look,since they no longer own the program.The new DVD is licensed from a sub-licensee,but the Japanese Laserdisc stated that it was copyrighted by The Estate of(program host) Robert Herridge.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By The Delite Rancher VINE VOICE on June 8, 2005
Format: DVD
As seen in New York's Studio 61, "Cool Jazz Sound" features some beautiful music by Miles Davis. Recorded in 1959 with the great quintet and the Gil Evans Orchestra, the DVD is a snap shot of a golden time period. The music is moody, intellectual, hip and low-key. While it's painfully short, 'So What' makes it worth the price alone. The audio quality is excellent but the video quality is mediocre. Given today's inexpensive video technology, the picture quality is unexcusable. The viewer just needs to light a cigarette to feel like he is watching an art house film in some 1950's theater. While length and picture quality are drawbacks, Miles Davis enthusiasts will be grateful to lay their eyes on the great quintet interacting with the Gil Evans orchestra.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By R. Johnson on January 14, 2006
Format: DVD
For enthusiasts of the early quintet years, it is great to finally get a video like this released. I love to watch Miles and Coltrane (and the rest of the band) interact. The DVD is just under 25 minutes but, until something else comes along, I am grateful to at least have this. Though the video quality could be better, the performances are intense and well recorded.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Richard Hawkins on March 5, 2006
Format: DVD
Unfortunately, video had only just been invented; otherwise maybe we'd have a filmed record of this programme (film is completely superior to video in depth of field, richness of tones and details). It's fairly short too, less than the half hour that Robert Herridge claims at the end (apparently they cut his introduction to the second half and, of course, there would have been ads) and it's tragic that Bill Evans and Cannonball Adderley are missing, though it's wonderful to see and hear John Coltrane, Wynton Kelly, Paul Chambers and Jimmy Cobb, and Miles of course, who all played on "Kind of Blue", one of the greatest records of the 20th century. The only track where Coltrane gets to really blow is "So What". The other 3 tracks are from the "Miles Ahead" session and Gil Evans is in fine, animated form conducting the ensemble.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By DWAinLA on August 25, 2005
Format: DVD
Should be 5 stars for the music, and nice to have this classic available on DVD, but too bad the video and music are out of sync! Like watching Coltrane play in a badly dubbed kung fu flick!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Jon L. Hawkins on August 2, 2005
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This is almost the same group that performed on "Kind of Blue", arguably the finest jazz album ever made. Missing are Julian "Cannonball" Adderley and Bill Evans.But the performances

of the musicians , playing with an intensity rarely seen from musicians today, are outstanding.

The 1959 technology might be a bit disappointing for some.

Black and white monophonic tape can't compete with digital sound and images, but this is historic music, that is a must for the serious collector.

Jon L. Hawkins
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